Lighthouses of the United States: Michigan's Western Lower Peninsula

The U.S. state of Michigan comes in two parts: the Lower Peninsula (between Lakes Huron and Michigan) and the Upper Peninsula (between Lakes Michigan and Superior). Putting the two together, the state has an astonishingly long coastline, so it is not surprising that Michigan has more lighthouses than any other U.S. state, by quite a large margin. The Directory has information on more than 130 sites. 

This lighthouse heritage is well recognized. Michigan is the only state that supports lighthouse preservation with a program of annual grants from the state to local preservation groups. All over the state, volunteers are working hard to save and restore lighthouses. There is a state preservation society, the Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy, and the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association is also based in the state.

This page includes lighthouses of the west coast of the Lower Peninsula, which faces Lake Michigan. There's another page for the east coast.

Aids to navigation in Michigan are maintained by the U.S. Coast Guard Ninth District, but ownership (and sometimes operation) of historic lighthouses has been transferred to local authorities and preservation organizations in many cases.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. USCG numbers are from Volume VII of the United States Coast Guard Light List.

General Sources
Seeing the Lights: The Lighthouses of Michigan
A wonderful site by Terry Pepper, with fine photos, accounts of recent visits to many of the lighthouses, and extensive historical information.
Michigan Lighthouses
Excellent photos and information posted by Kraig Anderson.
Lighthouses of the Great Lakes
Maintained by Neil Schultheiss, this very fine site has excellent photos and accounts for most of the state's lighthouses.
Lake Michigan Lighthouses
Photos by C.W. Bash.
Lighthouse Hunters - Lower Michigan
Photos and accounts by Christine & Tom Cardaci.
Lighthouses of the Great Lakes
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses in Michigan, United States
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
National Maritime Inventory - Michigan
National Park Service inventory of Michigan lighthouse data.
Coast Guard Lighthouses - Michigan
Historic photos and notes, posted by the U.S. Coast Guard Historian's office.
Leuchttürme USA auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.
Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association
GLLKA encourages lighthouse preservation throughout the Great Lakes states, but it is best known for its work preserving the Round Island and St. Helena Island Lights in the Straits of Mackinac area. The association has an excellent blog.
Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy
This organization is dedicated to the preservation of lighthouses and life saving stations throughout the state.
Great Lakes Lighthouse Festival
Based in Alpena, the festival is held annually in mid October and supports preservation efforts, especially for lighthouses of northwest Lake Huron and the Mackinac Straits area.
Michigan Lighthouse Fund
A non-profit organization, the fund channels state grants and private donations to support Michigan lighthouses.

White River Light
White River Light, White Hall, May 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Anne Hornyak

Grand Haven Pierhead Lights
South Pierhead Lights, Grand Haven, November 2013
Flickr Creative Commons photo by ellerbh888

Berrien County Lighthouses
* St. Joseph (Benton Harbor) North Pierhead Inner
1907. Active; focal plane 53 ft (16 m); continuous white light. 53 ft (16 m) octagonal steel tower mounted on square 1-story cast iron fog signal building, built midway in the pier; 4th order Fresnel lens. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery black; fog signal building roof is red. Corey Seeman's is at right, Anderson's page has winter photos, Teresa Forrest has a good photo of both St. Joseph lights, Tom Gill has a photo, Wikimedia has Russell Sekeet's photo, and Google has a satellite view. The pier lights replaced an 1859 onshore lighthouse, which was demolished for a parking lot in 1955. In 2008 the St. Joseph lighthouses became available for transfer under NHLPA, and the City of St. Joseph applied for ownership. The National Park Service recommended acceptance of this application. An engineering survey in the summer of 2008 found that the lights needed at least $1 million in restoration before they could be opened to the public. In late 2012, the 4th order Fresnel lens was removed for restoration and display at the St. Joseph Heritage Museum. The city took ownership of both lighthouses in a ceremony on 8 October 2013. The city estimates restoration will now require about $2 million. A contract for an engineering study was awarded in November, and a fundraising campaign was launched in 2014 with an initial gift of $100,000. It is hoped that restoration can be carried out in 2015. Located on the north side of the St. Joseph River entrance adjacent to Tiscornia City Park in Benton Harbor. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, towers closed. Owner/site manager: City of St. Joseph. ARLHS USA-797; USCG 7-19520.
* St. Joseph (Benton Harbor) North Pierhead Outer
1906. Active; focal plane 31 ft (9.5 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 30 ft (9 m) round cast iron tower built at the end of the pier. The original 5th order Fresnel lens is on display at the St. Joseph Heritage Museum in St. Joseph. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery black. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. The original catwalk links this tower to the inner tower and to shore. Sibling of the South Haven tower (previous entry). Tom Gill's photo is at right, Anderson has winter photos, Teresa Forrest has a good photo of both St. Joseph lights, Wikimedia has Russell Sekeet's photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the pier. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of St. Joseph. ARLHS USA-798; USCG 7-19515.
St. Joseph North Pierhead Lights
Pierhead Lights, St. Joseph, June 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Corey Seeman

Van Buren County Lighthouse
* South Haven South Pierhead (2)
1903 (relocated 1913 when the pier was extended). Station established 1872. Active; focal plane 37 ft (11 m); continuous red light. 35 ft (10.5 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, 5th order Fresnel lens (1902, transferred from earlier tower) still in use. Tower painted red, lantern black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s) as needed. Anderson's page has winter photos, Lighthouse Digest has published a history of the light station, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This lighthouse, a shorter version of the Muskegon South Pierhead Light, replaced an 1872 wood tower. In 1913, the pier was extended and the lighthouse was relocated 425 ft (130 m) to its new ending. A cast iron catwalk links the tower to shore. The 2-1/2 story wood, hipped-roof keeper's house (1872), located at 91 Michigan Avenue onshore, was transferred to the city for preservation in 2000. The Michigan Maritime Museum has renovated the keeper's house as the Marialyce Canonie Great Lakes Research Library; Google has a good street view of the museum. For a number of years the museum's web site stated that the museum was "in the process" of acquiring the lighthouse. However, when the lighthouse became available under NHLPA in 2010, South Haven City Council approved an application by the Historical Association of South Haven, and in October 2011 that group was awarded ownership. The Association launched a fund drive; it's thought that about $350,000 is needed for restoration. Ownership was transferred in a rededication ceremony on 9 August 2012. In late 2014, the maritime museum applied for a grant to repairs to the keeper's house. Located at the end of the pier at the foot of Water Street in South Haven. Accessible by walking the pier; parking in adjacent city park. Site open, tower closed except for an open house during the city's mid-June Harborfest. Owner/site manager: Historical Association of South Haven. ARLHS USA-772; USCG 7-19505.

