Lighthouses of the United States: Southern Maine

The U.S. state of Maine is located in the northeastern corner of the nation. The rugged, deeply indented coast of the state has about 70 lighthouses, which are covered by the Directory on two pages. This page includes lighthouses of the southern coast of Maine, from the Camden and Rockland area south to the border of New Hampshire.

Lighthouse preservation is very strong in Maine, as evidenced by the large number of local preservation societies and trusts. The Maine Lights program, passed by Congress in 1996, led to the transfer of 28 lighthouses from the Coast Guard to local preservation groups or other agencies and served as a model for the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act of 2000. Except for eight privately-owned towers, all but a handful of Maine's lighthouses now have local support groups. In addition, two powerful national forces for lighthouse preservation, the American Lighthouse Foundation and Lighthouse Digest magazine, are based in Maine.

Aids to navigation in Maine are maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard First District, but ownership (and sometimes operation) of historic lighthouses has been transferred to local authorities and preservation organizations in many cases.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volumes H and J of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. USCG numbers are from Vol. I of the USCG Light List.

General Sources
New England Lighthouses: A Virtual Guide - Maine
Extensive data, historical accounts, and photos for all of the lighthouses.
Maine Lighthouses
Photos of Maine lighthouses from Kraig Anderson's LighthouseFriends.com site.
Online List of Lights - Maine
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Lighthouses in Maine
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses in Maine
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Coast Guard Lighthouses - Maine
Historic photos and notes posted by the U.S. Coast Guard Historian's office.
Leuchttürme USA auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images of U.S. lighthouses posted by Klaus Huelse.
National Maritime Inventory - Maine
Inventory of Maine lighthouse data.
Lighthouses of Maine
From Lighthouse Getaway (Bill Britten, University of Tennessee): photos and brief accounts of many of the lighthouses.

Monhegan Light
Monhegan Light, Monhegan Island, July 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Timothy Valentine

Western Knox County Lighthouses

Note: Knox County extends eastward across lower Penobscot Bay to include Isle au Haut, Vinalhaven Island, and Matinicus Island. Lighthouses of those islands and their surroundings are described on the Eastern Maine page.
Camden and Rockland Area Lighthouses
Curtis Island (Negro Island) (2)
1896 (station established 1835). Active; focal plane 52 ft (16 m); green light occults every 4 s. 25 ft (7.5 m) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery; solar-powered 300 mm lens (1994). Tower painted white, lantern and gallery black. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Camden Public Library. The original 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house, occupied by a caretaker, has a conspicuous red roof. Barn (1889), oil house (1895), and other light station buildings. Britten has a good photo, Anderson has a fine page with good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. The lighthouse was automated in 1972, and the town acquired the station except for the light tower in that year. The lighthouse itself was transferred to the town in 1998 under the Maine Lights program. The island was renamed in 1934 for Cyrus Curtis, a town resident and publisher of the Saturday Evening Post. Located on an island in the entrance to Camden Harbor from West Penobscot Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open (city park), tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Town of Camden. ARLHS USA-213; Admiralty J0096; USCG 1-4310.
Indian Island (2)
1874 (station established 1850). Inactive since 1934. 31 ft (9.5 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. Oil house (1894). Sue Clark's photo is at right, Anderson's page has several photos, Lighthouse Digest has an article on life at the light station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The station has been a private residence since it was deactivated in 1934; it is very well maintained. Located on a small island off Beauchamp Point at the entrance to Rockport Harbor. Accessible only by boat. Many cruises and boat tours pass the site; there are views also from Rockport Marine Park. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-400.
* Rockland Harbor Breakwater
1902. Active; focal plane 39 ft (12 m); white flash every 5 s. 25 ft (7.5 m) square cylindrical red brick tower with lantern and gallery rising from one corner of a 1-1/2 story red brick and white wood keeper's house; VRB-25 lens. Tower unpainted red brick; lantern painted black. Fog horn (blast every 15 s). Original fog signal building attached to tower. Steve Dorsey's photo is at right, Anderson has a good page with photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was transferred to the city under the Maine Lights program in 1998, but it was in poor condition. The American Lighthouse Foundation launched fundraising to restore and operate the lighthouse, and in 1999 a local support group, Friends of the Rockland Breakwater Lighthouse, was formed to carry out this effort. In July 2001 the friends group leased the lighthouse from the city. At that time about half the $250,000 needed for restoration was in hand. Restoration work began in September 2003 and has continued for a decade, carried out mostly by volunteers. Located at the end of a 4500 ft stone breakwater at Jameson Point, near the end of Samoset Road in Rockland. Accessible in good weather by walking the breakwater; good views also from the state ferries to North Haven and Vinalhaven. Site open, building and tower closed except for occasional open house tours. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: City of Rockland. Site manager: Friends of the Rockland Harbor Lights. ARLHS USA-699; Admiralty J0102; USCG 1-4130.
Rockland Harbor Southwest
1987. Active (privately maintained); focal plane 44 ft (13.5 m); yellow flash every 2.5 s. Square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted gray, rising from a 2-story unpainted shingled residence. 5th order Fresnel lens transferred in 1989 from Doubling Point Range Lights. Anderson has closeup photos, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was built by Dr. Bruce Woolett and accepted by the Coast Guard as a privately maintained aid to navigation. It was sold in 1998; the new owner, John Gazzola, renovated the building and added the shingled siding. Located at the end of Sherman's Lane, off North Shore Drive (the road to Owl's Head) on the south side of Rockland. Site and tower closed (private residence). Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-1021; Admiralty J0103.4; USCG 1-4140.

