Lighthouses of the United States: Michigan's Eastern Upper Peninsula

The U.S. state of Michigan comes in two parts: the Lower Peninsula (between Lakes Huron and Michigan) and the Upper Peninsula (between Lakes Michigan and Superior). Putting the two together, the state has an astonishingly long coastline, so it is not surprising that Michigan has more lighthouses than any other U.S. state, by quite a large margin. The Directory has information on more than 170 Michigan lights. 

This page includes lighthouses of the north shores of Lakes Huron and Michigan, the St. Mary's River waterway, and Lake Superior from Sault Sainte Marie through Alger County (the Munising area). There's a separate page for Western Upper Peninsula lighthouses.

The state's lighthouse heritage is well recognized. Michigan is the only state that supports lighthouse preservation with a program of annual grants from the state to local preservation groups. All over the state, volunteers are working hard to save and restore lighthouses. There is a state preservation society, the Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy, and the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association is also based in the state.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. USCG numbers are from Volume VII of the United States Coast Guard Light List.


Crisp Point Light, Luce County, July 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo by James Marvin Phelps

General Sources
Seeing the Lights: The Lighthouses of Michigan
A wonderful site by Terry Pepper, with fine photos, accounts of recent visits to many of the lighthouses, and extensive historical information.
Michigan Lighthouses
Excellent photos and information posted by Kraig Anderson.
Lighthouses of the Great Lakes
Maintained by Neil Schultheiss, this very fine site has excellent photos and accounts for most of the state's lighthouses.
Lighthouses in Michigan, United States
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lake Michigan Lighthouses and Lake Superior Lighthouses
Photos by C.W. Bash.
Lighthouses of the Great Lakes
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Coast Guard Lighthouses - Michigan
Historic photos and notes, posted by the U.S. Coast Guard Historian's office.
Leuchttürme USA auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.
National Maritime Inventory - Michigan
Inventory of Michigan lighthouse data.
Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association
GLLKA encourages lighthouse preservation throughout the Great Lakes states, but it is best known for its work preserving the Round Island and St. Helena Island Lights in the Straits of Mackinac area. The association has an excellent blog.
Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy
This organization is dedicated to the preservation of lighthouses and life saving stations throughout the state.
Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival
Based in Alpena, the festival is held annually in mid October and supports preservation efforts, especially for lighthouses of northwest Lake Huron and the Mackinac Straits area.
Michigan Lighthouse Fund
A non-profit organization, the fund channels state grants and private donations to support Michigan lighthouses.
Upper Peninsula Lighthouses on Lake Superior Open to the Public
Complete and well-illustrated accounts for 6 Upper Peninsula lights.
Lighthouses of the Straits of Mackinac
Fine photos posted by Keith Stokes.
Point Iroquois Light
Point Iroquois Light, Brimley, October 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash

Alger County Lighthouses

Munising Area Lighthouses
* Christmas (Grand Island Harbor Range Rear)
1914 (station established 1868). Active; focal plane 72 ft (22 m); continuous white light. 62 ft (19 m) round steel tower with lantern and gallery. The lower half of the tower is painted black and the upper half is painted white; lantern and gallery are black. Guy wires steady the tower. The upper half of this lighthouse was relocated from Vidal Shoals on the upper St. Mary's River. The light serves general purposes, but also functions as a range with the Bay Furnace Light (next entry), a cylindrical tower just to the north. During the Christmas season, the lighthouse is floodlit and holiday lights adorn the guy wires. Bash's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the east side of the village of Christmas, about 50 yd (45 m) off MI 28 on the land side opposite the Bay Furnace Light, about 5 miles (8 km) west of Munising. It's best to park on the highway, visitors say. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. Forest Service. Site manager: Hiawatha National Forest. ARLHS USA-1080; USCG 7-14597.
[Bay Furnace (3) (Grand Island Harbor Range Front)]
1968 (station established 1868). Active; focal plane 20 ft (6 m), white flash every 2.5 s. 20 ft (6 m) "D9" white round cylindrical steel tower. Pepper has a small photo and the history of the station, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The foundation of a 1914 post light is also visible on the beach. Located on the east side of the village of Christmas, where it is visible from MI 28 on the lake side, about 5 miles (8 km) west of Munising. Located on the lakeshore just north of the Christmas Light. Accessible by hiking trail. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Hiawatha National Forest. ARLHS USA-1079; USCG 7-14600.