Allegan County Lighthouses
* Saugatuck (replica)
2002 replica of 1859 lighthouse. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one end of a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. Entire building painted with red and white horizontal bands. Andrew Nicolle has a 2007 photo, Teresa Forrest has a fine closeup, and Google has a good satellite view and a fuzzy street view. The replica is located at Union and Hamilton Streets in Douglas, on the south side of the Saugatuck River. (For a decade it was adjacent to the historic passenger steamship Keewatin, as seen in another of Forrests's photos, but the Keewatin was sold in 2012 and relocated to its original home port of Port MacNicoll, Ontario.) Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown.
* [Saugatuck (Kalamazoo River) Pierhead Lights (2)]
Date of modern lights unknown; pierhead lights established 1909 (south pier) and 1914 (north pier) . Active; north pierhead light focal plane 25 ft (7.5 m), green flash every 4 s; south pierhead light focal plane 31 ft (10.5 m), green flash every 4 s. Two 20 ft (6 m) cylindrical steel posts topped by navigation lights; both towers painted white, north pier tower with a single green band and south pier tower with a single red band. Fog horn (blast every 15 s as needed) on the south light. The light station was established in 1839; the 1859 lighthouse (inactive since 1914) was destroyed by a tornado on 3 April 1956. Salvaged portions of the 1859 building are incorporated in a faux lighthouse on the site (private residence). Lighthouse Digest has an article on the history of the light station, and Google has a satellite view of the two piers. Located on the breakwaters protecting the river entrance northwest of Saugatuck. Reportedly accessible from a public parking area at the end of Riverside Drive. Site open, towers closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1266 (south) and 413 (north); USCG 7-19445 (south) and 19450 (north).

Ottawa County Lighthouses
* Holland Harbor South Pierhead (3) ("Big Red")
1936 (station established 1872). Active: focal plane 52 ft (16 m); flash every 10 s, alternating red and white. 45 ft (13.5 m) square cylindrical steel-clad wood tower with lantern and gallery (1936) mounted on a 2-story steel-clad brick keeper's house (1907); 250 mm lens (1932). Entire building painted red. The original 6th order Fresnel lens (1907) is on display at the Holland Museum. Rodney Campbell's photo is at right, Anderson's page also has good photos, Lighthouse Digest has a feature article on the lighthouse, and Google has a satellite view and a very distant street view. In 2000-01, protests forced state park officials to drop a plan to charge portrait photographers $325 for photos taken with the lighthouse as a background. In 2005, the lighthouse was offered for transfer under NHLPA; the Holland Harbor Lighthouse Historical Commission was the only applicant. In February 2007 title to the lighthouse was transferred to the Commission. Located on the south pier at the harbor entrance in Macatawa, west of Holland. Accessible by a walk of about 1/2 mile (800 m) one way; visitors must park at the entrance to the gated Macatawa community, where parking is limited to 90 minutes. There are excellent views from Holland State Park, at the end of Ottawa Beach Road on the north (opposite) side of the entrance. Site open to out-of-state visitors Monday through Friday but to others only on Tuesdays and Thursdays, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Holland Harbor Lighthouse Historical Commission. ARLHS USA-375; USCG 7-19295.
* [Grand Haven Main (2)]
1855 (station established 1839). Inactive since 1905. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Tri-Cities Historical Museum in Grand Haven. The light tower of this "schoolhouse" lighthouse was demolished in 1910, but the 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house continued to serve the pierhead lights. The building was sold as a private residence in 1956. John Kulpa has contributed a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a high bluff overlooking the south side of the harbor entrance. Site closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-327.
* Grand Haven South Pierhead Outer
1905. Active; focal plane 42 ft (13 m); red flash every 10 s. 36 ft (11 m) square cylindrical lantern mounted on a cast iron-clad wood fog signal building (1875), built on the end of the pier; 190 mm lens. The 4th order Fresnel lens of the Grand Haven Main Light (previous entry) was used here until the 1970s; it is now on display at the Tri-Cities Historical Museum's Depot Museum of Transportation. Entire building painted red. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s) as needed. A photo is at the top of this page, Hank Roeters has a good 2008 photo, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. The catwalk (1922) linking both lighthouses to shore was renovated in 1987-88 after citizen protests stopped the Coast Guard from demolishing it. The Coast Guard renovated the lighthouse in spring and early summer 2001. In 2009 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA, and in December 2012 ownership was transferred to the city (see next entry). In 2014 the lighthouse was "re-skinned" with new corrugated metal siding. Located on South Harbor Street in Grand Haven adjacent to Grand Haven State Park. Both lighthouses are accessible in good weather by walking the pier. Site open, towers closed. Owner: City of Grand Haven. Site manager: Grand Haven Lighthouse Conservancy. ARLHS USA-1078; USCG 7-18965.
Holland Harbor Light
Holland Harbor Light, Holland, July 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Rodney Campbell
* Grand Haven South Pierhead Inner (2)
1907 (station established 1881). Active; focal plane 52 ft (16 m); red light occulting every 4 s. 51 ft (15.5 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery built about midway on the pier; 250 mm lens. Entire lighthouse painted red. Sibling of the Muskegon South Pierhead Light. The original 6th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Tri-Cities Historical Museum in Grand Haven. A photo is at the top of this page, Anderson's page has information and photos for both towers, Ted Andes has a photo also showing both towers, a webcam provides a current view of both towers, Lighthouse Digest has an October 2001 feature article on all the Grand Haven lighthouses, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view and a very distant street view. In 2009 the two Grand Haven lighthouses became available for transfer under NHLPA. The animal rights group PETA initially expressed interest in acquiring them for a "fish empathy" center, but it withdrew its bid in August. A new consortium, the Grand Haven Lighthouse Conservancy, was formed to apply for ownership. In November 2009 the City Council approved the Conservancy's proposal, but in February 2010 the National Park Service rejected the application. The City of Grand Haven then agreed to take ownership and lease the lights to the Conservancy, and in June 2010 the park service accepted the city's application. A lighthouse endowment fund has been established. In December 2012 the Coast Guard completed repairs to the two lighthouses and transferred ownership to the city. In April 2013, the lighthouse conservancy announced that it had $400,000 available for restoration of the lighthouses, and city council accepted $260,000 of these funds to repaint the lighthouses. The repainting of this light was completed in the summer of 2013, and the two lighthouses were rededicated in August 2014. Located on South Harbor Street in Grand Haven adjacent to Grand Haven State Park. Both lighthouses are accessible in good weather by walking the pier. Owner: City of Grand Haven. Site manager: Grand Haven Lighthouse Conservancy. ARLHS USA-1077; USCG 7-18975.

