Lighthouses of Canada: Southern New Brunswick

The Canadian province of New Brunswick has two coastlines. The northern coast faces northeast on the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Northumberland Strait, while the southern coast faces southeast on the Bay of Fundy. The two coasts are separated by a narrow isthmus that joins New Brunswick to Nova Scotia. In addition to its coastal lighthouses, the province has lighthouses along the long estuary of the Saint John River, which empties into the Bay of Fundy. This page lists lighthouses of the southern coast and Saint John River; the northern coast is covered on a separate page.

New Brunswick once had well over 100 lighthouses, but modern deactivations have left it with fewer than 50 working towers. A number of the decommissioned lights survive, some of them relocated to new homes. One, the Woody Point Light, was relocated to Nova Scotia.

Sadly, the province's lighthouse preservation society has disbanded. Local preservation efforts are strong in many communities, but there are a number of lighthouses much in need of restoration.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. CCG numbers are from the Atlantic Coast volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Admiralty numbers are from Volume H of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 110.

General Sources
New Brunswick Canada Lighthouses
Excellent photos with historical and visitor information, from Kraig Anderson's LighthouseFriends.com web site.
Neal's Lighthouse Blog: New Brunswick
Photos and accounts of visits by Neal Doan.
Lighthouses in New Brunswick, Canada
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lighthouses of the St. John River
History and photos by Kelly Anne Loughery, published by Lighthouse Digest in January 2003.
New Brunswick
Ten 2008 photos by C.W. Bash.
Lighthouses in New Brunswick
Photos available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Atlantic Coast of Canada
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Leuchttürme Kanadas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.
List of Lights, Buoys and Fog Signals
Official Canadian light lists.

Head Harbour Light
Head Harbour (East Quoddy Head) Light
Campobello Island, April 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Pauline Rosenberg

Albert County (Chignecto Bay) Lighthouses

Pecks Point
1890 (relocated to Pecks Point in 1908). Inactive since the 1970s. 6.5 m (22 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern but no gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern roof is red. The tower is now covered with vinyl siding. Kelly Anne Loughery has contributed a historic and a modern photo, and Google has a distant street view and a distant satellite view. This lighthouse was originally built at Wards Point and was relocated to Pecks Point in 1908. After deactivation, the station was sold to members of the Tower family. Both the lighthouse and the keeper's house were relocated near Upper Rockport. Located off Lower Rockport Road south of Upper Rockport. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-731.
Grindstone Island (3)
1911 (station established 1859). Inactive 1984-1986 and since 2001. 20.5 m (68 ft) hexagonal concrete tower with six buttresses, lantern and gallery. The original lantern and 4th order Fresnel lens were removed in 1984 and are now in use at the Saint John Harbour lighthouse replica (see below). Kelly Anne Loughery's photo is at right, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was replaced in 1908 by an octagonal wood tower, but just three years later that lighthouse was largely destroyed by a fire. The third and present lighthouse has a design unique in Atlantic Canada. In 1984 it was deactivated and its lantern and Fresnel lens were removed. At the request of local fishermen the light was reactivated in 1986. In 1992 the lantern from the Pease Island light in southern Nova Scotia was installed. Endangered. The future of this now-abandoned light station is unclear, and the lighthouse is deteriorating quickly without maintenance. Most of the island is owned by the Anglican Church of Canada and managed by the Nature Trust of New Brunswick; access requires written permission from the Trust and is never allowed during bird nesting season. Located on an island in Chignecto Bay; visible from nature trails at Mary's Point Bird Sanctuary, at the end of Mary's Point Road off NB 915 at Riverside-Albert. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Grindstone Island Nature Preserve. ARLHS CAN-711; ex-Admiralty H4046.
* Anderson Hollow (3)
1907 (station established 1889). Inactive since the 1950s. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with red trim. No lantern; the light was shone through a square window. It's interesting that this lighthouse has a fake gallery: a non-functional platform was added so that the building presents the traditional pepperpot shape. Roberto Gauvin has a good photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Originally located on the wharf at Waterside, this lighthouse has been relocated several times. Presently it is an exhibit at the Shepody River Dam. Located on Mary's Point Road off NB 915 at Riverside-Albert. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Harvey Bank Interpretive Centre. ARLHS CAN-704.


