Lighthouses of the Isle of Man

The Isle of Man (or Mann) is a large island in the Irish Sea very roughly equidistant from southwestern Scotland, northwestern England, and northeastern Ireland. The island is a self-governing territory recognizing the British monarch as Lord of Mann; it is not part of the United Kingdom and does not belong to the European Union. Man is accessible by air or by ferry from Heysham and Liverpool in England, Belfast in Northern Ireland, and Dublin in the Irish Republic.

In 1815 the Northern Lighthouse Board, the Scottish lighthouse agency, asked for and received permission from the British and Manx Parliaments to build lighthouses at Point of Ayre and Calf of Man to protect shipping to and from the Firth of Clyde in Scotland. The Board has continued to maintain the major lighthouses on the island ever since. Harbor lights, however, are maintained by Isle of Man Harbours.

Special thanks to Fred Fox, the Retained Lightkeeper responsible for all NLB Isle of Man lights except Chicken Rock, for supplying information on these lights not available from any other source.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from Volume A of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 114.

General Sources
Northern Lighthouse Board
The Board's web site includes information and photos for many of the lighthouses.
A Lightkeeper's Journey
An excellent site posted by NLB Retained Lightkeeper Fred Fox.
Lighthouses of the Isle of Man
This site by Frances Coakley covers the major towers with photos and historical notes.
Online List of Lights - Isle of Man
Outstanding photos by Fox, posted by Alexander Trabas.
Isle of Man
Photos by Anna Jenšíková.
Lighthouses of Scotland, United Kingdom
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com; the Scotland collection includes lighthouses of the Isle of Man.
Lighthouses in the Isle of Man
Photos available from Wikimedia; many of these photos were first posted on Geograph.org.uk.
Isle of Man Lighthouses
Historic postcard images posted by Michel Forand.
Britische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.

Langness Light
Langness Light, Derbyhaven, June 2007
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Phil Catterall

Point of Ayre (Ayre Sheading) Lighthouses
Point of Ayre (High)
1819 (Robert Stevenson). Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); four white flashes, separated by 2.3 s, every 20 s. 30 m (98 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery. 1st order Barbier & Bénard Fresnel lens (1890). Tower painted white with two broad red horizontal bands; gallery painted buff, lantern black. 2-story keeper's house and other buildings. Fog horn (3 blasts every 60 s). Unusual 10 m (33 ft) inverted-wedge-shaped fog signal tower with two large diaphone horns. Trabas has Fox's photo (also seen at right), John Quine has another good photo, NLB also has a page on this light station, Wikimedia has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a fine satellite view. Located near the northeastern point of the island, at the end of the A16 highway, about 15 km (9 mi) north of Ramsey. The surrounding area is privately owned and accessible only by permission of the owner. Site and tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. Site manager: private. ARLHS IOM-013; Admiralty A4720; NGA 4896.
Point of Ayre Low ("Winkie")
1890 (David A. Stevenson). Inactive since 2010. 10 m (33 ft) two-stage octagonal cylindrical tower with lantern and double gallery; the cast iron upper half of the tower has a smaller cross-section than the concrete lower half. Upper half of the tower painted red, lower half white; the lantern roof is black. 300 mm lens (1993). David Dixon has a closeup photo, Andy Stephenson has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The cast iron tower, prefabricated by James Dove and Co. of Edinburgh, was placed at the edge of the sea about 225 m (250 yd) from the main light. In 1950, since gravel buildup had extended the shore, the concrete tower was built another 230 m (250 yd) seaward, and the historic tower was relocated atop the new tower. The light was discontinued in April 2010. The lighthouse is probably endangered by rising sea levels. Located on the beach at the northeastern point of the island, beyond the end of the A16 highway. The surrounding area is privately owned and accessible only by permission of the owner. Site and tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. Site manager: private. ARLHS IOM-021; ex-Admiralty A4722; NGA 4900.