Indian Island Light
Indian Island Light, Rockland, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Sue Clark

Rockland Harbor Light
Rockland Harbor Breakwater Light, Rockland, October 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Steve Dorsey

* Owl's Head (2)
1852 (station established 1826). Active; focal plane 100 ft (30.5 m); continuous white light, displayed day and night. 30 ft (9 m) round old-style brick tower with lantern and gallery; 4th order Fresnel lens (1856). Tower painted white, lantern and gallery black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 20 s). 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1854) used as Coast Guard housing. Oil house (1895). C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, Mike Ladd has a 2007 photo, Anderson has a page with good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was a similar rubblestone tower. The present light is a picturesque, well preserved, well known, and well visited lighthouse. The state administers the surrounding area as Owls Head State Park. In December 2007, the American Lighthouse Foundation secured a license from the Coast Guard to manage and restore the lighthouse. In 2009, the lighthouse was one of three benefiting from a $380,000 federal grant to the Foundation. Work was underway in April 2010 to restore the brickwork and windows. In late 2012, the American Lighthouse Foundation leased the keeper's house to use as its headquarters and as an interpretive center. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road in Owl's Head. Accessible by a short hike from the parking area. There are also good views from the Rockland-Vinalhaven state ferry. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: American Lighthouse Foundation and Friends of the Rockland Harbor Lights. ARLHS USA-574; Admiralty J0104; USCG 1-4105.
Owl's Head Light
Owl's Head Light, Owl's Head, October 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey

St. George Area Lighthouses
Two Bush Island
1897. Active; focal plane 65 ft (20 m); white flash every 5 s (red sector covers west and north). 42 ft (13 m) square brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a brick fog signal building; VRB-25 lens. Buildings painted white, lantern and gallery black. Fog horn (blast every 15 s). The keeper's house was demolished in 1970. Anderson's page also has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the complete station. The historic fog bell now hangs in the steeple of the Spruce Head Community Church. In 2000 the Coast Guard replaced the DCB-224 aerobeacon with a weaker flashing light powered by solar panels. Located on a small island about 4 miles (6.5 km) southeast of Spruce Head. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Site manager: Maine Islands National Wildlife Refuge. ARLHS USA-860; Admiralty J0120; USCG 1-4540.
Whitehead Island (3)
1852 (station established 1804). Active; focal plane 75 ft (23 m); green light occulting every 4 s, day and night. 41 ft (12.5 m) unpainted round granite tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a red brick service room; 300 mm lens (1982). Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s). The original 3rd order Fresnel lens is on display at the Maine Lighthouse Museum in Rockland. 1-1/2 story wood assistant keeper's house (1891); the principal keeper's house has been demolished. Square brick fog signal building (1888), oil house (1891), boathouse, and other light station buildings. Anderson's page also has good photos, Lighthouse Digest has an August 2000 story on the history of the light station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a wood tower, was replaced by a stone tower in 1830. Transferred under the Maine Lights program in 1998, this light station became part of a summer camp for high schoolers, who helped restore the historic buildings. Starting in August 2008, the keeper's house has been used for educational programs for adults. Located on an island 2 miles (3 km) south of Spruce Head. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed to the public. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: Pine Island Camp. Site manager: Whitehead Light Station. ARLHS USA-888; Admiralty J0122; USCG 1-4580.
Tenants Harbor
1857. Inactive since 1933. 27 ft (8 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. Buildings painted white, lantern and gallery black. Anderson's page has several good photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This light station is a private residence owned by the artist Jamie Wyeth. Wyeth has reconstructed the square pyramidal wood bell tower and uses it as his studio. Located at the eastern tip of Southern Island, off the entrance to Tenants Harbor. Visible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-840.
*** Marshall Point (2)
1857 (station established 1832). Active; focal plane 30 ft (9 m), continuous white light, day and night. 31 ft (9.5 m) round tower with lantern and gallery, lower part granite blocks and upper part brick, connected to land by a wooden walkway; 300 mm lens (1981). Upper part of tower and walkway painted white, lantern and gallery black. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1895); the lower floor houses the Marshall Point Lighthouse Museum, and the upper floor is a caretaker's residence. Fog signal building demolished, but the original bell (1898) is on display. Oil house (1898) and reconstructed kitchen (1995). Justin Russell's photo is at right, Anderson has an excellent page for the lighthouse, Britten has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view as well as a street view of the keeper's house. The restoration effort began in 1986, when the Town of St. George leased the station from the Coast Guard. The St. George Historical Society restored the tower and keeper's house in 1988-89 and opened the museum in 1990. In 1995 the summer kitchen was reconstructed to provide space for more exhibits. In 1998, ownership of the station was transferred to the town under the Maine Lights program. This lighthouse appears in the 1993 movie Forrest Gump as the eastern end of Gump's cross-country run. Located at the end of Marshall Point Road in Port Clyde. Site open, museum open daily June through September and on weekends in May and October, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: Town of St. George. Site manager: Marshall Point Lighthouse Museum. ARLHS USA-479; Admiralty J0124; USCG 1-4780.

Marshall Point Light, St. George, March 2003
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Justin Russell
Franklin Island (3)
1855 (station established 1807). Active; focal plane 57 ft (17 m); white flash every 6 s. 45 ft (14 m) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery; solar-powered 250 mm lens. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery gray; lantern roof is red. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Boothbay Harbor Coast Guard Station. The keeper's house was demolished in 1967; the oil house (1895) survives but without its roof. Anderson's page has recent photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the complete station. In August 1999 the Coast Guard contracted with Franklin Light Preservation to maintain the lighthouse. In 2001 the group rebuilt the Coast Guard pier and built a helipad on the island for ready access to the light. In December 2003 the Maine Department of Environmental Protection ordered these improvements removed, because the group had no DEP permits for them. Located on a small island in the mouth of Muscongus Bay about 4.5 miles (7 km) southwest of Port Clyde. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Franklin Light Preservation. ARLHS USA-309; Admiralty J0132; USCG 1-4980.