Grindstone Island Light, 2002
photo copyright Kelly Anne Loughery
used by permission

St. John County Lighthouses

Upper Bay of Fundy Lighthouses
**** Cape Enragé (2)
1870 (station established 1838). Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); green flash every 6 s. 9 m (29 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). 2-story wood keeper's house restored, beginning in 1993, by students from Harrison Trimble High School in Moncton. A photo is at the bottom of this page, Wikimedia has several photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The light station now houses the Cape Enragé Adventure Centre, which offers a variety of activities. Interpretive center and tea room in the keeper's house. Gift shop. A popular tourist stop, Cape Enragé is one of Canada's most successful lighthouse restoration projects. Jeremy D'Entremont wrote a feature article on this light station for the Lighthouse Digest of January 2001. In August 2008, the managers of the lighthouse proposed a plan to have the provincial government take over the light station. Located on Barn Marsh Island, which is connected to the mainland by a causeway, south of Alma off NB 915. Parking provided. Site open, tower open to guided tours mid May through mid October. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Cape Enragé Adventure Centre. ARLHS CAN-096; CCG 157; Admiralty H4060; NGA 11064.
*** St. Martins (Quaco Head (2) lantern)
1983. Inactive. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Doan has a page for the lighthouse, Craig Stephen has a photo, and Google has a good street view but only a distant satellite view of the location. This faux lighthouse was built to display the lantern of the 1883 Quaco Head Light. It is smaller than the original lighthouse, which was a square tower attached to a keeper's house. The building serves during the summer as the tourist information center for the St. Martins area. Located at 424 Main Street in downtown St. Martins. Site open, tower open for climbing whenever the information center is open. Owner/site manager: Village of St. Martins.
* Quaco Head (3)
1976(?) (station established 1835). Active; focal plane 26 m (85 ft); white flash every 10 s. 12 m (39 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to one corner of a 1-story concrete fog signal building. Fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery red. The lantern room of the second lighthouse (1883) is preserved atop the faux lighthouse and visitor center at St. Martins, and the Fresnel lens is displayed at the Quaco Museum, also in St. Martins. Jay Woodworth's photo is at right, Christian Hapgood has a 2008 closeup, and Google has a distant street view and a distant satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the 1883 lighthouse. Located at the end of West Quaco Road, off NB 111 near St. Martins. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-421; CCG 150; Admiralty H4076; NGA 11080.
Quaco Head Light
Quaco Head Light, St. Martins, September 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Jay Woodworth

Saint John Harbour Lighthouses
* Cape Spencer (Red Head) (4)
1983 (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 62 m (204 ft); white flash every 11 s. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) fiberglass tower with lantern and gallery. Upper half of the lighthouse painted red, lower half white. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s) mounted on approx. 5 m (17 ft) skeletal tower. Nearby is the 7.5 m (25 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower that carried the light from 1971 to 1983. Two keeper's houses are now used as private residences. Pat Shaskin's photo is at right, a good 2008 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The skeletal tower in the photos carries the fog signal. Located on a prominent cape at the end of Red Head Road south of East Saint John. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-109; CCG 146; Admiralty H4078; NGA 11088.
Courtenay Bay Breakwater
1927. Active; focal plane 13.5 m (44 ft); red flash every 4 s. 10 m (33 ft) octagonal tower; lantern removed. Bing has a satellite view. There is also a historic photo from World War II, when coastal defense artillery was installed at the lighthouse. Located at the end of a long breakwater on the east side of Saint John Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-906; CCG 104; Admiralty H4083; NGA 11112.
* Saint John Harbour (Grindstone Island lantern and lens)
1985. Inactive (a decorative light is displayed). 10 m (33 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. A closeup photo is available, Wikimedia also has a photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse was built by personnel of the Saint John Coast Guard Base and equipped with a lantern and 4th order Fresnel lens transferred from the Grindstone Island Light (see above). The lighthouse was not intended as an aid to navigation. The base property was sold for waterfront development in 2008, and the Coast Guard initially stated its intention to move the tower to a new base facility. It seems more likely now that the tower wll remain as part of the redevelopment plan. Currently located near the end of the wharf on the former base, on Water Street; visible from across Market Slip. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of Saint John.
* Swift Point (Green Head)
1869. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); green light, 2 s on 10 s off. 14 m (46 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. Doan has a page with photos, Jeremy Cline has a closeup, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse acts as a leading light marking the western entrance to the Saint John River Gorge; ships bound downstream steer directly towards it to find the proper channel. Additional lights on the Saint John River are described below. Located on the west side of the river at the end of a dirt road off Green Head Road on the northwest side of Saint John; the road is gated but the lighthouse is accessible by a walk of about 1.6 km (1 mi). Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-492; CCG 116.
Cape Spencer Light
Cape Spencer Light, East St. John, September 2012
Flickr photo copyright Pat and Gary Shaskin; used by permission
Partridge Island (4)
1961 (station established 1791). Active; focal plane 35 m (116 ft); white flash every 7.5 s. 14 m (45 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, vertical sections painted alternately red and white; lantern is red. Robert Foulis has a closeup photo, Jeremy Cline has a photo, another photo taken from a distance is available, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse is a communications relay station, so it also carries a large microwave antenna. Nearby are foundations of the keeper's house, burned by arsonists in 1999. This is New Brunswick's oldest light station. The original lighthouse burned in 1832. The light station was the site of the world's first steam-powered fog horn in 1859; Lighthouse Digest has a March 2005 article on that invention. The second lighthouse was replaced in 1880; the third was demolished in 1959. Located on an island in Saint John Harbour. Visible from many places around the harbor. Site and tower closed; Coast Guard permission is needed to land on the island. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-365; CCG 100; Admiralty H4082; NGA 11100.
 