East Coast (Garff Sheading) Lighthouses
* Ramsey North Pier
1868. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); quick-flashing green light. 7 m (23 ft) hexagonal cast iron tower with lantern. Upper 2/3 of lighthouse painted white; lower 1/3 painted black. Trabas has Fox's photo, a photo of the two Ramsey lights is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. There are records of a light at the Ramsey Harbour entrance as early as 1766. Located at the end of the northern of two parallel piers at the entrance to Ramsey Harbour. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-024; Admiralty A4798; NGA 5044.
Point of Ayre High Light
Point of Ayre High Light, Ramsey
photo copyright Fred Fox; used by permission
* Ramsey South Pier (3)
1876 (station established 1844). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); quick-flashing red light. 7 m (23 ft) hexagonal cast iron tower with lantern. Upper 2/3 of lighthouse painted white with a single red horizontal band; lower 1/3 painted black. Trabas has Fox's photo, a photo of the two Ramsey lights is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The original wood tower was quickly replaced by a stone tower in 1845. Located at the end of the southern of two parallel piers at the entrance to Ramsey Harbour. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-015; Admiralty A4796; NGA 5040.
Maughold Head
1914 (David A. and Charles Stevenson). Active; focal plane 65 m (212 ft); three white flashes every 30 s. 23 m (77 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Fresnel lens in use. Tower painted white, watch room buff, lantern black. Fresnel lens in use. The lighthouse is perched about half of the way up a steep promontory. The keeper's houses and other buildings, located above the lighthouse at the top of the bluff, are privately owned and were formerly operated as a bed and breakfast. Andy Radcliffe's photo is at right, Chris Gunns has a photo, the NLB web site also has a page on the lighthouse, Wikimedia has several photos, the aerial photos of Marinas.com give a good view of this beautiful site, Forand has a historic postcard view, Huelse also has a postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The 100th anniversary of the lighthouse was celebrated in April 2014. Located on a sharp cape about 6 km (4 mi) east of Ramsey. Site and tower closed, but there are good views from the road above the lighthouse. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. ARLHS IOM-010; Admiralty A4786; NGA 5036.
* Laxey Breakwater
1946. Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); green light, 2 s on, 1 s off. 4 m (13 ft) round masonry tower with a domed lantern; light shown through a window. Lighthouse painted white with a single horizontal green band. Sibling of Castle Jetty Light. Trabas has Fox's photo, a photo of both Laxey lights is available, and Google has a satellite view and a street view of the two Laxey lights. Located at the end of the breakwater at Laxey, about 10 km (6 mi) northeast of Douglas. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-018; Admiralty A4785; NGA 5032.
* Laxey Pier
1946 (station established 1891). Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); red light, 2 s on, 1 s off. 4 m (13 ft) round masonry tower with a domed lantern; light shown through a window. Lighthouse painted white with a single horizontal red band. Trabas has Fox's closeup photo, a photo of both Laxey lights is available, and Google has a satellite view and a street view of the two Laxey lights. Forand has a postcard view of the first light. Sibling of the Castle Jetty Light at Peel. Located at the end of the pier at Laxey, about 10 km (6 mi) northeast of Douglas. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-019; Admiralty A4784; NGA 5028.
Maughold Head Light
Maughold Head Light, Ramsey, July 2005
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Andy Radcliffe