Christmas Light, Munising, July 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Grand Island North (Old North) (2)
1867 (station established 1856). Inactive since 1961. 40 ft (12 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery attached church-style to 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Tower painted white, lantern black; the house is currently painted a pale yellow. The modern light (1961; focal plane 190 ft (58 m), white flash every 6 s) is mounted on a 25 ft (7.5 m) white post in front of the lighthouse. Anderson has a good page with several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is at the top of a spectacular 165 ft (50 m) vertical cliff. The lighthouse is a private summer residence, renovated and modernized by its current owners, Pat and Loren Graham. Located at the northern tip of Grand Island north of Munising. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-329; USCG 7-14570.
Grand Island East Channel
1870. Inactive since 1913. 15 m (49 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery attached church-style to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's quarters. A photo is at right, Michael Koole has a 2008 photo, Anderson's page has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Lighthouse Digest featured the lighthouse in its January 2000 issue, and Google has a satellite view. Critically endangered by past neglect and beach erosion. The owner and local volunteers have done some stabilization work in an effort to save the lighthouse, and the American Lighthouse Foundation launched a fundraising campaign. In 2000, volunteers built 75% of a seawall to protect the lighthouse. In 2001 the seawall was completed and work was scheduled to begin on the building. The Alger Historical Society is coordinating preservation efforts. We need current information on the progress of the project, but a September 2006 photo shows that the seawall is intact, the foundation appears sound, and the wood has been restored. Located on the southeast coast of Grand Island at the entrance to Grand Island Harbor Bay. Visible from boat tours of the Pictured Rocks lakeshore. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-328.
* Munising Range Front
1908. Active; focal plane 79 ft (24 m); continuous red light. 58 ft (17.5 m) round steel tower with lantern and gallery; red acrylic lens. Entire lighthouse painted white. The 1-1/2 story brick and wood keeper's house (identical to the one at Grand Marais) is used for offices by the park service. Brick oil house with tin roof. Anderson's page has photos, Bash has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. In 2002 the Coast Guard transferred ownership of the range lights to the National Park Service. In 2008-09 the two towers were sandblasted, repaired, and repainted. The keeper's house has been renovated for offices for Park Service science and natural resources staff. Located on MI 28 at Hemlock Street in Munising. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. National Park Service. Site manager: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. ARLHS USA-948; USCG 7-14575.
Grand Island East Channel Light
Grand Island East Channel Light, Grand Island, September 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Angelskiss31
* Munising Range Rear
1908. Active; focal plane 107 ft (32.5 m); continuous red light. 33 ft (10 m) round steel tower; red acrylic lens. Entire lighthouse painted white. Brian Burch has a good photo, Bash has another good photo, and Anderson also has a photo, but trees partially conceal the lighthouse in Google's satellite view. Located on a hillside at the south end of Hemlock Street in Munising. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. National Park Service. Site manager: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. ARLHS USA-949; USCG 7-14580.

Grand Marais Area Lighthouses
*** Au Sable
1874 (O.M. Poe). Active; focal plane 100 ft (30.5 m); white flash every 6 s. 87 ft (26.5 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery attached to 2-story brick, hipped-roof keeper's house; 300 mm lens mounted outside the lantern. The original 3rd order Fresnel lens was returned to the tower in 1996 after 39 years on display at the Grand Marais Maritime Museum. Lighthouse painted white with black trim; lantern and gallery painted black. A complete and beautifully restored light station, including a brick fog signal building (1897), assistant keeper's house (1909), steel oil house (1915), and other structures. Since 1988, the National Park Service has been restoring the light station to its appearance in 1910. The keeper's house has been renovated to house a visitor center on the lower floor and an apartment for volunteer caretakers on the upper floor. A photo appears at right, Anderson has an excellent page for the lighthouse, Kelly Krupka has a good photo, the Park Service has a web page for the light station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on Big Sable Point, a prominent cape off County Road 58 about 12 miles (20 km) west of Grand Marais. Accessible by a hike of 1.5 miles (2.5 km) from the east end of the lower Hurricane River Campground. Site open, guided tours of the station and tower Wednesday through Sunday from July 1 through late August. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. ARLHS USA-022; USCG 7-14565.
*** Grand Marais Harbor of Refuge Outer
1895. Active; focal plane 40 ft (12 m); white flash every 2.5 s. 34 ft (10 m) square pyamidal skeletal tower with gallery and an enclosed workroom below the light; lantern removed. Entire lighthouse painted white. D. Malewski has a closeup photo, Anderson has a good page for the two range lights, and Bing has a satellite view. The two Grand Marais lights were designed to function as a range, but they are no longer used in that way. The harbor is sheltered by a sand spit stabilized by a terminal groin. Located at the north end of the groin. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1080; USCG 7-14550.
*** Grand Marais Harbor of Refuge Inner
1898. Active; focal plane 54 ft (16.5 m); continuous white light. 47 ft (14 m) square pyamidal skeletal tower with lantern, gallery, and an enclosed workroom below the lantern. Original 5th order Fresnel lens in use. Entire lighthouse painted white. The 2-story brick keeper's house (1908) is now the Lightkeepers House Museum. A good closeup is available, Lighthouse Heritage has photos of both towers, and Bing has a street view and a satellite view. Google also has a street view of the keeper's house. The inner light is located at the south end of the groin, near the keeper's house. Site open; museum open daily (free) in July and August, weekends in June and September; towers closed. Owner: (tower) U.S. Coast Guard, (keeper's house) U.S. National Park Service (Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore). Site manager: Grand Marais Historical Society. ARLHS USA-1079; USCG 7-14560.
Au Sable Light
Au Sable Light, Pictured Rocks Lakeshore, August 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Nakor

Luce County Lighthouse

** Crisp Point
1904. Reactivated (inactive 1947-2013, now privately maintained); focal plane about 75 ft (23 m); white flash every 6 s. 58 ft (17.5 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 1-story brick service building. Lighthouse painted white; lantern and gallery painted black, lantern roof red. The keeper's house and other buildings have all been demolished or washed away by the lake. James Phelps's photo appears at the top of this page, Pepper's page has photos and a historical account, Anderson's page has two good photos, a 2010 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo showing the keeper's house, and Bing has a satellite view. The tower is critically endangered by beach erosion, as seen in a 2004 photo. Riprap placed around the tower base is providing at least temporary protection, but storm waves threatened the station as recently as November 2005. An August 2006 photo showed much improved conditions. Volunteers are working to save the tower and provide parking and facilities. There is also a plan to relight the lighthouse. In late 2006, construction began to replace the brick service building lost to erosion in 1996; the building was completed in 2007. In 2009 a replica of the original fog signal building was built as a visitor center for the station, and a 4th order Fresnel lens has been loaned to the society for display. In November 2012, a new ML-300 lens was installed, and the lighthouse was reactivated in May 2013. In August 2013, a new 3810 acre (1542 hectare) nature preserve was established to protect the site. Located at the end of county road 412, which was extended to the lighthouse in 1999; to find this road turn off MI 123 onto county road 500 halfway between Paradise and Newberry (these are unpaved roads: 4WD recommended). Site open, tower open weekends in season. Owner/site manager: Crisp Point Light Historical Society. ARLHS USA-203; USCG 7-14535.