Lincoln County Lighthouses

Monhegan Island and Bristol Area Lighthouses
Note: Monhegan is a small island located about 14 mi (22 km) southeast of Pemaquid Point and a similar distance south of Port Clyde. The permanent population is about 75. The island is accessible by passenger ferry from Port Clyde year round, or from New Harbor or Boothbay Harbor in season.
** Monhegan (2)
1850 (station established 1824). Active; focal plane 178 ft (54 m); white flash every 15 s. 47 ft (14 m) old-style unpainted round granite block tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a workshed; solar-powered VRB-25 aerobeacon. Lantern black with a red roof. The 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1874) is now a museum. Oil house (1893?) and other original buildings preserved; the 1857 assistant keeper's house was reconstructed in 1997-98. The fog bell (1855) from the nearby Manana Island fog signal station is on display. The passageway connecting the lighthouse and keeper's quarters has been rebuilt. Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Britten has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located atop the rocky island of Monhegan, about 1/2 mile (800 m) from the ferry dock. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Monhegan Museum. ARLHS USA-509; Admiralty J0128; USCG 1-0020.
[Manana Island Fog Signal]
1889 (station established 1855). Active, solar-powered fog horn (two 3 s blasts every 60 s). Original (1855) 2-story wood keeper's house. 1-story brick fog signal building (1889). The assistant keeper's house has been demolished, but several other smaller station buildings survive. R. Boltz has a photo, Chris Sanfino has a 2010 photo, and Google has a satellite view. There was never a lighted aid to navigation at this station. In late 2012 the station was listed for sale at auction, and in July 2013 it sold for $199,000. Located on the west side of a small island across a narrow channel west of Monhegan Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, station building closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 1-0025.
**** Pemaquid Point (2)
1835 (Joseph Berry; station established 1827). Active; focal plane 79 ft (24 m); white flash every 6 s. 38 ft (11. 5 m) old-style round rubblestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1857); 4th order Fresnel lens (1856). Buildings painted white; lantern and gallery are black. The keeper's houses is now the Fishermen's Museum; a 4th order Fresnel lens from Baker Island Light (see the Eastern Maine page) is on display. Brick fog signal building with bell. The brick oil house (1896) was damaged by a storm in 1991 but repaired in 1992. Marco Mazzei's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page with photos, the Town of Bristol has a page for the lighthouse, there are great photos from Britten, Marinas.com has aerial photos, a webcam provides a current view of the lighthouse, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a very distant street view. This well known and popular lighthouse is depicted on a U.S. quarter dollar coin. In 2000, the Coast Guard refurbished the light tower and then leased it to the American Lighthouse Foundation for preservation. ALF has organized the Friends of Pemaquid Point Lighthouse to work for restoration and maintenance of the tower. In 2002, volunteers of the New England Lighthouse Lovers (NELL) painted the tower. In 2003, FPPL volunteers began conducting tours of the tower. In February 2007, the National Trust for Historic Preservation announced a grant of $50,000 to restore the exterior masonry of the tower. In 2009, the lighthouse was one of three benefiting from a $380,000 federal grant to ALF. A thorough restoration by the J.B. Leslie Company was completed by June 2010. Located just beyond the end of ME 130 south of New Harbor, about 1 km (0.6 mi) northeast of the southernmost point of land. Site open, museum open daily in the summer, tower open daily from Memorial Day (late May) through Columbus Day (mid October). Owner: U.S. Coast Guard (tower only) and Town of Bristol. Site manager: Friends of Pemaquid Point Lighthouse (tower only) and Fishermen's Museum. ARLHS USA-589; Admiralty J0134; USCG 1-5145.

Pemaquid Point Light, August 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Marco Mazzei

Boothbay Harbor Area Lighthouses
Ram Island
1883. Active; focal plane 36 ft (11 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 35 ft (11 m) round tower with lantern and gallery, lower part unpainted granite blocks and upper part brick painted white; 250 mm lens. Lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Boothbay Region Historical Society Museum in Boothbay Harbor. The original 1-1/2 story wood keeper's quarters houses a caretaker in season. Barn (1883) and brick oil house (1898). Anderson's page has good photos, and Google has a satellite view. Not to be confused with the Ram Island Ledge Light (see below). The Grand Banks Schooner Museum leased the light station, except for the tower, in 1983, when the Coast Guard was about to demolish the keeper's house. The Museum Trust organized the Ram Island Preservation Society, which has restored the house. In 1998, the Trust received ownership of the entire station under the Maine Lights program. The walkway connecting the lighthouse to shore, which had been removed by the Coast Guard in 1977, was rebuilt during 2002. Located on a small island next to Fisherman Island Passage, the eastern entrance to Boothbay Harbor, opposite Ocean Point. Accessible only by boat. The Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers cruises to the island in season. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Grand Banks Schooner Museum Trust. Site manager: Ram Island Preservation Society. ARLHS USA-686; Admiralty J0136; USCG 1-5420.
** Burnt Island
1821. Active; focal plane 61 ft (18.5 m); red flash every 6 s; two white sectors cover clear channels. 30 ft (9 m) round rubblestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1857); 300 mm lens. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery black. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). The 4th order Fresnel lens used from 1857(?) to 1961 is on display at the Maine Lighthouse Museum in Rockland. Nicholas Danforth's photo is at right, the state has a web site for the lighthouse, Anderson has a good page for it, Lighthouse Digest has a June 2004 feature article, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The third-oldest Maine lighthouse, this is a well preserved light station with the original oil house (1899), boathouse (1880), barn (1877), and other structures. The Burnt Island Lighthouse Society works for preservation and operation of the light. The state has developed the site as a "living lighthouse," where visitors can see a nineteenth century light station in action. Restoration began in 1999 with tree clearing and utilities work and continued in 2000 with replacement of the roof, restoration of chimneys and fireplaces, painting, and installation of a heating system. Interior restoration was completed in 2001. The light station was rededicated on 20 June 2003. Located on an island in the entrance to Boothbay Harbor. Accessible only by boat; tours available weekdays from Boothbay Harbor. The Maine Maritime Museum in Bath also offers cruises to the island in season. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Maine Department of Marine Resources. Site manager: Burnt Island Living Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-097; Admiralty J0140; USCG 1-5520.
Burnt Island Light
Burnt Island Light, Boothbay Harbor, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Nicholas Danforth
The Cuckolds
1907 (built as a fog signal station 1892, lantern added 1907). Active; focal plane 59 ft (18 m); 2 white flashes every 6 s. Unique design: 48 ft (14.5 m) overall; round wood fog signal station with granite foundation with short white octagonal tower, with lantern and gallery, mounted at the peak of the conical red roof; solar-powered VRB-25 aerobeacon (1998). Lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (blast every 15 s). The 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house, formerly attached, was demolished after severe damage from a blizzard (1978). The original (and rare) American-made 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Maine Lighthouse Museum in Rockland. A photo is at right, Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. In 2006, the light station was transferred to a local preservation group under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act. By 2014 the light station had been restored, reopening as a bread and breakfast inn. Located on a small island off Cape Newagen, between Boothbay Harbor and the Kennebec River. Accessible only by boat. Visible from the public pier in Newagen. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Cuckolds Fog Signal and Light Station Council. ARLHS USA-210; Admiralty J0142; U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 1-5485.
Hendricks Head (2)
1875 (station established 1829). Reactivated (inactive 1933-1951); focal plane 43 ft (13.5 m); continuous light, white to the east and red to the west. 39 ft (12 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery; 250 mm lens (1979). Tower painted white, lantern and gallery black. The original 2-story wood keeper's house is used as a private summer residence. Buildings painted white with red roofs. Brick oil house (1895) and other buildings. Pyramidal wood fog bell tower (1890), recently rebuilt. Lighthouse Digest has an article on the history of the light station, Anderson has a fine page with several views from the sea, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. The station was deactivated and sold in 1933 to reduce costs; it was reactivated in 1951, when electricity became available at the site, in response to many public requests. The blizzard of January 9, 1978, destroyed the boathouse and the covered walkway that connected the house and the fog bell tower. The present owners, Luanne and Ben Russell, have renovated the entire light station and have a web site for it. Located off ME 27 on Sheepscot Bay in West Southport. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-597; Admiralty J0144; USCG 1-5665.
Cuckolds Light
Cuckolds Light, Boothbay Harbor, May 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by hatchski