Muskegon County Lighthouses
Muskegon South Breakwater
Active; focal plane 70 ft (21 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 53 ft (16 m) square pyramidal steel tower mounted on a square steel equipment room. Entire structure painted red. Fog horn (2 blasts every 20 s) as needed. A photo shows the lighthouse with the tall ship Europa in 2003, Michael Melzer has a photo, Pepper has a fine page for the Muskegon lighthouses, Anderson's page also has good photos, and Google has a satellite view. In 2008 the Muskegon lighthouses became available for transfer under NHLPA, and in June 2010 ownership was transferred to the Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy. Located at the end of the south outer breakwater at Muskegon. Accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed (guided tours can be arranged). Owner/site manager: Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy (Muskegon Lights). ARLHS USA-518; USCG 7-18705.
Muskegon South Pierhead
1903. Active; focal plane 50 ft (15 m); red flash every 4 s. 48 ft (14.5 m) round cast iron tower at the end of the breakwater; 300 mm lens. Entire lighthouse painted red. The former Coast Guard station at the foot of the pier now houses a NOAA research facility and seasonal Coast Guard detachment. Elizabeth Beers's photo is at right, Pepper has a fine page for the Muskegon lighthouses, Anderson's page has a good photo showing both light and station, a 2009 photo is available, a view from the lake is available, and Google has a satellite view. The NOAA Lake Michigan Field Station is located in the former U.S. Coast Guard Station adjacent to the pier and lighthouse. In 2008 the Muskegon lighthouses became available for transfer under NHLPA, and in June 2010 ownership was transferred to the Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy. In June 2013, the Conservancy announced plans for a $500,000 restoration of the two Muskegon lighthouses; fundraising is underway. In June 2014, the conservancy began opening the lighthouse for tours on Friday evenings before Movies at the Beach presentations. Located at the end of the south pier at the harbor entrance, at Fulton and Beach Streets in Muskegon. Site open, tower open on special occasions (guided tours can be arranged). Owner: Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy (Muskegon Lights). ARLHS USA-1082; USCG 7-18710.
**** White River
1876. Inactive since 1960. 38 ft (11.5 m) octagonal cylindrical limestone tower attached to a 1-1/2 story Norman Gothic limestone keeper's house. The building is unpainted stone; lantern painted black. The lighthouse is a museum, and the original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display. Anne Hornyak's photo is at the top of this page, Pepper has a great page for the light, Anderson has several good photos, Lighthouse Digest had a feature article in February 2002, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse marked the entrance to White Lake, a lagoon connected to Lake Michigan by a short canal; it was replaced by a D9 tower (USCG 7-18650) on the north breakwater at the canal entrance. Local citizens contributed the funds to buy the light station when it was decommissioned. A state grant provided exterior restoration and trim painting in 2000. In 2010, budget cuts forced the township to consider a drastic reduction in its support for the lighthouse. In October 2011, township officials agreed with the Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association on a plan for the Association to assume operation of the lighthouse museum. SPLKA also has a page for the light station. Located at the end of Murray Road in Wabaningo, west of White Hall. Site open, museum and tower open daily except Monday, June through October. Owner: Fruitland Township. Site manager: White River Light Station. ARLHS USA-885.
Muskegon South Pierhead Light
South Pierhead Light, Muskegon, February 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Elizabeth Brixton

Oceana County Lighthouses
**** Little Sable
1874 (O.M. Poe). Active (privately maintained); focal plane 108 ft (33 m); white flash every 6 s. 107 ft (32.5 m) unpainted round red brick tower with lantern and gallery, original 3rd order Fresnel lens still in use. Lantern painted black. A classic Poe tower. Sadly, the keeper's quarters and all the other light station buildings were demolished in 1955. C.M. Hanchey's photo is at right, Steve Philp has a closeup showing the lens, Britten has an excellent photo, Anderson's page has a portfolio of great photos, Wikimedia has several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Lighthouse Digest has a March 2001 article on the history of the light station. Although no one has listed this lighthouse as endangered, it stands just off the beach and appears threatened by erosion. The lighthouse was formerly painted white, but the paint was sandblasted away in 1977. In 2002, the Big Sable Point Lighthouse Keepers Association began negotiating to lease the tower; this finally happened in December 2005, allowing the lighthouse to be opened to the public in 2006. The association has since changed its name to the Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association. Access to the lighthouse was improved greatly in 2010, when a paved walkway through the dunes was completed. Located off Silver Lake Road near Mears, south of Ludington. Site open (park entry fee), tower open daily from late May through late September (small donation requested). Owner: Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Site manager/operator: Silver Lake State Park and Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association. ARLHS USA-443; USCG 7-18645.
Pentwater South Pierhead (2)
1937 (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 48 ft (14.5 m); red flash every 4 s. 34 ft (10 m) square pyramidal skeletal tower with a small enclosure in the lower portion. Entire tower painted red. Anderson's page features a wintry photo, a 2007 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was a wood tower shown in a historic Coast Guard photo. Located at the end of the breakwater on the south side of the harbor entrance. Good views from Mears State Park at the foot of Lowell Street in Pentwater. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1270; USCG 7-18630.
[Pentwater North Pierhead]
1997. Active; focal plane 43 ft (13 m); green flash every 2.5 s. 35 ft (11 m) white round cylindrical "D9" steel tower with a single horizontal green band. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. Anderson has a good closeup photo. Located at the end of the breakwater on the north side of the harbor entrance. There are good views from Charles Mears State Park at the foot of Lowell Street in Pentwater. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-594; USCG 7-18620.
Little Sable Light
Little Sable Light, Stony Lake, August 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.M. Hanchey