Chippewa County Lighthouses

Southeast Lake Superior Lighthouses
**** Whitefish Point (2)
1861 (station established 1847). Active; focal plane 80 ft (24.5 m); 2 white flashes every 20 s, flashes separated by 5 s. 76 ft (23 m) square pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern, double gallery, and central cylinder attached to a 2-story wood keeper's house; twin DCB-224 aerobeacons (1968). Lighthouse painted white, galleries and lantern black; lantern roof is red. Brick fog signal building (1937) and oil house (1910). The 2-story crew quarters building (1923) is open for overnight stays. A photo is at right, Heidi Blanton has a good photo, Lighthouse Digest has published a history of the light station as well as a feature article, Pepper's page has excellent photos and historical information, Anderson also has a fine page for the light station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the station, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. This tower is one of the oldest onshore skeletal lighthouses in the U.S. An unusually well-preserved light station. The Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society (GLSHS), formed in 1978, has restored the station and operated it as a maritime museum since 1985. The bivalve 2nd order Fresnel lens from White Shoal Light in upper Lake Michigan is on display. Located on a very prominent cape at the end of Whitefish Point Road north of Paradise. Site open, museum open daily in season, weekends in late fall and early spring. Owner/site manager: Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum. ARLHS USA-887; USCG 7-14530.
**** Point Iroquois (2)
1871 (station established 1855). Inactive since 1971. 65 ft (20 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 2-story brick keeper's house (1902). Lighthouse painted white; lantern and gallery black. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. The original keeper's house (1870), used as assistant keeper's quarters after 1902, is also preserved. Volunteer caretakers live on site year round. Bash's photo is at the top of this page, Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, Bradley Buhro has a good photo of the station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The light station is a museum, restored through efforts of the Bay Mills/Brimley Historical Research Society. The 4th order Fresnel lens from Martin Reef Light (see below) is on display. The light was replaced by several buoys offshore. Located on Lakeshore Drive about 7.5 miles (12 km) northwest of Brimley at the entrance to the St. Mary's River from Lake Superior. Site open, museum open daily mid May through mid October. Owner: U.S. Forest Service. Site manager: Hiawatha National Forest. ARLHS USA-624.
Whitefish Point Light
Whitefish Point Light, Paradise, June 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by hatchski

Upper St. Marys River (Sault Sainte Marie Area) Lighthouses
Note: The St. Marys River is the outlet for Lake Superior. It is about 75 mi (125 km) long, draining southeastward into the northern end of Lake Huron. For much of its course it is braided, with numerous islands, some in the United States and some in Canada. The Soo Locks at Sault Ste. Marie, first opened in 1855, bypass the rapids of the river and open Lake Superior to navigation by large vessels.
Round Island Northwest (Light 26)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 34 ft (10.5 m); quick-flashing red light. 34 ft (10.5 m) round tower with gallery; the light is shown from a fiberglass post atop the gallery. Lighthouse painted white with one narrow red horizontal band. C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a shoal in the entrance to the St. Marys River, about 1.25 mi (2 km) north of Birch Point and 0.8 mi (1.3 km) northwest of Round Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14425.
* Birch Point Range Front (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 51 ft (15.5 m); continuous red light. 53 ft (16 m) square cylindrical skeletal tower carrying a large rectangular daymark colored red with a white vertical stripe. Bing has a satellite view. The range guides vessels entering the river from Lake Superior. Located on the actual Birch Point at the end of Birch Point Road, about 1 mi (1.6 km) to the west of the historic light station and about 2 miles (3 km) northeast of Brimley. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14430.
Birch Point Range Rear (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 101 ft (31 m) continuous red light visible only on the range line. 75 ft (23 m) square skeletal tower with gallery, carrying a large rectangular daymark colored red with a white vertical stripe. Bing has an indistinct satellite view. Located in dense forest 3000 ft (915 m) southeast of the front light. Site status unknown. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14435.
[St. Mary's River Upper Range Front (Round Island) (2)]
1864 (station established 1855). Inactive since 1886. Part of the foundation of this former lighthouse is still standing. Bing has a satellite view. This was a westbound range for vessels leaving the Soo Locks. Located on Round Island, a small island off Round Island Point. Soo Locks Boat Tours has a lighthouse cruise for which this is one of the sights listed. Site status and site manager unknown. ARLHS USA-803.
Round Island Northwest Light
Round Island Northwest Light, August 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey
[St. Mary's River Upper Range Rear (Birch Point)]
1864 (station established 1855). Inactive since 1886. The lighthouse, a 30 ft (9 m) square pyramidal wood tower, has been demolished. The 2-story wood Victorian keeper's house survives and is in use as a private residence. No photo available. Soo Locks Boat Tours has a lighthouse cruise for which this is one of the sights listed. Site closed; the house can only be seen from the water. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-804.
Brush Point Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 66 ft (20 m); continuous red light. 57 ft (18 m) square skeletal tower with gallery. No photo available, but Bing has a satellite view. This is an eastbound range; the front light is on a short skeletal tower on an island in the river. Located on the river bank about 1/2 mi (800 m) south of Brush Point. Site status unknown. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14395.
* Frying Pan Island (relocated to Sault Ste. Marie)
1882. Inactive. 18 ft (5.5 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery. Bash's photo is at right, a 2012 photo is available, Anderson's page for the lighthouse has a good photo, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This lighthouse was built at Frying Pan Island in the De Tour Passage just southeast of De Tour Village. After being replaced by a post light, it was relocated to stand at the entrance to the Coast Guard office in Sault Ste. Marie. Located in front of the station's main office at 337 Water Street near the eastern entrance to the Soo Locks in downtown Sault Ste. Marie. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Sault Ste. Marie Coast Guard Station. ARLHS USA-312.
* Bayfield Rock Range Rear (Little Rapids Cut Range Rear) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1895). Active; focal plane 54 ft (16.5 m); continuous white light. 40 ft (12 m) square steel skeletal tower with a square equipment shed on the gallery. Equipment building painted white. The 2-story wood keeper's house survives from the former light station, which is built at a sharp bend of the St. Mary's River. A photo of the light tower is available, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the station, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The original Little Rapids Cut Range guided upstream traffic, but the modern Bayfield Rock Range guides ships downstream below the Soo Locks. John Kulba has contributed photos showing renovations to the building in progress during the summer of 2002. Apparently the building is now used for offices of the Corps of Engineers. Located at the end of East Portage Avenue in Sault Sainte Marie, adjacent to the Sugar Island Ferry terminal. Site and tower closed, but parking is available nearby. Owner/site manager: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Soo Locks. ARLHS USA-441; USCG 7-14165.