Douglas (Middle Sheading) Lighthouses
Conister Rock (Tower of Refuge)
2008 (tower built in 1832). Active; focal plane about 11 m (36 ft); quick-flashing white light. The tower is also floodlit at night. Light mounted on the Tower of Refuge, a castle-like stone building. A night time photo is available, Trabas has Fox's photo, Wikimedia has Gregory Kingsley's photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on a rocky reef in Douglas Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty A4775.
* Battery Pier
Early 1960s. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); quick-flashing red light. Approx. 10 m (33 ft) round tapered stone tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with a single red horizontal band. The lantern is silvery metallic. Trabas has Fox's closeup photo, Phil Catterall has a 2009 photo, Glyn Baker has a photo, another closeup photo is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the end of a pier on the east side of Douglas Harbour; accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-007; Admiralty A4772; NGA 5000.
* [Douglas Herring Tower]
1811 (Thomas Brine). Daybeacon, never lit. Approx. 18 m (60 ft) round cylindrical, castellated stone tower, painted white. The tower is at the top of the hill in Nigel Williams's photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This tower and an identical tower at Langness were built as daybeacons and were never intended to be lighthouses. The towers are copies of a round tower at Peel Castle. In 1869 this tower was incorporated into the Douglas Head Hotel. The hotel was demolished in 1999, but the tower was retained. The site is now occupied by apartments. Located high atop Douglas Head just southwest of Douglas, the capital of the island. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown.
* Douglas Head (2)
1892 (David and Thomas Stevenson). Station established 1832 by the Isle of Man Harbour Board. Active; focal plane 32 m (104 ft); white flash every 10 s. 20 m (66 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, watch room buff, lantern black. Sealed-beam lamp array. 1-story keeper's houses and other buildings enclosed by a stone wall. Robat Williams's photo is at right, Geoff Coupe has a photo, Trabas has Fox's photo, the NLB web site has a page on the light station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Coakley has the history of the station and a photo of the 1832 lighthouse. Forand has historic postcard views of both the 1832 lighthouse and the present lighthouse, and Huelse also has postcard views of the 1832 and present lighthouses. The name "Douglas" is an Anglicized form of the Manx dubh glais, "black stream," a reference to a nearby creek. The original light was built by the Douglas Harbour Commission, and the station was transferred to NLB in 1859. In 2014, the keeper's house was listed for sale at £499,950. Located on the point below the heights of Douglas Head. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. ARLHS IOM-008; Admiralty A4770; NGA 4992.

Douglas Head Light
Douglas Head Light, Douglas, June 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Robat Williams


Rushen Sheading: South Coast Lighthouses
* Derbyhaven (Derby Haven)
1946. Active; focal plane 5 m (16 ft); green light, 1 s on, 1 s off. Approx. 3.5 m (12 ft) round masonry tower with a domed top; the light is shown through a window. Lighthouse painted white with a single horizontal green band. Sibling of Irish Quay Light in Castletown. Trabas has Fox's closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. According to Isle of Man Harbours, a light was established at Derbyhaven in 1650, which would make it the earliest known light on the island. Findlay's 1879 light list mentions a breakwater light established in 1850. Located at the end of the detached breakwater in Derbyhaven; accessible with caution at low tide by walking across the exposed beach to the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-005; Admiralty A4764; NGA 4988.
* [Derby Fort]
Late 1700s. Inactive since the late 1800s. This light was mounted on Derby Fort, a round tower built in 1645. Ruins of the tower survive. Wikimedia has Richard Hoare's photo and another photo by Chris Gunns, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. Located on St. Michael's Isle, a small island off the northern tip of the Langness Peninsula east of Derbyhaven. The island is attached to the mainland by a causeway. Site open.
* [Langness Herring Tower]
1811 (Thomas Brine). Daybeacon, never lit. Approx. 18 m (60 ft) cylindrical, castellated stone tower, unpainted. Another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This tower and an identical tower at Douglas Head were built specifically as daybeacons. The towers are copies of a round tower at Peel Castle. Located about 200 m (220 yd) behind Langness Light (next entry). Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown.
* Langness
1880 (David and Thomas Stevenson). Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); two white flashes, separated by 5.1 s, every 30 s. 19 m (63 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, watch room buff, lantern black. Twin 300 mm lens, one mounted above the other. 1-story keeper's houses and other buildings enclosed by a stone wall. Fog signal building with intact horn (fog signal discontinued in 1987). Phil Catterall's photo is at the top of this page, Grant Matthews has a good photo, the NLB web site also has a good page on the light station, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Langness ("Long Point") is a slender peninsula hanging from the southeastern corner of the Isle of Man. For a number of years British TV personality Jeremy Clarkson owned much of the surrounding land and attempted to close access to the lighthouse, but in May 2010 he was ordered to reopen traditional pathways leading to the light. In 2014 the keeper's cottages were renovated for overnight accommodations. Located on the east side of Dreswick Point, the southern point of the peninsula, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) south of Derbyhaven. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. Site manager: Langness Lighthouse Cottages . ARLHS IOM-009; Admiralty A4762; NGA 4984.
* Castletown Irish Quay
1944. Active; focal plane 5 m (16 ft); red light, 3 s on, 1 s off. Approx. 3.5 m (12 ft) round masonry tower with a domed top; the light is shown through a window. Lighthouse painted white with a single horizontal red band. Dave Abreu has a photo of both Castletown lights, Trabas has Fox's closeup photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a street view of the two Castletown lights. Located at the end of Irish Quay in Castletown; accessible by walking the quay. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-017; Admiralty A4761; NGA 4976.
* Castletown New Pier (2?)
1849 (station established 1765). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); red light, 13 s on, 2 s off. Approx. 7 m (23 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with a domed top; the light is shown through a window. Lighthouse painted white with a single horizontal red band. Paul Dyer has a dramatic photo, Dave Abreu has a photo of both Castletown lights, Trabas has Fox's closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view and a street view of the two Castletown lights. Located at the end of the pier in Castletown; accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-002; Admiralty A4760; NGA 4972.
* Port St. Mary Inner Pierhead (2)
1897 (station established 1812). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); red light, 2 s on, 1 s off. 7 m (23 ft) octagonal cylindrical masonry tower with a domed, enclosed top, painted white with a single narrow horizontal red band. Trabas has Fox's photo (also seen at right), Forand has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the end of the inner pier of Port St. Mary; accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-023; Admiralty A4756; NGA 4964.
#Alfred Pier (1)
1943 (station established 1884). Destroyed in 2009. 7 m (23 ft) hexagonal cast iron tower with lantern, painted white with a single horizontal red band. Trabas has Fox's photo of the replacement light (focal plane 8 m (26 ft); red light, 6 s on, 4 s off) on a simple mast, and Google has a satellite view. An unusually high tide and a strong wind combined to wash the lighthouse into the sea during the night of 11-12 January 2009. Previously located at the end of the outer pier of Port St. Mary. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-026; Admiralty A4754; NGA 4968.
Port St. Mary Inner Pierhead Light
Port St. Mary Inner Pierhead Light
photo copyright Fred Fox; used by permission