Mason County Lighthouses
* [Ludington South Breakwater (2)]
1960s (station established 1910). Active; focal plane 30 ft (9 m); red flash every 2.5 s. 25 ft (7.5 m) white round cylindrical "D9" steel tower with a single horizontal red band. Steven Pierce has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater; clearly visible from the North Breakwater Light. Accessible in calm weather by walking the pier. Site open, closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1081; USCG 7-18555.
*** Ludington North Breakwater (2)
1924 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 55 ft (17 m); green light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 57 ft (17.5 m) square pyramidal steel tower, mounted on a prow-shaped concrete base designed to break the force of storm waves. Lighthouse painted white; lantern is black. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the Rose Hawley Museum at White Pine Village near Ludington. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s) as needed. A good photo is available, the lighthouse has a web page, Anderson has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the city also has a page for the lighthouse, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse replaced an 1871 wood tower. Renovated by the Coast Guard in 1993, the lighthouse has a slight lean, which was not corrected. In 2002, the city of Ludington, the Mason County Historical Society, and the Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association were working on a plan to lease the tower and the nearby Coast Guard station, which was scheduled to be replaced. However, in 2005, the lighthouse became available for transfer under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act. In May 2006, the city's application was approved by the National Park Service, and the transfer to city ownership occurred shortly thereafter. Also in May 2006, the light was changed from white to green to help boaters distinguish it from the lights of the town. The Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association partners with the city in managing the lighthouse. Located at the end of Lakeshore Street, just of MI 116 in downtown Ludington. Accessible in calm weather by walking the pier; there's also a good view from the S.S. Badger ferry linking Ludington to Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Site open, tower open daily late May through early September, weather permitting. Owner: City of Ludington. Site manager: Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association. ARLHS USA-460; USCG 7-18530.
**** Big Sable Point
1867. Active (privately maintained); focal plane 106 ft (32 m); continuous white light. 112 ft (34 m) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, encased since 1900 by steel plates, attached to a 2-story brick keeper's house; 300 mm lens. Lighthouse painted in broad black and white horizontal bands. The original 3rd order Fresnel lens is on display at the Rose Hawley Museum at White Pine Village south of Ludington. The modernized keeper's house is occupied by volunteer keepers for two-week stays during the summer. A photo is at right, Anderson's page has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. Lighthouse Digest has an article on the history of the light station and another on its restoration. The lighthouse was formerly endangered by beach erosion: the fog signal building fell into the lake in 1941, and by 1977 the lake had breached the seawall and was within 4 ft (120 cm) of the tower. Erosion is now controlled by a seawall rebuilt and extended in 1990-93. The Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association works for preservation of the light station; in 1999 association members renovated the interior of the tower. In 2012, a grant from the National Park Service supported restoration of 300 ft (90 m) of the seawall. Located beyond the end of MI 116 north of Ludington. Accessible by a 1.5 mile (2.5 km) hiking trail. Site open, keeper's house and tower open daily May through October; there is a small fee to climb the tower. Owner: Michigan Department of Natural Resources (Ludington State Park). Site manager/operator: Sable Points Lighthouse Keepers Association. ARLHS USA-054; USCG 7-18525.

Big Sable Point Light, Ludington, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Angela

Manistee County Lighthouses
* Manistee Main (2)
1872 (station established 1870). Inactive since 1927. 2-story wood keeper's house; the lantern, formerly mounted on the roof, was removed in 1927. The lighthouse was replaced by the pierhead light. In 1993 it was relocated to the end of 2nd Avenue, west of Melitzer Street, where it is in use as a private residence. GLLKA's blog has an article on this light, including a current photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Site closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-467.
* Manistee North Pierhead (3)
1927 (station established 1900). Active; focal plane 55 ft (17 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 39 ft (12 m) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery; 300 mm lens. Lighthouse painted white; lantern roof and gallery are black. Fog horn (blast every 15 s) as needed. The lighthouse is linked to shore by the pier and by a narrow catwalk, which was restored in the early 1990s. Katy Silberger's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, Joseph Wisdom has another good photo of the lighthouse and catwalk, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has a satellite view. In 2009 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. The City of Manistee applied for ownership, in partnership with the Manistee County Historical Museum, and ownership was transferred on 30 June 2011. In 2013, the state granted $20,000 to fund a historic structures report on needed restoration. Accessible by walking the pier. Located at the end of Fifth Avenue (extension of Memorial Drive) off US 31 in downtown Manistee. A nearby city park provides parking. Site open, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: City of Manistee. Site manager: Manistee County Historical Museum. ARLHS USA-468; USCG 7-18450.
* Portage Lake North Pierhead (3)
Date unknown (station established 1891). Active; focal plane 32 ft (10 m); green flash every 4 s. 20 ft (6 m) round cylindrical "D9" steel tower, painted white with a single green band, mounted on a square 1-story concrete equipment shelter. Fog horn (blast every 15 s) as needed. David Bellmore has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The original light here was a wood pyramidal tower; it was replaced by a skeletal tower in 1930 and by the present tower in recent years. Located at the end of the pier at Portage Point off MI 22 about 10 miles south of Arcadia. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-656; USCG 7-18415.
Manistee North Pierhead Light
North Pierhead Light, Manistee, July 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Katy Silberger