Frying Pan Island Light (relocated to Sault Sainte Marie), October 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Frechette Point (Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 90 ft (27 m); continuous green light. 87 ft (26 m) square steel skeletal tower. A distant view is available, and Bing has a satellite view. This westbound range has assumed the function of the former Little Cut Range. Located on the southern point of an island across from Riverside Drive just north of East Three Mile Road. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14020.
Upper Nicolet Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 82 ft (25 m); continuous white light. Approx. 70 ft (21 m) square steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. This westbound range guides vessels leaving Lake Nicolet. Located in a densely forested area of northwestern Sugar Island. Site status unknown. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-13960.
* Six Mile Point Range Rear (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 65 ft (20 m); white light; 3 s on, 3 s off. 65 ft (20 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. This is an eastbound range for vessels after they make the turn at the Bayfield Rock Rear Light. (In this section, the waterway is entirely in the U.S., between the mainland and Sugar Island.) The original lighthouse was saved and is on display at the Les Cheneaux Historical Maritime Museum in Cedarville (see below). Located just off the mainland shore of the waterway at the end of East Five Mile Road. Accessible only by boat, but there are closeup views from shore. Site open, tower closed. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14050.
* Sugar Island (Leading Light)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 50 ft (15 m); white light; 3 s on, 3 s off. 49 ft (15 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Bing has a satellite view. The light guides eastbound vessels. Located on the west side of Sugar Island at the end of Leading Light Lane, about 1.5 mi (2.5 km) north of the head of Lake Nicolet. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-14040.