Rushen Sheading: Calf of Man Lighthouses
Chicken Rock
1875 (David and Thomas Stevenson). Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); white flash every 5 s. 44 m (143 ft) tapered round granite tower with lantern and gallery, incorporating keeper's quarters. Tower unpainted, lantern painted black. Twin 300 mm lenses (1999). Fog horn (blast every 60 s). Trabas has Fox's photo (also seen at right), a fine 2007 photo is available, Dave Brooks has a closeup, Wikimedia has photos, and NLB also has a good page on the light station and its history. Chicken Rock is an isolated bare rock about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) south of Calf of Man; the lighthouse was built when it became clear that the Calf of Man lights were not sufficient to warn ships away from the area. The shore station was originally at Calf of Man but was moved to Port St. Mary in 1886. The interior of the lighthouse was heavily damaged by fire on 23 December 1960, leading to automation of the light in 1961. Located on the rock, swept by the waves; the lowest 10 m (33 ft) of the tower is solid granite. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. ARLHS IOM-003; Admiralty A4748; NGA 4956.
Calf of Man (1) Low
1819 (Robert Stevenson). Inactive since 1875. Approx. 15 m (50 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, connected by a covered walway to a 2-story stone keeper's house. The keeper's house continued in service until 1912, but is now in poor condition. M.J. Richardson has a photo, Andy Stephenson has a photo showing the Chicken Rock lighthouse in the distance, and Google has a satellite view. Calf of Man is a small island off the southern tip of the Isle of Man. It is a bird sanctuary, but tours are available from Port Erin. The two 1818 lighthouses were deactivated in favor of the Chicken Rock Light in 1875. Although they are very sturdily built, they are now endangered by long abandonment. Located near the southern end of the island, facing Chicken Rock. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Manx National Trust. ARLHS IOM-031.
Calf of Man (2)
1968 (P.H. Hyslop). Inactive since 2007. 11 m (36 ft) octagonal cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery mounted at one corner of 1-story granite service building. Brad Ackerman has a photo of all three Calf of Man lighthouses, another distant view of the three lighthouses is available, and Google has a satellite view. After the fire at Chicken Rock Light in late 1960, the Northern Lighthouse Board studied navigational needs in the area and decided to automate Chicken Rock and build this lighthouse. The fog signal at this light was discontinued in July 2005, and the light was deactivated in June 2007. Located between the two 1818 towers. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. ARLHS IOM-001; ex-Admiralty A4746; ex-NGA 4948.
Chicken Rock Light
Chicken Rock Light
photo copyright Fred Fox; used by permission
Calf of Man (1) High
1819 (Robert Stevenson). Inactive since 1875. Approx. 18 m (60 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery. The 2-story keeper's house continued in service until 1886; it is now in poor condition. M.J. Richardson has a closeup photo, Brad Ackerman has a photo, Andy Stephenson has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located 170 m (560 ft) north of the low light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Manx National Trust. ARLHS IOM-030.
Thousla Rock
1981. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); red flash every 3 s. 9 m (30 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower, painted white; base is black. No lantern; the light is displayed from a short mast atop the tower. Trabas has Fox's closeup photo, David Dixon has a photo, M.J. Richardson has a distant view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view from the mainland. Located on a rock in Calf Sound, the channel separating Isle of Man and Calf of Man. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator: Northern Lighthouse Board. ARLHS IOM-025; Admiralty A4745; NGA 4952.