Benzie County Lighthouses
[Frankfort South Breakwater]
Active; focal plane 46 ft (14 m); red flash every 4 s. 40 ft (12 m) round cylindrical steel "D9" tower, painted white with a single red horizontal band. Cameron Downing has a photo showing both Frankfort lights clearly, and Google has a satellite view. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1075; USCG 7-18385.
* Frankfort North Breakwater
1912 (relocated 1932). Active; focal plane 72 ft (22 m); continuous white light. 67 ft (20 m) square pyramidal steel tower with lantern and gallery, on a 2-story square steel base, built at the end of the breakwater. 4th order Fresnel lens in use. Lighthouse painted white; gallery and lantern roof are black. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. Anderson's page has a photo, another good photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was built at the end of the old North Pier in 1912; it then stood 44 ft (13.5 m) tall. The Coast Guard's historic photo shows the lighthouse in its original form. In 1932 the lighthouse was moved to the new North Breakwater and lifted onto the 2-story base. There is an active Coast Guard Station at the foot of the breakwater. In 2010 the lighthouse became eligible for transfer under NHLPA, and in December 2011 it was announced that the lighthouse will be transferred to the City of Frankfort. Located on the north side of the Betsie Lake entrance, south of the foot of Main Street in Frankfort. Accessible in calm weather by walking the breakwater; parking available nearby. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-308; USCG 7-18375.
** Point Betsie
1858. Active; focal plane 52 ft (16 m); white flash every 10 s. 37 ft (11 m) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story brick keeper's house (1895). Lighthouse painted white, lantern black; the house is white with a red roof. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at Sleeping Bear Point Maritime Museum near Glen Arbor. Corrugated steel fog signal building. The keeper's house, formerly used for Coast Guard housing, has been empty since 1996. A photo is at right, Anderson's page also has good photos, and Google has a satellite view. The station is threatened by beach erosion, which is controlled by a seawall and several groins. For several years this beautiful lighthouse deteriorated while bureaucrats tried to figure out what to do with it. In early 2000 the Coast Guard began searching for a local group to take over control of the lighthouse. In November 2000, Benzie County agreed to take temporary custody of the light station, and in January 2001 the county signed a lease agreement with the Coast Guard. A state grant of $10,000 in 2001 supported preparation of a preservation plan. A support group, Friends of Point Betsie Lighthouse, was launched and preservation architects were hired. During summer 2002 volunteers worked on exterior repairs to the building. In September 2003, the state awarded a $431,500 grant to launch interior restoration. Ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to the county in June 2004. Restoration of the exterior began in the fall of 2005. The lantern, formerly white with a red roof, was repainted in the original black. Located at the end of Point Betsie Road, off MI 22 about 5 miles (8 km) north of Frankfort. Site open, lighthouse open Saturdays and Sundays Memorial Day (late May) through Columbus Day (early October), also Fridays in July and August; tower closed. Owner: Benzie County. Site manager: Friends of Point Betsie Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-616; USCG 7-18370.

Point Betsie Light, Frankfort, September 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by xray10