Sagadahoc County Lighthouses

Kennebec River Lighthouses
Note: The Kennebec River is navigable for fairly large ships for about 15 miles (25 km) to the traditional shipbuilding town of Bath. Above Bath, the estuary widens into Merrymeeting Bay, a drowned valley. The lighthouses of the river are listed south to north.
Perkins Island
1898. Active; focal plane 41 ft (12.5 m); red flash every 2.5 s; 2 white sectors cover clear channel. 23 ft (7 m) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; 250 mm lens. Lantern painted black. Original 2 story wood keeper's house, pyramidal wood bell tower, brick oil house, and other buildings. The original fog bell is on display at Georgetown High School. The light station, except for the tower, was transferred to the state in the 1960s. Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Endangered: the light station, especially the keeper's house and bell tower, is in disrepair due to lack of maintenance. Except for the light tower, the station was transferred to the State of Maine in the 1960s. Lighthouse Digest had an October 2000 story on the sad state of the light station and placed the lighthouse on the Doomsday List. In 2000, the lighthouse (but not the rest of the station) was leased by the American Lighthouse Foundation for preservation. The new ALF chapter, Friends of Perkins Island Lighthouse, hopes to restore the keeper's quarters and in 2000 local volunteers did restore the fog bell tower. In 2005 and 2006 chapter members worked to stabilize the keeper's house, repairing the most urgent problems. A more complete restoration was carried out in fall 2014. Located on an island on the east side of the Kennebec opposite Parker Head. Accessible only by boat. Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers cruises passing the light. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: U.S. Coast Guard (tower) and Maine Department of Natural Resources. Site manager: Friends of Perkins Island Lighthouse (tower) and Maine Department of Natural Resources. ARLHS USA-596; Admiralty J0152; USCG 1-6070.
* Squirrel Point
1898. Active; focal plane 33 ft (10 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off; white sector covers clear channel. 25 ft (7.5 m) octagonal wooden tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached to the fog signal building; 250 mm lens. Lantern painted black. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). The original 5th order Fresnel lens is on display at Portland Head Light (see below). Original 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house, privately restored. Brick oil house (1906) and other buildings. A photo is at right, Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, and Google has a satellite view. Sibling of Perkins Island Light. In 1996 Congress directed the Coast Guard to convey the property to Mike Trenholm and his nonprofit organization, Squirrel Point Light Associates, Inc. In early 1999 the lighthouse was reported for sale. This stirred up a controversy, but the owner claimed the lighthouse was never on the market. However, in 2002 the lighthouse was indeed listed for sale, and controversy began anew. When the Coast Guard indicated it would allow a sale to a retired naval officer, a new group, Citizens for Squirrel Point, sued to block the sale. Reversing course, the Coast Guard joined the suit and asked the court to recover the property because the owners had violated the terms of the 1996 transfer. In February 2005 a judge approved a magistrate's decision that the property should revert to the federal government. In early 2008, the Coast Guard leased the station to the Chewonki Foundation, which specializes in land conservation in Maine. The foundation helped plan a restoration, but in 2013 it surrendered its lease, and the Coast Guard leased the station to the Citizens for Squirrel Point Light. Action has been taken to secure the buildings, and restoration plans have been prepared. Located on Arrowsic Island on the east side of the Kennebec opposite Phippsburg. Accessible by a short trail from the end of Bald Head Road in Arrowsic, and the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers cruises passing the light. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Citizens for Squirrel Point Light. ARLHS USA-788; Admiralty J0156; USCG 1-6100.