Lower St. Mary's River Lighthouses
West Neebish Upper Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 80 ft (24 m); continuous white light. 80 ft (24 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. The range guides eastbound vessels on the approach to Neebish Island. Located at the water's edge at the northwestern tip of Neebish Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-13475.
Lower Nicolet West Range Front (Middle Neebish) (1)
1907 (relocated from Windmill Point, Detroit, in 1931). Inactive since 1993. 55 ft (17 m) slender round cylindrical steel tower, painted red. Dan Weemhoff's photo is at right, Schultheiss also has a photo of this unusual and little-known light, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the north end of Neebish Island. Accessible by a hike of about 1 mile (1.6 km) from the end of Brander Road; Neebish Island is accessible by ferry from Barbeau. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1092.
Lower Nicolet West Range Front (Middle Neebish) (2)
1993. Active; focal plane 53 ft (16 m); continuous white light. Approx. 45 ft (14 m) square skeletal tower. The tower carries a large rectangular daymark painted red with a white stripe. Dan Weemhoff's photo is at right. Located next to the historic lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-13365.
Lower Nicolet West Range Rear (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 100 ft (31 m); continuous white light. Approx. 60 ft (18 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located 1250 yd (1145 m) south southeast of the front light, to which it is connected by a powerline easement. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1092; USCG 7-13370.
Oak Ridge Range Front
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 70 ft (21 m); continuous green light. 70 ft (21 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view and a very distant street view. This is an eastbound range guiding vessels on a long north-to-south reach on the west side of Neebish Island. Located just offshore a short distance upsteam from the Neebish Island Ferry terminal. Accessible only by boat, but there are good views from the ferry. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-13515.
Oak Ridge Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 70 ft (21 m); continuous green light. 70 ft (21 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located in a forest 650 yd (595 m) south of the front light. Site status unknown. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-13520.
Winter Point Range Rear (2)
Date unknown (station established 1892). Active; focal plane 82 ft (25 m); continuous white light. 60 ft (18 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Winter Point is the southern tip of Neebish Island; the modern front light there is on a short skeletal tower. The range guides westbound vessels leaving Lake Munuscong. Located in a forest 4000 ft (1220 m) northwest of the front light; a cleared sightline connects the lights. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-13025.
Middle Neebish Light
Middle Neebish Lights, Neebish Island, November 2007
Flickr photo copyright Dan Weemhoff; used by permission
Round Island (St. Mary's River)
1892. Inactive since 1929. Approx. 50 ft (15 m) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. The active light is a post light: focal plane 28 ft (8.5 m); white flash every 2.5 s. Private summer residence. Anderson has a good page for the light station with several photos, Bash has a 2009 photo, a 2007 photo and a 2011 photo are available, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the station, and Bing has a satellite view. Not to be confused with the Round Island Light in the Straits of Mackinac (see below) or yet another Round Island at the western end of the river (see above), this Round Island is between Lime Island and Point aux Frenes, northeast of Goetzville. In 2000 the building was renovated and expanded by the owners, Paul and Georgeann Lindberg; it looks great now, but it has been altered somewhat from its historic appearance. The lighthouse was placed on sale in the fall of 2013. Located at the west end of the island, in the northern end of Lake Munuscong. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-709; USCG 7-12940.
Pipe Island
1888. Active; focal plane 52 ft (16 m); white flash every 10 s. 44 ft (13.5 m) tower, consisting of a 25 ft (7.5 m) octagonal brick tower topped by a steel skeletal tower carrying a large red and white daymark. Brick tower painted white, skeletal tower black. This lighthouse was built privately by the Lake Carriers Association but was later taken over by the lighthouse service. The original lantern was replaced by the skeletal tower in 1941. Schultheiss has a page with several photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the lighthouse in its original form, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The island is privately owned, and except for the buildings it is protected by a conservation easement held by the Little Traverse Conservancy. In 2002, the island was sold to Mary and John Kostecki, who operated it as a vacation resort with three cottages for rental. The Kosteckis began work restoring the lighthouse, and they hoped eventually to rebuild the lantern. However, in 2006 the island was listed for sale and apparently sold; the new owners are not known. Located on the southwest side of Pipe Island, northeast of DeTour Village and at the southern end of Lake Munuscong. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower open to paying guests. Owner (tower): U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS USA-602; USCG 7-12875.
* [Six Mile Point Range Front (1) (relocated)]
Date unknown (around 1930?). Inactive. 20 ft (6 m) tapered round cast iron tower, painted white. C.M. Hanchey has a 2011 photo, a 2012 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This tower was built on the St. Mary's River south of Mission Point, a few miles southeast of Sault Sainte Marie. Located on private property beside Huron Street just north of the Drummond Island Ferry terminal in DeTour Village. Site open, tower closed.

Lake Huron Lighthouses
** DeTour Reef
1931. Active; focal plane 74 ft (22.5 m); white flash every 10 s (red sector covers shoals). 63 ft (19 m) square cylindrical reinforced concrete tower with lantern and gallery rising from 2-story reinforced concrete keeper's quarters; VRB-25 aerobeacon (1996). Lighthouse painted white, lantern black with a red roof. Fog horn (2 blasts every 60 s) as needed. The 3-1/2 order Fresnel lens (1936), removed in 1988, is now on display at the DeTour Passage Historical Museum. The original diaphone fog signal, discovered in storage in 1998, is on exhibit at the Drummond Island Historical Museum. Kevin Leonard's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The De Tour Reef Light Preservation Society is working for the preservation of the lighthouse. Lighthouse Digest has a 1999 article profiling the beginnings of this effort. In 2003-04 the exterior of the lighthouse was restored in a project funded by $960,000 in federal and state grants. In 2005 the lighthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places, and ownership was transferred to the preservation group under NHLPA. In 2013, the state granted $60,000 to repair the roof and clean up water damage caused by leaks. During the summer, volunteer keepers spend three-day stays at the lighthouse. Located on a reef in Lake Huron off the entrance to the St. Mary's River south of DeTour Village. Accessible only by boat. Site open; guided tours of the lighthouse are available on Saturdays mid June thorugh the end of August (reservations are essential). This is one of only a handful of offshore lighthouses worldwide that are regularly open for tours. Owner/site manager: De Tour Reef Light Preservation Society. ARLHS USA-226; USCG 7-12770.
Martin Reef
1927. Active; focal plane 65 ft (20 m); flash every 10 s, alternating red and white. 52 ft (16 m) square cylindrical reinforced concrete tower with lantern and gallery, incorporating 3-story keeper's quarters; solar-powered 200 mm lens. Lighthouse painted white, lantern roof red. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at Point Iroquois Light (see below). Michael Thiel has a nice photo, Anderson has a good page with excellent photos, and the Coast Guard has a historic photo. In 2013 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. Located on a reef in Lake Huron about 7 miles (11 km) southeast of Port Dolomite. Accessible only by boat; shallow water makes navigation hazardous in the area. Can be seen very distantly from MI 134, 6.5 miles (10.5 km) east of Port Dolomite. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-480; USCG 7-12205.