Leelanau County Lighthouses
* Manning (Robert H. Manning Memorial, Empire)
1991. Active (privately maintained); focal plane 38 ft (11.5 m); white flash every 4 s. Approx. 35 ft (11 m) round cylindrical stucco-clad wood tower, painted white; lantern painted black. Martin van Duijn has a fine 2007 closeup, Anderson also has photos, and Google has a satellite view. Designed to resemble the tower of the Point Betsie Light, this lighthouse was built by the family and friends of Robert H. Manning, who had spoken throughout his life about the need for a lighthouse at Empire. Located in Empire Beach Park on Lake Street (South Lake Michigan Drive) in Empire. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Village of Empire. ARLHS USA-1268; USCG 7-18366.
** South Manitou Island (2)
1858 (station established 1840). Inactive since 1872. 2-1/2 story brick keeper's house; the light tower was removed in 1872. The building remained in use as the keeper's house for the 1872 lighthouse (next entry). ARLHS USA-1328.
** South Manitou Island (3)
1872 (O.M. Poe). Reactivated (inactive 1958-2009, now maintained by the National Park Service); focal plane about 105 ft (32 m); continuous white light. 104 ft (31.5 m) round brick tower attached to a 2-1/2 story brick keeper's house (1858). Fog signal building (1875). Anderson's page has several good photos, Lighthouse Digest has an October 2002 article, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. The light was deactivated in favor of a buoy off the end of the South Manitou Island Shoal. The lighthouse was formerly endangered by beach erosion, which is now controlled by a seawall. The National Park Service, which has a page for the lighthouse, is working on restoration of the light station. In 2008, Park Service workers repaired the stairs and lantern room and installed an acrylic replica of the original 3rd order lens. The lighthouse was reactivated on 30 May 2009. Located on the southeast corner of the island, within walking distance of the ferry dock and island visitor center. Accessible by passenger ferry from Leland. Site open (park entry fee), visitor center open daily mid-May through October, tower open to guided tours in season. Owner: U.S. National Park Service. Site manager: Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. ARLHS USA-773; USCG 7-18357.
South Manitou Island Light
South Manitou Island Light, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by tde1973
North Manitou Shoal
1935. Active; focal plane 79 ft (23 m); red flash every 15 s. 63 ft (19 m) square cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 2-story square steel keeper's house, mounted on concrete crib; solar-powered light (2000). The original box-type Fresnel lens is on display at the Cannery Boathouse Museum of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. Lighthouse painted white with black trim; lantern black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 20 s) as needed. Sibling of DeTour Reef Light in Lake Huron. Bryan Penberthy has a photo by Dennis Kent, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and the Coast Guard has a historic photo. A preservation group for the lighthouse was formed in 2000, but it has not been active recently. Located midway between North Manitou Island and the mainland. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-554; USCG 7-18340.
**** Grand Traverse (Northport) (2)
1858 (station established 1852). Inactive since 1972. 47 ft (14.5 m) square cylindrical brick tower rising from a 2-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Building painted white, roof red, lantern black. Brick fog signal building (1899) and oil house. Diaphone fog signal (1934, inactive since 1966) restored in 2000 and operated on Saturdays in the summer. The modern light (1972; focal plane 50 ft (15 m); white flash every 6 s) is on a 41 ft (12.5 m) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower. Kathy Irwin's photo is at right, an article in the Northern Michigan Journal has the history of the light station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The light station is a museum; a 4th order Fresnel lens used at the Alpena Light in eastern Michigan is on display. The Grand Traverse Lighthouse Foundation has worked since 1987 to restore and maintain the lighthouse. In 2001, a state grant of $14,500, matched by private donations, was used to repaint the building. The 150th anniversary of the light station was celebrated on July 20, 2002. Lighthouse Digest has a March 2003 feature on preservation efforts. Ownership of the light station was transferred to the state on September 22, 2003. In 2006, an urgent appeal was made for $45,000 needed for urgent repair of moisture damage to the foundation and floor joists. Since 2004, volunteer keepers spend one-week tours of duty at the lighthouse during the summer, and in 2009 the lighthouse was opened for one-night stays during the winter season. Located at the end of MI 201 on the point separating Traverse Bay from Lake Michigan. Site open (state park entry fee), museum and tower open daily May through October, also weekends in November. Owner: Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources (Leelanau State Park). Site manager: Grand Traverse Lighthouse Museum. ARLHS USA-332; USCG 7-18110.
Grand Traverse Light
Grand Traverse Light, Northport, September 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Kathy Irwin
South Fox Island (1)
1867. Inactive since 1934. 45 ft (13.5 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached church-style to a brick keeper's house. The 4th order Fresnel lens from this lighthouse is now displayed in the tower of the Old Presque Isle Light (see the Eastern Lower Peninsula page). Building painted white, lantern white with a red roof. Anderson's page has wintry aerial photos, Ken Scott has a 2009 aerial view, Bash has a 2005 view from the lake, and Google has a satellite view. For many years the lighthouse was abandoned and endangered by neglect. In October 2000 the state proposed a land swap with David Johnson, the developer who owns most of the island; the swap would have placed the light station under private control. Strong opposition from preservationists led the developer to scale back his plans in November 2001, leaving the station in state ownership. In late 2004, the Fox Island Lighthouse Association was organized to work for restoration of the South Fox Island lighthouses. Volunteers have been working steadily since then, and there has been considerable progress in stabilizing and refurbishing the light station buildings. Located at the southernmost tip of the island. Accessible only by boat; passenger ferry service is available and camping on the island is permitted. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Site manager: Fox Island Lighthouse Association. ARLHS USA-771.
South Fox Island (2)
1905 (relocated here in 1934). Inactive since 1959. 60 ft (18 m) square pyramidal cast iron "Sanibel class" skeletal tower with central cylinder, lantern, and gallery. Originally built in 1905 at Sapelo Island, Georgia, the lighthouse was dismantled and transferred to this site in 1934. Anderson has wintry aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The Coast Guard has a photo of South Fox Island showing both towers as well as a historic photo of this tower at Sapelo Island. When it was active, the lighthouse was painted white, with a black lantern and watch room; today it is mostly black with rust. In late 2004, the Fox Island Lighthouse Association was organized to work for restoration of both South Fox Island lighthouses. Located adjacent to the earlier lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Site manager: Fox Island Lighthouse Association. ARLHS USA-1327.

Grand Traverse County Lighthouses
** Mission Point (1)
1870. Inactive since 1933. 30 ft (9 m) square cylindrical wood tower mounted schoolhouse-style on a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. Building painted white. A photo is at right, Anderson's page has good photos, Wikipedia's article has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Famous for its location precisely on the 45th parallel, the lighthouse was discontinued because it fails to warn ships away from extensive shoals north of the point. It was transferred first to the state in the 1940s and then to Peninsula Township in 1948. It served for many years as a park manager's residence, but in 2008 it opened to the public. Volunteer keepers are needed for stays in the rear of the structure. Located at the end of MI 37 at Old Mission Point, which divides Traverse Bay into east and west bays. Site open, the tower will be open; check the township website for schedule information. Owner/site manager: Peninsula Township. ARLHS USA-504.
Mission Point (2)
1933? Active; focal plane 41 ft (12.5 m); white flash every 6 s. 25 ft (7.5 m) round cylindrical steel tower rising from a square 1-story equipment room and mounted on a circular crib. A 2010 view is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located offshore from the old lighthouse; easily seen from the shore. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1098; USCG 7-18145.
Old Mission Point Light
Old Mission Point Light, Peninsula Township, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by tde1973