Squirrel Point Light, Arrowsic, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by mmwm
* Doubling Point Range Front
1898. Active; focal plane 18 ft (5.5 m) quick-flashing white light seen only on the range line. 13 ft (4 m) octagonal wood tower, painted white with a red pyramidal roof, mounted on a granite foundations; 250 mm lens. One of the original 5th order Fresnel lenses from this range was transferred to the Rockland Harbor Southwest Light (see above). Original 2-story wood keeper's quarters (occupied by caretaker) and other buildings. Anderson has a fine page for the lights, and Google has a satellite view. In 1998, the lights and the nearby fog signal were transferred to a new preservation group, the Range Light Keepers, under the Maine Lights program. Located off Doubling Point Road, on the east side of the Kennebec River off ME 127 near the northwest corner of Arrowsic Island. The Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers cruises passing the light. Site open with permission of caretaker, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Range Light Keepers. ARLHS USA-415; Admiralty J0160; USCG 1-6135.
* Doubling Point Range Rear
1898. Active; focal plane 33 ft (10 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off, seen only on the range line. 13 ft (4 m) octagonal wood tower, painted white with a red pyramidal roof, mounted on a granite foundation; 250 mm lens. An overhanging tree hides the light in Google's satellite view. The Coast Guard restored the rear tower in 1996. Located about 800 ft (240 m) north of the front light. Site open with permission of caretaker, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Range Light Keepers. ARLHS USA-973; Admiralty J0160.1; USCG 1-6140.
[Fiddler's Reach Fog Signal]
1913. Inactive since 1972 (at least). Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal shingle-covered wood tower. The tower was restored in 2000. A Nebraska museum has loaned a fog bell for the tower; the original bell is on display at the U.S. Coast Guard Museum in New London, Connecticut. Located about 1100 ft (335 m) upstream from the Doubling Point Range Lights; Google has an indistinct satellite view. Site status unknown; may be accessible only by boat. Owner/site manager: Range Light Keepers.
Doubling Point
1899. Active; focal plane 23 ft (7 m); white flash every 4 s. 23 ft (7 m) octagonal wooden tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a square unpainted granite foundation; 300 mm lens. Lantern painted black. Sibling of Perkins Island. The 5th order Fresnel lens (1902) is on display at the Maine Lighthouse Museum in Rockland. Original 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house and bell tower. Sue Clark's photo is at right, Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was previously endangered by ice damage to its foundation. Restoration of the foundation was completed in January 2000, and the walkway to the light was restored in summer 2000. Located on the east side of the Kennebec River, at the end of Doubling Point Road off ME 127 near the northwest corner of Arrowsic Island, upstream from the range lights (see below). Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers harbor cruises daily in season to the vicinity of the light. Site open (limited parking), tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Friends of Doubling Point Light. ARLHS USA-234; Admiralty J0166; USCG 1-6145.
[Abagadasset Point Range]
1903. Inactive since the late 1930s. Originally this station had two post lights and a keeper's house. Ruins of the brick oil house and the base of the front light are reported to survive. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view of the point. Located at Abagadasset Point, on the west side of Merrymeeting Bay off the end of Browns Point Road east of Bowdoinham. Site closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS USA-1018.
Doubling Point Light
Doubling Point Light, Arrowsic, August 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Sue Clark

Kennebec Entrance Lighthouses
* Fort Popham (3)
1940s. Active; focal plane 27 ft (8 m); green flash every 4 s. Light mounted on a short mast atop the historic fort. This light replaced a pyramidal wooden tower (1903). Lighthouse Digest has a March 2005 story on life at this station, Trabas has a photo, a 2008 photo is available (light at upper right corner of the photo), and Google has a satellite view and a street view of the fort. Located on the west side of the mouth of the Kennebec River. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands. Site manager: Fort Popham State Historic Site. ARLHS USA-1205; Admiralty J0150; USCG 1-6050.
Pond Island (2)
1855 (station established 1821). Active; focal plane 52 ft (16 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 20 ft (6 m) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; solar-powered 250 mm lens. Lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s). The keeper's house and all the other light station buildings were demolished in 1963. Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on an island in the mouth of the Kennebec southeast of Popham Beach. The island is an important bird sanctuary and is closed to the public April through August. Accessible only by boat. Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers cruises passing the light. Site open September through March but difficult to reach; tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Maine Audubon Society and Pond Island National Wildlife Refuge. ARLHS USA-1145; Admiralty J0148; USCG 1-6025.
* Seguin Island (3)
1857 (station established 1795). Active; focal plane 180 ft (55 m); continuous white light. 53 ft (16 m) round cylindrical granite tower with lantern and gallery, original Henry Lepaute 1st order Fresnel lens (the only 1st order lens in Maine). Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 20 s). Original 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house, brick fog signal building (1889), brick oil house (1892), and other buildings. The keeper's house is occupied by volunteer caretakers in season. Sue Clark's photo is at right, Anderson also has a good page with excellent photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. This is one of Maine's best known and most important lighthouses, and the highest in the state. In 1999-2000 the lighthouse was the subject of debate between preservationists and the Coast Guard, which wanted to extinguish the light and put up a solar-powered skeletal tower. In March 2000, under pressure from Congress and the public, the Guard dropped its plans to deactivate the light. Current projects include restoring the boat house and tramway engine house. In 2006, the Coast Guard carried out a restoration of the 1st order lens. Located atop a rocky island about 2.5 miles (4 km) south southeast of Popham Beach. Accessible only by boat; moorings provided. Maine Maritime Museum in Bath offers cruises to the island in season and several area captains provide transportation to the island. Site open, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Friends of Seguin Island Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-746; Admiralty J0146; USCG 1-0035.
Seguin Island Light
Seguin Island Light, Georgetown, August 2008
Creative Commons photo by Sue Clark