DeTour Reef Light
DeTour Reef Light, DeTour Village, July 2004
Flickr photo copyright Kevin Philo Leonard,
Light Keeper Photography; used by permission

Mackinac County Lighthouses

North Channel (Straits of Mackinac) Lighthouses
Note: The Straits of Mackinac (pronounced "mackinaw") connect Lake Huron on the east and Lake Michigan on the west, separating Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas. Bois Blanc Island, 12 mi (19 km) long and 6 mi (10 km) wide, divides the eastern part of the strait into the North Channel and South Channel. The Mackinac Bridge, completed in 1957, carries the I-75 freeway across the narrowest passage of the strait near St. Ignace.
* Six Mile Point Range Rear (1)
Date unknown (around 1930?). Inactive. Tapered round cylindrical cast iron (?) tower, painted white. A 2012 photo is available, C.M. Hanchey has a 2011 photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This tower was built on the St. Mary's River south of Mission Point, a few miles southeast of Sault Sainte Marie. According to Terry Pepper, range lights of this design were installed along the river around 1930. The light has been relocated to the grounds of the Les Cheneaux Historical Museum in Cedarville. Located on MI 134 at Lake Street, a short distance east of MI 129 in Cedarville. Site open year round, museum open daily during the summer, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Les Cheneaux Historical Museum. ARLHS USA-1091.
Bois Blanc Island (1)
1867 (station established 1829). Inactive since 1924. 38 ft (11.5 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached church-style to a 2-story brick keeper's house. Lighthouse is unpainted brick with yellow trim, lantern painted white. The active light (focal plane 32 ft (10 m); white flash every 2.5 s) is on a 17 ft (5 m) white cylindrical "D9" tower nearby. Second oldest light station in Michigan. The lighthouse is a private summer residence, well cared for by its owners. Anderson's page has photos, a nice 2004 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The Coast Guard's historic aerial photo also shows the second light, a skeletal tower. Located at the end of a long peninsula on the north side of Bois Blanc (pronounced "bob-lo") Island. The island is accessible May through November by ferry from Cheboygan on the Lower Peninsula, but the best way to see the lighthouse is on lighthouse cruises from Mackinaw City. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-068; USCG 7-12535.
Old Round Island Point (Round Island)
1894 (Frank Rounds). Reactivated (inactive 1947-1996, now privately maintained); focal plane 53 ft (16 m); white flash every 10 s. 53 ft (16 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-1/2 story brick keeper's house; 300 mm lens. Light tower unpainted, lantern painted black, keeper's house painted red below and white above. This light is a sibling of the Two Harbors MN light. Restored through efforts of the Friends of Round Island Lighthouse and the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association. Anderson's page also has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a narrow sand spit at the northwestern tip of Round Island, opposite Mackinac Island and just east of the Straits of Mackinac. Accessible only by boat. Visible from the Mackinac Island ferries; lighthouse cruises are also available. Site open, tower closed. Owner: U.S. Forest Service. Site manager: Hiawatha National Forest. ARLHS USA-706; USCG 7-12585.
Round Island Passage
1948. Active; focal plane 71 ft (21.5 m); red flash every 4 s. 60 ft (18 m) hexagonal concrete and steel tower; 190 mm lens. Lighthouse painted white with a single red band at the base. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. Jim Frazier has a good photo, Schultheiss has a page with a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has a satellite view. In 2013 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. Located off the end of the breakwater on the south side of Mackinac Island. Accessible only by boat. Visible from the Mackinac Island ferries; lighthouse cruises also available. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-710; USCG 7-12580.
* Wawatam (St. Ignace)
2006. Active (maintained by City of St. Ignace); focal plane 62 ft (19 m); white flash every 5 s. 16 m (52 ft) octagonal tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern roof is red. Steve Burt's photo is at right, another good photo is available, and Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This lighthouse was originally built by the Michigan highway department at the Monroe Welcome Center, on I-75 in the southeastern corner of the state, near the Ohio state line. When the welcome center was renovated in 2004, the highway department donated the structure to the City of St. Ignace. The lighthouse was installed at the end of the former railroad ferry pier, where for many years the ferry Chief Wawatam loaded and unloaded railroad cars crossing the Strait of Mackinac. After a wait for Coast Guard approval, the lighthouse was inaugurated as a privately maintained aid to navigation on August 20, 2006. Accessible by walking the pier. Owner/site manager: City of St. Ignace. USCG 7-12608.
Wawatum Light
Wawatam Light, St. Ignace, August 2009
Flickr photo Creative Commons by Steve Burt

Northshore Lake Michigan Lighthouses

St. Helena Island
1873. Active; focal plane 71 ft (21.5 m); white flash every 6 s. 71 ft (21.5 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery attached to a 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house; 250 mm lens. Tower painted white, gallery black, lantern red. Sibling of Point Iroquois Light. Bash's photo is at right, Schultheiss has a page with several photos, Anderson also has a page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse has been restored through efforts of the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association and local volunteers. In 2000, GLLKA leased property at Poupard Bay on US 2 opposite the island as a site for a dock to provide regular access to the light station. In 2001, the Little Traverse Conservancy bought the 266-acre (108 ha) island from its private owners as a nature and lighthouse preserve. In June 2002, Terry Pepper reported, "Restoration of the keeper's dwelling is now nearly complete. The privy and oil house have been restored, the assistant keeper's dwelling has been rebuilt by the Boy Scouts, and work is well underway on the restoration of the boathouse." Located at the southeastern end of an island at the western end of the Straits of Mackinac, about 2 miles (3 km) from the shore of the Upper Peninsula. Accessible only by boat. Site open, buildings open to GLLKA guided tours. Owner/site manager: Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association. ARLHS USA-794; USCG 7-17720.
[Naubinway Island (2)]
Date uncertain (station established 1931). Active; focal plane 32 ft (10 m); white flash every 4 s. 9 m (30 ft) white round cylindrical "D9" tower without lantern. This tower is similar to many of the modern pierhead lights on Lake Michigan. Bing has a satellite view. Located on a small island about a mile off Millecoquins Point in Naubinway. Visible from the Point and from beaches throughout the Naubinway area. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1083; USCG 7-21580.
Lansing Shoal
1928. Active; focal plane 69 ft (21 m); white flash every 10 s. 59 ft (18 m) square cylindrical steel and concrete tower with lantern, centered on a square concrete keeper's house, mounted on a concrete and stone crib; solar-powered 190 mm lens (1985). The tower is unpainted concrete; lantern is gray. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. The original 3rd order Fresnel lens has been on display at the Michigan Historical Museum in Lansing since 1985. Anderson has a page for the lighthouse with several photos, Schultheiss has a closeup by Violet Bostwick, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and the Coast Guard has a historic photo, but the light is only a blur in Bing's satellite view. The crib was slightly damaged by collision with a freighter in 1995. Located in northern Lake Michigan between the Beaver Islands and Naubinway. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-428; USCG 7-21535.
St. Helena Island Light
St. Helena Island Light, St. Ignace, 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash

Schoolcraft County (Manistique Area) Lighthouses

**** Seul Choix Point
1892. Active; focal plane 80 ft (24.5 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 78 ft (24 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery attached to a 2-story brick keeper's house; rotating DCB-24 aerobeacon (1972). Tower painted white with black trim and gallery; lantern roof is red. Original brick fog signal building, assistant keeper's house, two oil houses and other buildings: a complete light station. Heidi Raatz's photo is at right, Bash has a good photo, Anderson's page also has fine photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the station, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse was the last designed by O.M. Poe; it was built 20 years later than his other towers such as Au Sable Light (see above). The light station is a museum, fully restored and operated by the Gulliver Historical Society. Original fog horns are on display. The assistant keeper's house (built as a barn in 1892 and converted to a residence in 1907) was moved about 0.3 mi (500 m) away as a private home in the 1960s; donated to the historical society in 2006, it was moved back to its original location in November 2013. Note: the name is pronounced "Sis-shwa." Located on a prominent cape at the end of county road 431 about 8 miles (13 km) southeast of Gulliver. Site and tower open daily in the summer. Owner: Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Site manager: Seul Choix Point Lighthouse Park and Museums. ARLHS USA-749; USCG 7-21490.
* Manistique (East Breakwater)
1915. Active; focal plane 50 ft (15 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 35 ft (11 m) square pyramidal cast iron tower with lantern and gallery; 300 mm lens. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc. Tower painted bright red, lantern and gallery black. The 2-1/2 story keeper's house is in use as a private residence. Anderson's page for the lighthouse also has good photos, Rein Nomm has a closeup, Dan Baldini has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view and a very distant street view. In 2012 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. In June, City Council agreed to partner with the Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy to acquire the light. Engineers estimated in October that the lighthouse needs $155,000 for restoration. Apparently this price tag was too high for the city, and in June 2013 the lighthouse was sold at auction for $15,000 to Bill Collins, an Ohio lighthouse fan who alos owns the Liston Range Rear Light in Delaware. Collins immediately had the lighthouse repainted, and he plans some repair work for 2014. Located at the entrance to the Manistique River just off US 2 in Manistique. In 2000 the Corps of Engineers replaced the concrete breakwater with rip rap, cutting off public access to the lighthouse, but in recent years access has been restored. Accessible in good weather by walking the pier, and there are also views from Lakeview Park just off US 2. Site open, tower closed. Owner: private. Site manager: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. ARLHS USA-469; USCG 7-21475.
Seul Choix Light
Seul Choix Light, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Heidi Raatz

Delta County (Escanaba Area) Lighthouses

Green Bay Entrance Lighthouses
Note: Green Bay is a large embayment on the northwestern shore of Lake Michigan, separated from the main part of the lake by Wisconsin's Door Peninsula and a series of islands.
Poverty Island
1874. Inactive since 1976. 60 ft (18 m) brick tower, painted white, attached to a 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. The lantern was removed in 1976 and abandoned on the beach; in 1989 it was salvaged, restored, and installed at Sand Point Light in Escanaba. 300 mm lens (1982) mounted on top of capped tower. The brick assistant keeper's house has recently collapsed in ruins. Corrugated steel fog signal building (1885) and oil house (1894). Anderson has a good page with several photos, Gary Martin has a 2011 photo, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the complete station, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The surviving buildings are gravely endangered by lack of maintenance, and the station is on the Lighthouse Digest Doomsday List. This fine brick lighthouse, a sibling of the Sturgeon Point Light, deserves much better attention. Located on an island about 8 miles (13 km) south of Fairport. Site and tower closed. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. ARLHS USA-665.
St. Martin Island
1905. Active; focal plane 84 ft (25.5 m); flash every 5 s, alternating red and white. 75 ft (23 m) hexagonal cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, formed by cast iron panels hung between six steel columns. 190 mm lens; the original 4th Fresnel lens on display at Point Iroquois Light (see above). Tower is white, lantern painted black. The original 2-1/2 story brick keeper's house is occupied in season by a caretaker. Brick fog signal building. Anderson's page has a good photo, Gary Martin has a fine 2011 photo, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the station, and Bing has a satellite view. The "exoskeletal" design of this lighthouse is unique in the U.S., but Canada has a number of lighthouses built on related designs. The light station is managed by the Little Traverse Bay Band of the Odawa Indian Nation. Located on an island in the Rock Island Passage entrance to Green Bay, about 12 miles southwest of Fairport. Site and tower closed. Owner: U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Site manager: Little Traverse Bay Band. ARLHS USA-802; USCG 7-21450.