Charlevoix County Lighthouses
Note: Charlevoix County includes Beaver Island, the largest island of Lake Michigan. The island is 13 mi (21 km) long and 6 mi (10 km) wide; its permanent population of about 550 is augmented by summer visitors. The island is accessible in season by ferry from Charlevoix (reservations strongly suggested).
* Charlevoix South Pierhead (2)
1948 (station established 1885). Active; focal plane 41 ft (12.5 m); red flash every 4 s. Approx. 40 ft (12 m) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower, upper 2/3 enclosed. Lighthouse painted red, lantern black. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. Anderson's page has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This relatively modern light replaced an 1885 wood tower. The keeper's house was demolished in 1984, and the land on which it stood is now a city park. In 2005, the lighthouse became available for transfer under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act, and in 2008 it was transferred to the City of Charlevoix. In 2008, windows were replaced in a project to make the structure watertight. In 2009 the formerly-white lighthouse was repainted red, its color prior to 1968. A July 2010 photo shows the new color. Restoration of the interior is in progress. A web site for the lighthouse has been launched. Located on the pierhead at the foot of Grant Street in downtown Charlevoix, 2 blocks west of US 31. Parking available near the lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner: City of Charlevoix. Site manager: Charlevoix Historical Society. ARLHS USA-156; USCG 7-17925.
* St. James (Beaver Island Harbor, Whiskey Point) (2)
1870 (station established 1856). Active; focal plane 38 ft (11.5 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 41 ft (12.5 m) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery; original 4th order Fresnel lens. Tower painted white, lantern black. The keeper's house, formerly attached, was demolished in the 1940s. Anderson has a good page with several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo showing the lighthouse attached to the keeper's house, and Google has a satellite view. In October 2000, the township secured a ten-year lease on the structure. In 2003, an inspection by GLLKA found "the tower to be in somewhat poor condition, with moisture causing serious spalling of the bricks on the tower exterior," according to Terry Pepper. Ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to the township under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act in 2005. Located at the end of Michigan Street at the east side of the harbor entrance in St. James. Site open, tower open occasionally in season. Operator: U.S. Coast Guard. Owner/site manager: St. James Township. ARLHS USA-047; USCG 7-17845.
*** Beaver Head (Beaver Island) (2)
1858 (station established 1852). Inactive since 1962. 46 ft (14 m) round cylindrical brick tower attached to a 2-story brick keeper's house (1866). The original 4th order Fresnel lens is displayed in the keeper's house. The tower is unpainted light tan brick; the lantern is painted green with a red roof. Brick fog signal building (1915). Anderson's page has aerial and historic photos, Charles Dawley's photo is at right, Bash has a photo of the station, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. Sibling of Point Betsie Light. In 1975 the Charlevoix school district (on the mainland) bought the station for $1 to establish an alternative school for youth aged 16-21. Beginning in 1978, the station was restored in a series of summer work/study programs and then opened as a school. In 2003, a grant was obtained to repair spalling of the exterior brick work, and in 2005 the state granted $23,000 for restoration of the oil house. Located near the southern end of the island. Island accessible in season by ferry from Charlevoix. Site open, tower open daily during the summer months. Owner: Charlevoix Public School System. Site manager: Beaver Island Lighthouse School. ARLHS USA-046.
Gull Island
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 77 ft (23.5 m); white flash every 6 s. 73 ft (22 m) triangular skeletal tower. The tower carries two diamond-shaped daymarks colored in a red and white checkerboard pattern. Bing has a satellite view. Located at the northern tip of Gull Island, a small island about 15 mi (25 km) west of Beaver Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS USA-1115; USCG 7-21530.
Beaver Head Light
Beaver Head Light, Beaver Island, May 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Charles Dawley
Squaw Island
1892. Inactive since 1928. Approx. 15 m (50 ft) octagonal cylindrical brick tower attached to a 2-story brick Norman Gothic keeper's house. The building is unpainted red brick; lantern is painted black. Brick fog signal building and brick oil house. Anderson's page has aerial and historic photos, a good closeup is available, Lighthouse Digest has an article on the history of the light station, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. Private residence. This lighthouse, long abandoned, was in very poor condition until the present owner began restoring it. Located on a remote island 6 miles (10 km) northwest of St. James (Beaver Island). Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-786.