Western Saint John County Lighthouse
* Musquash Head (2)
1959 (station established 1879). Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white flash every 3 s. 14 m (46 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with a single red horizontal band; lantern is also red. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). Doan has a page for the lighthouse, Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo, Justin Howe has a closeup, a wider view is available, and Bing has a satellite view. A hiking trail built in the 1990s provides public access to this formerly isolated station. In July 2008 ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to a community group, which will work for its restoration. Located at the end of a dirt road off King William Road at the eastern entrance to Musquash Harbour near Lorneville; accessible by a hike of about 1.5 km (1 mi) round trip. Parking available. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Musquash Head Lightstation, Inc. Site manager: Lorneville Community and Recreation Association. ARLHS CAN-332; CCG 97; Admiralty H4096; NGA 11148.

Charlotte County (Southern Coast) Lighthouses

South Coast and Passamaquoddy Bay Lighthouses
Point Lepreau (3)
1959 (station established 1831). Active; focal plane 25.5 m (84 ft); white flash every 3 s. 17.5 m (58 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern is red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). Jeremy Cline has a sunset photo, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse marks one of the most prominent points on the Bay of Fundy coastline. The original lighthouse burned in January 1898, and its replacement, an octagonal wood tower, also burned after being struck by lightning in December 1958. Located on the grounds of the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station. Site and tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: New Brunswick Power. ARLHS CAN-390; CCG 90; Admiralty H4108; NGA 11160.
* Lighthouse Point (Drews Head, Beaver Harbour) (3)
1984 (station established 1875). Active; focal plane 14.5 m (47 ft); white light, 7 s on, 8 s off. 8 m (28 ft) fiberglass tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. 1-story fog signal building. Fog horn (6 s blast every 60 s). Sibling of Cape Spencer Light (above). Bash's photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo, Jeremy Cline has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was replaced by a skeletal tower in the late 1960s. Located beyond the end of Lighthouse Road, off Main Street in Beaver Harbour; accessible by a walk of about 800 m (1/2 mi) round trip. Limited parking. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-162; CCG 83; Admiralty H4112; NGA 11184.
Beaver Harbour Light
Lighthouse Point Light, Beaver Harbour, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Pea Point (2)
1965 (station established 1878). Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); continuous white light. 10 m (34 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story concrete fog signal building. Fog horn (two 3 s blasts every 60 s). Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo, Kevin Scherer has a 2008 photo, Jeremy Cline has a photo, a view from the sea is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a small island near the Grand Manan Island ferry terminal near Black's Harbour. Although it is possible to walk to the lighthouse at low tide, treacherous footing and rapidly changing tides make this hazardous. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-366; CCG 81; Admiralty H4114; NGA 11192.
Southwest Wolf Island (2)
1982 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); white flash every 10 s. 8 m (28 ft) fiberglass tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Lighthouse Explorer has Stan Severi's aerial photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the southern tip of the island in the Wolf Islands off the mouth of Passamaquoddy Bay. Accessible only by boat; visible distantly from the Grand Manan ferry and from Head Harbour Light on Campobello Island (see below). Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-470; CCG 36; Admiralty H4110; NGA 11172.
Bliss Island (2)
1964 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 15.5 m (51 ft); red flash every 4 s. 12 m (38 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story concrete fog signal building. Karl Agre has a 2012 view from the sea, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the southwest point of the island in the entrance to Bliss Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-045; CCG 77; Admiralty H4118; NGA 11200.