Little Bay de Noc Lighthouses
** Point Peninsula (Peninsula Point)
1866. Inactive since 1936. 40 ft (12 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery. Tower unpainted; lantern and gallery painted black. The keeper's house (formerly attached) burned in 1959. Anderson's page has an excellent photo, Kerry Hill has a 2010 photo, a nice closeup photo is available, Schultheiss has a page with two photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the light station, and Google has a satellite view. Although its doors and windows have been removed, the vacant tower is well maintained by the Forest Service. This popular picnic location is also well known for concentrations of monarch butterflies in the early fall. Located at the end of county road 513 on the point separating Big Bay de Noc from Little Bay de Noc east of Escanaba. Site and tower open. Owner: U.S. Forest Service. Site manager: Hiawatha National Forest. ARLHS USA-591.
Minneapolis Shoal
1935. Active; focal plane 82 ft (25 m); white flash every 5 s. 70 ft (21 m) square cylindrical steel and concrete tower with lantern, centered on a square concrete keeper's quarters, mounted on a concrete and stone crib. Tower is unpainted white concrete with a single red horizontal band; lantern painted black. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. The original 4th order Fresnel lens was recently removed; its whereabouts is unknown. Sibling of Lansing Shoal Light (above). Anderson's page has good aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Huelse has a historic postcard view, but the light is barely visible in Bing's satellite view. Located about 10 miles (16 km) south of Peninsula Point in the entrance to Little Bay de Noc and Escanaba Harbor. Accessible only by boat; visible on the horizon from Peninsula Point. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-500; USCG 7-21610.
**** Sand Point (Escanaba (1))
1867. Inactive since 1939 (an unofficial light has been displayed since 1989). 41 ft (12.5 m) square cylindrical brick tower attached church-style to a 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Original lantern removed 1939; lantern from Poverty Island Light installed 1987. A 4th order Fresnel lens, transferred in 1989 from the Menominee North Pier Light, is mounted in the lantern. Building painted white, lantern black; lantern and keeper's quarters roofs are red. C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, Bash has a good photo, Anderson has a good page for the lighthouse, Bryan Penberthy has a photo by Dennis Kent, Schultheiss also has a good page on this lighthouse, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. One of two Sand Point Lights in Michigan, the other being at Baraga (see the Western Upper Peninsula page). Used as Coast Guard housing for many years, the building was substantially altered. It has been restored to its original shape and appearance by the Delta County Historical Society, which operates the light station as a museum. In 2004 the boathouse was restored, and the Society also plans to rebuild the demolished fog signal building. Located in Ludington Park at the end of Ludington Street in downtown Escanaba. Site open, museum open daily late May through early September. Owner/site manager: Delta County Historical Society. ARLHS USA-726.
Escanaba (2)
1938. Active; focal plane 45 ft (14 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 40 ft (12 m) 2-stage square cylindrical steel tower mounted on concrete crib. Tower painted white with a single horizontal green band. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. Dan Baldini has a closeup photo, C. Wells has a view from the shore, the Coast Guard has a closeup historic photo, and Google has a satellite view and a very distant satellite view. Located offshore from the north side of Sand Point; good view from the Sand Point Light. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-275; USCG 7-21635.
Sand Point Light
Sand Point Light, Escanaba, August 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey

Menominee County Lighthouses

[Cedar River Range]
1889 (front light) and 1891 (rear light). Inactive since about 1912. Both lighthouses, square pyramidal wood skeletal towers, have been demolished. The original 1-1/2 story brick and wood keeper's house and brick oil house survive. Anderson has a good page for the light station with several photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The house is a private residence. Helge Rosen has a photo of a faux lighthouse (part of the Lighthouse Inn) across the street from the original location. Located on the south side of Big Cedar River and the west side of MI 35 in Cedar River, about 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Menominee. Visible at a distance. Site closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-942 (front) and 1071 (rear).
* Menominee (Marinette) North Pierhead
1927. Active; focal plane 46 ft (14 m); red light occulting every 4 s. 34 ft (10 m) octagonal pyramidal cast iron tower mounted on a concrete platform over a crib at the end of the pier; solar-powered 300 mm lens. Original 4th order Fresnel lens transferred to Sand Point Light, Escanaba, in 1989. Tower painted red with a black lantern; concrete base is white. Heidi Blanton's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page with good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, as well as an older photo of the station in its original form, and Google has a satellite view. In 2005, the lighthouse became available for transfer under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act, and it was transferred to the city of Menominee. However, the city has largely ignored the lighthouse, and by 2013 it was in deteriorating condition and much in need of maintenance. The city launched an effort to seek grant funding for restoration. Located on the pier at the end of Harbor Drive off First Street in Menominee; the adjoining area is set aside as Lighthouse Ann Arbor Park. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of Menominee. ARLHS USA-490; USCG 7-21935.
* Menominee (Marinette) North Pier
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 59 ft (18 m), continuous red light. 50 ft (15 m) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with gallery, painted red. Pepper has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the Menominee North Pier about 600 ft (180 m) from the pierhead lighthouse. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. USCG 7-21940.

Menominee North Pierhead Light, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Heidi Blanton

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

  • Cedar River has a faux lighthouse at the Lighthouse Inn, close to the location of the original Cedar River Range Lights.

Adjoining pages: North: Western Ontario | South: Western Lower Peninsula | Southwest: Eastern Wisconsin | West: Western Upper Peninsula

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index

Posted May 2005. Checked and revised February 10, 2014. Lighthouses: 50. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.