Emmet County Lighthouses
Petoskey (3?)
Date unknown (station establihsed 1880s). Active; focal plane 44 ft (13.5 m); red flash every 2.5 s. 33 ft (10 m) round "D9" round cylindrical steel tower, painted white, on a red square concrete base. A view from the lake is available, and Google has a satellite view. This is one of many modern pierhead lights of similar design throughout the Great Lakes, but it is highly visible and is regarded locally as a lighthouse. In the winter of 2006 a violent storm damaged the breakwater, but the light was not affected. The original lighthouse here, built sometime in the 1880s, was a hexagonal "pagoda" style cast iron tower; it was swept away by a storm in 1924. In 2009, members of the Great Lakes Lighthouse Keepers Association proposed to reconstuct the shell of this lighthouse around the modern light. The Coast Guard rejected this proposal because it does not allow privately maintained lights on major piers. In September 2010, the city council accepted a GLLKA plan to build the replica in Quarry Park, overlooking the harbor on Lewis Street north of Rose Street. The proposed light would have a focal plane of about 90 ft (27 m) and could serve as an aid to navigation. However, nothing had come of this idea as of November 2012. Located at the end of the breakwater at the entrance to the harbor. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1085; USCG 7-17915.
* State Street Pier (Harbor Springs)
1963? Active; focal plane 38 ft (11.5 m); continuous red light. Navigation light mounted atop a cupola centered on the roof of a restaurant on the pier. Charles Dawley has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. This light was installed around the time the Harbor Point lighthouse was deactivated. Located on East Bay Street at the foot of State Street, off MI 119 in downtown Harbor Springs. Site and restaurant open. Site manager: Stafford's Pier Restaurant. ARLHS USA-1326; USCG 7-17865.
Little Traverse (Harbor Point) (1)
1884. Inactive since 1963. 40 ft (12 m) square cylindrical brick tower, unpainted, attached church-style to a 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Lantern painted white with a red roof. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is still mounted in the tower, and a very rare square pyramidal wood fog bell tower (1896) with the original striking mechanism intact is on the point east of the lighthouse. A photo is at right, Anderson's page has photos, D.W. Hike has a winter photo, a 2010 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has historic photos, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse is located at the end of Harbor Point, a gated community in Harbor Springs. Visible from boats entering or leaving the harbor; also visible on harbor tours from Petoskey available in season. Site and tower generally closed; in recent years guided tours have been available once or twice each year. Owner/site manager: Harbor Point Association. ARLHS USA-444.
Littel Traverse Light
Little Traverse Light, Harbor Springs, July 2005
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo
by Bkonrad
Little Traverse (Harbor Point) (2)
1963(?). Active; focal plane 73 ft (22 m), green flash every 6 s. 72 ft (22 m) square steel skeletal tower with gallery, painted white. A photo is above right, Anderson has photos, a 2010 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the point east of the lighthouse. USCG 7-17855.
Ile aux Galets (Skillagalee)
1888. Active; focal plane 58 ft (17.5 m); white flash every 6 s. 58 ft (17.5 m) octagonal brick tower; 300 mm lens (1969). Lighthouse painted white; lantern, watch room, and gallery black. The keeper's house (formerly attached) and all other light station buildings were demolished in 1969. Sibling of the Port Sanilac Light in southeastern Michigan. Anderson's page has wintry aerial photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo of the complete station, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a low island, the highest point of a long sandy shoal, about 8 miles (13 km) west northwest of Cross Village. Accessible only by boat in dangerous waters, and there are no facilities for landing on the island. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-399; USCG 7-17795.
Grays Reef
1936. Active; focal plane 82 ft (25 m); red flash every 10 s. 65 ft (20 m) octagonal cylindrical Art Deco steel tower on square concrete keeper's house, mounted on concrete and stone crib; solar-powered 190 mm lens. The tower is surmounted by a tall antenna. Lighthouse painted white, lantern black. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s) as needed. The original 3-1/2 order Fresnel lens is on display at the Harsha House Museum in Charlevoix. Sibling of the Minneapolis Shoal Light (see Eastern Upper Peninsula). Anderson's page has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and the Coast Guard has a historic photo. In 2013 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. Located 4 miles (6.5 km) west southwest of Waugoshance Island. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-343; USCG 7-17775.
White Shoal
1910. Active; focal plane 125 ft (38 m); white flash every 4 s. 121 ft (37 m) round steel and terra cotta block tower (brick lined), incorporating keeper's house, mounted on a timber and concrete crib; 190 mm lens. The tower is painted with distinctive red and white stripes in a "candy-stripe" spiral pattern (it is the only U.S. lighthouse with this daymark); the lantern and gallery are red. Fog horn (blast every 30 s) as needed. The original bivalve 2nd order Fresnel lens is on display at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point on the Upper Peninsula. Bash's photo (taken on a GLLKA-sponsored lighthouse cruise) is at right, Anderson's page has great photos, and Marinas.com has aerial photos. The Coast Guard has a historic photo of the lighthouse before the spiral daymark was added. In May 2014 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. Located 2.6 miles (4.2 km) northwest of Waugoshance Island. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-886; USCG 7-17750.
White Shoal Light
White Shoal Light, Lake Michigan, January 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Waugoshance
1851. Inactive since 1912. 76 ft (23 m) ruined round brick tower, formerly encased in iron, mounted on a stone crib. Very rare original "birdcage" lantern. A good 2007 photo is available, Anderson's page has wintry aerial photos, and Marinas.com also has aerial photos. Previously used for bombing and strafing practice, the lighthouse is gravely endangered and deteriorating. Lighthouse Digest Doomsday List. The Waugoshance Lighthouse Preservation Society has begun working on the preservation of the lighthouse; the first priority is raising funds to stabilize the building. The Coast Guard authorized the fundraising, and the Society was negotiating a lease on the light station. In 2009 the lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA, and in October 2011 ownership was awarded to the preservation society. In September 2012, the society announced that it had arranged funding for the historic structures report needed before restoration can begin. Located about 2 miles (3 km) northwest of Waugoshance Island. Accessible only by boat in dangerous waters. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Waugoshance Lighthouse Preservation Society. ARLHS USA-874.
*** McGulpins Point (McGulpin Point)
1869. Reactivated (inactive 1906-2009, now maintained by the county); white flash every 4 s. Approx. 40 ft (12 m) octagonal cylindrical brick tower attached to 2-story Norman Gothic brick keeper's house. Anderson's page has good current photos and driving directions, a 2010 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. For many years this lighthouse was a private residence, very well maintained. A 2006 photo is available showing the lighthouse in private ownership. In 2005 the property was for sale for $1.75 million; by early 2008 the price had been lowered to $975,000. With no buyers in sight, Emmet County Commissioners voted in June to purchase the property for $720,000. In April 2009, the Commissioners agreed to purchase two adjoining lots for future parking and a possible museum. Also in April, a replica lantern was installed, and a relighting celebration was held on May 30. The house is being developed as a museum. Located at the end of Headlands Road about 3 miles (5 km) west of Mackinaw City. Site open, lighthouse and tower open daily mid May to early November. Owner: Emmet County. Site manager: McGulpins Point Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-487; USCG 7-12651.
**** Mackinac Point
1892 (John Peter Schmitt). Inactive since 1957. 40 ft (12 m) round cylindrical brick tower attached to 2-story brick Tudor Revival keeper's house. Building unpainted with red roofs; lantern painted black. The original 4th order Fresnel lens, rediscovered in storage after being lost for many years, was returned for display in May 2003. Brick fog signal building (1907). Keith Ewing's photo is at right, Pepper has a good page for the lighthouse, Anderson has a good page with several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a fuzzy street view. After being closed since 1990, the light station was in need of extensive restoration by 2000. Efforts began in 2001 to raise $2.5 million needed to restore the site. In the summer of 2002, state grants repaired the roof and replaced the windows. The lighthouse reopened to visitors on June 12, 2004. In early 2005, the station's barn, which had been relocated, was returned. In late 2006, restoration work began on the barn. Located at the end of Huron Street in Mackinaw City, practically under the "Mighty Mac" (I-75) bridge over the Straits of Mackinac. Site open, fog signal building open daily during the summer, lighthouse and tower open daily from mid May to early October. Owner: Mackinac Island State Park Commission. Site manager: Mackinac State Historic Parks. ARLHS USA-463.
Mackinac Point Light
Mackinac Point Light, Mackinaw City, August 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Keith Ewing

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Eastern Upper Peninsula | East: Eastern Lower Peninsula | South : Indiana

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Checked and revised March 9, 2014. Lighthouses: 42. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.