Cumberland County Lighthouses

Casco Bay Lighthouses
Little Mark Island Monument
Date unknown (tower built 1827). Active; focal plane 74 ft (22.5 m); white flash every 4 s. Approx. 50 ft (15 m) unpainted square pyramidal granite monument with a modern light mounted at the top. A black vertical stripe is painted on each side of the tower, which is otherwise unpainted white granite. The tower has a room at the base, originally meant as a shelter for shipwrecked sailors and now used for storage batteries for the light. Lighthouse Explorer has Jeremy D'Entremont's photo, Earl Long has a 2010 photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Built as a daymark, this tower was not intended to be a lighthouse, and it is not known when it became a lighted aid to navigation. Located on Little Mark Island about 1 mile (1.5 km) southwest of the tip of Bailey Island and three miles (5 km) north of Halfway Rock. Accessible only by boat. Visible from the end of ME 24 in Bailey Island. Site open (but landing may be difficult), tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1178; Admiralty J0174; USCG 1-6700.
Halfway Rock
1871. Active; focal plane 77 ft (23.5 m); red flash every 5 s. 76 ft (23 m) wave-swept unpainted round granite tower with lantern and gallery; solar-powered VRB-25 aerobeacon (1994). Lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s) operates continuously. The original 3rd order Fresnel lens is on display at the U.S. Coast Guard Museum in New London, CT. The keeper's house and the rest of the light station were destroyed by various storms. Anderson also has a good page for the lighthouse, Lighthouse Digest has a February 2003 article on the history of the station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. In 2000, the light tower was leased by the American Lighthouse Foundation for preservation. Interior restoration is needed badly. The Foundation surrendered its lease, and in 2014 the lighthouse was placed on sale at auction.. Located on a bare, rocky island in the middle of Casco Bay about 12 miles (19 km) east of Portland. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: American Lighthouse Foundation. ARLHS USA-364; Admiralty J0176; USCG 1-0040.
Halfway Rock Light
Halfway Rock Light, Casco Bay, October 2007
Flickr photo copyright Jeremy D'Entremont; used by permission

Portland Area Lighthouses
* Portland Breakwater ("Bug Light") (2)
1875 (station established 1855). Reactivated (inactive 1942-2002, now privately maintained); focal plane 33 ft (10 m); white flash every 4 s. Unique design: 25 ft (7.5 m) round cast iron plate tower with lantern; the tower resembles the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates in Athens, Greece. Tower painted white, lantern black. The original 6th order Fresnel lens is on display at the South Portland Coast Guard Station. Mike Timberlake's photo is at right, Britten has a good photo, Anderson has a page with fine photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. A keeper's house was attached to the lighthouse in 1889 but demolished in 1934, when the light was concerted to city electric power. This is one of the many lighthouses known as "Bug Light." Volunteers from the South Portland/Cape Elizabeth Rotary Club and the Spring Point Ledge Lighthouse Trust organized to repaint and renovate the lighthouse in 2002, and it was relit in a ceremony on 14 August 2002. In 2003 a safety fence was built along the breakwater; some controversy arose since the fence is not historically accurate. Located in Bug Light Park (developed by the city in 1999) in South Portland; accessible by walking the short breakwater. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator/site manager: City of South Portland. ARLHS USA-659; Admiralty J0193.8; USCG 1-7699.
** Spring Point Ledge
1897. Active; focal plane 54 ft (16.5 m); white flash every 6 s (two red sectors warn mariners who have strayed from the channel). 54 ft (16.5 m) sparkplug-style round brick tower with lantern and three galleries, on a brick caisson, incorporating 2-story keeper's quarters; 300 mm lens. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). Tower painted white, lantern black. C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, Brent Danley has a 2007 photo, Anderson has a good page with several photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This is the only Maine sparkplug tower retaining its lower gallery and canopy. Offshore when it was built, the lighthouse has been connected to land by a breakwater since 1951. The lighthouse was transferred to the Spring Point Ledge Light Trust in 1998 under the Maine Lights program. Opened to the public for the first time in 1999, this was the first sparkplug lighthouse in the nation to open for tours. The interior has been restored and furnished with period furniture. Fund raising for structural restoration is in progress. In 2001, the city provided funds to restore the canopy and repair cracks in the caisson; the project was completed in 2004. In 2007, the Trust raised $71,000 to replace the lantern glass and repair exterior cracks in the tower. Located off Spring Point a few hundred yards east of the Portland Breakwater Light. Accessible in fair weather by walking the breakwater from the Portland Harbor Museum on Fort Road, South Portland. Site open, tower open to museum tours on Saturdays mid June through September and on Sundays in July and August. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Spring Point Ledge Light Trust. ARLHS USA-785; Admiralty J0195; USCG 1-7610.
Ram Island Ledge
1905. Active; focal plane 77 ft (23.5 m); 2 white flashes every 6 s. 72 ft (22 m) wave-swept unpainted round granite tower with lantern and gallery, incorporating 2-story keeper's quarters; 300 mm lens converted to solar power in January 2001. Lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Sibling of The Graves Light near Boston. Not to be confused with the Ram Island Light (see above). No information is available on the condition of this tower, and it may be endangered by its age and inadequate maintenance. The American Lighthouse Foundation has posted a report on an inspection visit in February 2006. In 2008 the lighthouse was listed for transfer under NHLPA. After preservation groups passed on applying for the light, it was sold at auction in September 2010 for $190,000. The buyer is Jeffrey Florman, a surgeon from nearby Windham. Dr. Florman has not announced his plans for restoration. Located on a bare ledge about one mile off Portland Head at the south entrance to Portland Harbor. Accessible only by boat, but there's a good view from Portland Head Light. Site and tower closed. Owner/operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: American Lighthouse Foundation. ARLHS USA-686; Admiralty J0204; USCG 1-7575.


Portland Breakwater (Bug) Light, South Portland, June 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Mike Timberlake

Spring Point Ledge Light
Spring Point Ledge Light, South Portland, October 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey


Cape Elizabeth Lighthouses
*** Portland Head
1791 (Benjamin Lincoln). Active; focal plane 101 ft (31 m); white flash every 4 s, day and night; in addition, a directional light, at base of tower, shows narrow green, white, and red sectors to guide approaching ships. 80 ft (24.5 m) round rubblestone tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached through a workroom to a 2-story wood keeper's house (1891); DCB-224 aerobeacon (1958). Lantern, watch room, and gallery painted black. Fog horn (blast every 15 s). The lower floor houses a museum; the 2nd order Fresnel lens (1885) and a 5th order Fresnel lens from Squirrel Point Light are on display. The brick fog signal building was reconstructed in 1975. Ted Kerwin's photo is at right, Anderson has an excellent page for the station, Lighthouse Digest has an article on the history of the light station, Wikimedia has Sumit Narayan's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a fine aerial view. Maine's oldest lighthouse and one of the nation's most historic, this light station stands on a dramatically beautiful headland south of Portland. Views of the lighthouse have appeared in countless movies and television commercials. This was the very first lighthouse built by the federal government after it assumed control of lighthouses in 1789; it was dedicated in 1791 by the Marquis de Lafayette, the French officer who aided the U.S. in the Revolutionary War. The lighthouse was originally only 60 ft (18 m) tall. Its upper portion had to be rebuilt in 1813. In poor condition by 1850, it was renovated in 1855 and a 4th order Fresnel lens was installed. A brick upper section and a 2nd order lens and lantern were added in 1864. However, the brickwork did not weather well and these improvements were removed in 1883. A new extension replaced them in 1885, and the elegant 2-story double keeper's house was completed in 1891. The Town of Cape Elizabeth leased the lighthouse in 1990 and took title to the property in 1993. A $260,000 restoration, completed in 2005, included painting, window replacement, and landscape improvements. In 2014 a $150,000 project made improvements to the park surrounding the lighthouse. Site open daily; museum open daily late May to mid-October, also on weekends beginning mid April and ending late December; tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: Town of Cape Elizabeth. Site manager: Portland Head Light. ARLHS USA-661; Admiralty J0206; USCG 1-7565.
Portland Head Light
Portland Head Light, Cape Elizabeth, August 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Ted Kerwin
Cape Elizabeth East (2)
1874 (station established 1828). Active; focal plane 129 ft (39.5 m); 4 white flashes every 15 s (flashes separated by 2.5 s), day and night. 67 ft (20 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a square 1-story base; VRB-25 aerobeacon. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 60 s). The original drum-style 2nd order Fresnel lens was on display at Cape Elizabeth Town Hall until August 2013, when the town surrendered its lease; the lens will now go to the Maine Maritime Museum in Bath. The 2-story Victorian keeper's house (1878), a private residence, was so drastically altered in 1999 that the Maritime Heritage Program lists the original building as "demolished." Brick fog signal building (1886). Anderson has a page with good photos, Lighthouse Digest has an article on keeper Marcus Hanna, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. The light station is adjacent to but not part of Two Lights State Park. This lighthouse appears in a famous painting (1929) by Edward Hopper. In 2000, the tower was leased by the American Lighthouse Foundation for preservation. In 2006, ALF announced plans for restoration of the concrete base of the lighthouse and of the oil house, and this project was completed in the fall of 2008. Located at the end of Two Lights Road off ME 77 in Cape Elizabeth. Site and tower closed (gated community), but good views are available from the adjoining state park. Tower owner/operator: U.S. Coast Guard, site manager: American Lighthouse Foundation. Other buildings private. ARLHS USA-113; Admiralty J0208; USCG 1-0060.
Cape Elizabeth West (2)
1874 (station established 1828). Inactive since 1924. 67 ft (20 m) round cast iron tower with gallery (twin of the east tower), painted white. The lantern was removed and replaced by a 12-sided observation room during World War II. The lighthouse was sold in 1959 and has been in private hands since. Anderson has a good photo, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. The light station is adjacent to but not part of Two Lights State Park. Located 300 yards (275 m) west of the east tower. Site and tower closed (gated community), but distant views are available from the adjoining Two Lights State Park. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-115.

York County Lighthouses

Biddeford and Kennebunkport Lighthouses
** Wood Island
1808. Active; focal plane 71 ft (21.5 m); flash every 5 s, alternating white and green. 47 ft (14 m) round rubblestone tower with lantern and gallery, painted white, attached to a 2-story wood keeper's house (1906); VRB-25 aerobeacon (1972). Lantern and gallery painted black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s). The lantern was removed in 1972 and rebuilt in 1986. Maine's second oldest lighthouse, and the nation's eleventh oldest. The bell tower was destroyed by a storm in the 1960s, but the 1872 bell was saved and is on display at Vine's Landing in Biddeford Pool. Stone oil house (1903). Converted to solar power in 2001. Anderson has an excellent page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. In March 2003 the Coast Guard leased the station to a chapter of the American Lighthouse Foundation. Volunteers cleared the site, removed debris from the tower, and restored electrical service to the lighthouse; a restoration plan has been prepared and submitted to the state for approval. In 2008, following the installation of a new handrail, the tower was opened to guided tours. The tower was refurbished in 2009, and in 2011 the exterior of the keeper's house was restored. Located on an island off the mouth of the Saco River northeast of Biddeford Pool. Maineharbors.com has a chart. Most of the island is a wildlife sanctuary administered by the Maine Audubon Society. Accessible only by boat; dock and a boardwalk to the lighthouse are provided. In 2004 the chapter began offering guided tours from Biddeford Pool on Wednesdays and Saturdays during the summer. The lighthouse is visible from the Biddeford Pool Trail, an Audubon Society trail on the mainland; the trail head is at the end of Main Street, Biddeford Pool. Site open, station and tower open to guided tours on Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday mornings during July and August (reservations required). Owner/operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Friends of Wood Island Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-905; Admiralty J0214; USCG 1-0095.
Goat Island (3)
1859 (station established 1834). Active; focal plane 38 ft (11.5 m); white flash every 6 s. 25 ft (7.5 m) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery; 300 mm lens. Fog horn (blast every 15 s). Tower painted white, lantern and gallary black. The original 1-1/2 story keeper's house is occupied in season by a caretaker. The fog bell is on display at the Kennebunkport Historical Society on North Street, Kennebunkport. Buildings painted white; roofs red. Brian Sawyer's photo is at right, Anderson's page has several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This was the last staffed light station in Maine, finally automated in 1990. The station was transferred to the Kennebunkport Conservation Trust in 1998 under the Maine Lights program. In 2008, the Coast Guard installed a new VLB-44 LED optic. In 2009 the Trust announced plans for a complete restoration of the station. This $1 million project was carried out in 2011; it included the rebuilding of the bell tower demolished in 1962, restoration of the keeper's house, and rebuilding the covered walkway destroyed by a 1978 storm. Located on an island in the mouth of Cape Porpoise Harbor southeast of Kennebunkport. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Kennebunkport Conservation Trust. ARLHS USA-325; Admiralty J0218; USCG 1-0105.
Goat Island Light
Goat Island Light, Kennebunkport, July 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Brian Sawyer