Rushen Sheading: Port Erin Lighthouses
* Raglin Pier
1916. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); green light, occulting once every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white with a green horizontal band around the lower part of the lantern. Trabas has Fox's photo, a sunset photo is available, Forand has a historic postcard view, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. Located at the end of a stone pier on the waterfront in Port Erin. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-022; Admiralty A4744; NGA 4944.
* Port Erin Range Front (2)
Date unknown (station established 1884). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); continuous red light. 11 m (36 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern. Tower painted white with a single red horizontal band. Richard Hoare's photo is at right, Trabas has Fox's photo, Paul Sandham has a closeup, a more distant view is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The rear light is on a streetlight-style pole. Forand has a postcard view of an earlier light on a skeletal tower, and Huelse has a second postcard view. Located on the waterfront in Port Erin, at the southwestern corner of the island. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-014; Admiralty A4740; NGA 4936.

Peel (Glenfaba Sheading) Lighthouses
* Peel Breakwater
Date unknown (station active by the 1850s). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white light, 5 s on, 2 s off. 8 m (26 ft) octagonal cast iron tower with lantern. Tower painted white with a horizontal black band at the base. Trabas has Fox's photo, Ted Sarah also has a closeup photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Peel is the principal harbor on the west coast of the Isle of Man. The harbor is partly sheltered by St. Patrick's Isle, a small island crowned by Peel Castle. The lighthouse is located at the end of a stone breakwater extending northeastward from St. Patrick's Isle. Accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-020; Admiralty A4734; NGA 4924.
Port Erin Front Light
Port Erin Range Front Light, Port Erin, February 2010
Geograph Creative Commons photo by Richard Hoare
* Peel Castle Jetty
1946. Active; focal plane 5 m (17 ft); green light, 5 s on, 2 s off. 4 m (13 ft) round masonry tower with a small domed lantern; light shown through a window in the lantern. Tower painted with narrow green and white horizontal bands; lantern unpainted aluminum (?). Trabas has Fox's photo, Derek Tootill has a photo, another photo is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand also has a postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the end of a stone jetty at the southeastern corner of St. Patrick's Isle, marking the west side of the entrance to Peel's inner harbor. Accessible by walking the jetty. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-012; Admiralty A4732; NGA 4932.
* Peel Pierhead (2)
Date unknown (station established 1811). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); red light, 5 s on, 2 s off. Light mounted atop the roof of a 2-story harbor master's office. No lantern. Trabas has Fox' closeup photo, a 2010 photo is available, Andrew Abbott has a view from the harbor, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Forand has a historic postcard view of the original lighthouse. Located at the end of the pier on the east side of the entrance to Peel's inner harbor. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Operator: Isle of Man Harbours. ARLHS IOM-027; Admiralty A4730; NGA 4928.
* Peel Promenade (Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); red flash every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) hexagonal cupola centered on a 1-story building. Trabas has Fox's photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The front light is on a post on a breakwater. Located on the seaside promenade in Peel. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty A4731.1.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

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Adjoining pages: North: Southwestern Scotland | East: Northwestern England | West: Northern Ireland

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Posted October 28, 2004. Checked and revised July 14, 2014. Lighthouses: 26. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.