York and Kittery Lighthouses
* Cape Neddick ("Nubble Light")
1879. Active; focal plane 88 ft (27 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 41 ft (12.5 m) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, attached to the original 2-story wood keeper's house; 4th order Fresnel lens (1891, installed here in 1928). Tower painted white, lantern and gallary black. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). Red brick oil house (1902). Brian Sawyer's photo is at right, Dana Moos has a wintry 2010 photo, Anderson's page has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. A sibling of Little River Light (see Eastern Maine), this is one of Maine's best known and most visited lighthouses. The lighthouse is almost always called Nubble Light. (In Maine, a "nubble" is a small, rocky island, and the lighthouse is located on the islet called Cape Neddick Nubble.) The light station was transferred to the Town of York under the Maine Lights program in 1998. The town maintains a welcome center and gift shop at Sohier Town Park on the mainland opposite the lighthouse. Every year the light station is decorated gaily for Christmas; a photo shows this well. The lighting ceremony is on the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Friends of Nubble Light works for preservation of the light station. There are plans to renovate the keeper's house as a caretaker's house. In 2001 the foundation of the lighthouse was regrouted and painted, the walkway to the lighthouse was replaced, and a new boat ramp was built. In 2007, the walkway, boat landing and other outside facilities were heavily damaged by a nor'easter, and the town sought $1 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for repairs. The light was extinguished in March 2013 when the electrical line from the mainland failed; the town scrambled to find funds and restored service in July. The Coast Guard has proposed to replace the Fresnel lens with a solar-powered LED light, a move strongly opposed by the town. In the fall of 2013 the town began offering a raffle for chances to tour the light station. Located on an island off Cape Neddick at York Beach. Accessible only by boat, but the view from Sohier Town Park is excellent. Site open, visitor center open daily mid April through mid October, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: Town of York. ARLHS USA-130; Admiralty J0226; USCG 1-0125.
Cape Neddick Light
Cape Neddick (Nubble) Light, York, September 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Brian Sawyer
Boon Island (5)
1855 (station established 1799). Active; focal plane 137 ft (42 m); white flash every 5 s. 133 ft (41 m) round unpainted waveswept granite tower with lantern and gallery; solar-powered VRB-25 aerobeacon (1993). Lantern painted black. Fog horn (blast every 10 s). The original 2nd order Fresnel lens is on display at the Kittery Historical and Naval Museum in Kittery. The keeper's house and all other light station buildings have been destroyed by storms; storms also claimed earlier light towers in 1804 and 1831. Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Lighthouse Digest has a story on the history of the light station, also a second article, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Huelse has a historic postcard view, but the lighthouse is not seen in Google's fuzzy satellite view. This isolated tower is the tallest New England lighthouse. In 2000, the lighthouse was leased by the American Lighthouse Foundation for preservation. The local ALF chapter, calling itself the Republic of Boon Island, cheerfully declared its "independence." In 2012 the lighthouse was listed for transfer under NHLPA. ALF tried to organize an application for ownership, but the Town of York declined participation. In May 2014 the lighthouse was placed on sale in an online auction, and in August it sold for $78,000 to Art Girard, a Portland real estate developer. Located on a tiny islet about 9 miles (15 km) off the coast of York. Accessible only by boat; cruises from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, pass close to the island. Site and tower closed. Owner/operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS USA-071; Admiralty J0228; USCG 1-0155.
Whaleback Ledge (2)
1872 (station established 1831). Active; focal plane 59 ft (18 m); 2 white flashes every 10 s. 50 ft (15 m) round granite tower with lantern and gallery, incorporating 3-story keeper's quarters; rotating VRB-25 aerobeacon (2002). Tower unpainted, lantern and gallery panted black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s). Herbie Robinson's photo is at right, Anderson has a page with good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view from the end of Ocean Street in Portsmouth. In 2002 the Coast Guard removed the DCB-224 aerobeacon; the new beacon was converted to solar power in 2003. The town of Kittery has taken ownership of Wood Island, about 400 yards (365 m) north of the lighthouse, and plans to restore the former Coast Guard station there as a lighthouse museum. In November 2005, the American Lighthouse Foundation announced it was taking over maintenance of the lighthouse from the Coast Guard, and in February 2006 ALF conducted an inspection of the light. In 2007 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. The Friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouse, an ALF chapter, applied for ownership. A competing application by Beacon Preservation was withdrawn, and title to the lighthouse was granted to the ALF chapter in November 2008. In late 2009, the Coast Guard installed a modern VLB-44 LED optic in the tower. In September 2013, a $7000 project completed critically needed repairs to the lantern and gallery. Located on a rocky reef in the mouth of the Piscataqua River off Jaffrey Point, NH. Accessible only by boat; cruises from Portsmouth, NH, pass the tower. Site open, tower closed except for occasional guided tours. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: American Lighthouse Foundation. Site manager: Friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-963; Admiralty J0232; USCG 1-0200.

Inland (Kennebec County) Lighthouse

Ladies Delight
1908 (Frank Morse). Active in season; flashing white light. 16 ft (5 m) round stone tower, painted white, with wood lantern and gallery. Anderson's page has good photos, and Google has a satellite view. In 2000 the lighthouse was considered endangered, leaning and in need of restoration. Repairs in 2001 brought the tower back to vertical. (Although Lighthouse Explorer's photo by Hugh Stephens clearly shows the lean, Anderson's photos show the lighthouse restored and in good condition.) In 2005 a new aluminum lantern was installed. The lighthouse has its own web page. Located on a reef in Lake Cobbosseecontee about 1 mile (1.5 km) south of Island Park in Manchester and 10 miles (16 km) west of Augusta, the state capital. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Cobbosseecontee Yacht Club. ARLHS USA-1127.
Whaleback Ledge Light
Whaleback Ledge Light, Kittery, January 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Herbie Robinson

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Eastern Maine | South: New Hampshire

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Posted May 16, 2001. Checked and revised March 5, 2014. Lighthouses: 38. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.