*** L'Etete Passage (Green's Point)
1903 (fog signal station established 1879). Inactive since 1999 (fog signal remains active). 12 m (39 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Fog signal (3 s blast every 30 s). Kelly Anne Loughery's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, another 2008 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. The station guards the passage between Deer Island and the mainland. The keeper's house is now a museum displaying items of lighthouse and local maritime history. The nearby 1-story Coast Guard monitoring station is available for vacation rental. In July 2008, the Coast Guard transferred ownership of the lighthouse to the Green's Point Light Association. Located on the point, a peninsula connected to the mainland by a narrow isthmus near the Deer Island ferry terminal in L'Etete. Site open, museum open daily in the summer, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Greens Point Light Association. ARLHS CAN-214; CCG 71; Admiralty H4120; NGA 11208.
* St. Andrews (Pendlebury)
1833. Inactive since 1938. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern, painted white; lantern roof is red. Google has a closeup street view and a distant satellite view. As of early 2002 this historic and long-abandoned lighthouse was in poor condition, as was the seawall that supported it. The lantern had been removed many years before, and the tower carried a red cap. The lighthouse ranked #1 on the former NBLHS Endangered List. In July 2002 the St. Andrews Civic Trust relocated the tower about 15 m (50 ft) from the seawall so that it could be restored. Eventually the seawall was to be repaired and the restored lighthouse returned to its original location, possibly to be relit. A 2005 closeup photo did not show any change, but a July 2009 photo showed the lighthouse freshly repainted. Jimmy Emerson's July 2010 photo showed work in progress. The restoration was completed with the installation of a replica lantern in October 2011. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the lighthouse, and Wikimedia has a historic photo taken in 1895. Located at the end of Patrick Street in St. Andrews, adjacent to a restaurant. Site open, tower closed. Owner: St. Andrews Civic Trust. Site manager: Town of St. Andrews. ARLHS CAN-714.

L'Etete Passage Light, July 2008
photo copyright Kelly Anne Loughery
used by permission

Deer and Campobello Islands Lighthouses
Note: Deer Island and Campobello Island are substantial islands in the mouth of Passamaquoddy Bay close to the U.S. border. Deer Island is about 13 km (8 mi) long and is accessible by ferries from L'Etete and from Eastport, Maine. Another ferry operates between Deer Island and Campobello Island. Campobello is larger, about 16 km (10 mi) long; it is accessible by the ferry from Deer Island and by bridge from Lubec, Maine.
Leonardville
1914. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); continuous white light. 8 m (28 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on a cliff at the entrance to Leonardville Harbour, on the east side of Deer Island. Site and tower closed (private property) but the lighthouse can be seen from NB 772 through trees. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-274; CCG 46; Admiralty H4146; NGA 11264.
* Head Harbour (East Quoddy Head)
1829. Active; focal plane 17.5 m (58 ft); continuous red light. 15.5 m (51 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, connected to a keeper's house by a covered walkway. Fog signal building (1914) and other light station buildings. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). Lighthouse painted white with one red vertical stripe and one red horizontal band forming the pattern of St. George's Cross, the symbol of England. Pauline Rosenberg's photo appears at the top of this page, Anderson has an excellent page with several photos, the friends group has a huge portfolio of photos on Flickr.com, a fine 2008 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a distant satellite view. This is New Brunswick's oldest lighthouse, one of Canada's best known and most photographed lighthouses, and one of the few light stations in the province that has all its original structures. The Friends of Head Harbour Lightstation are working to improve access and restore the buildings. In 2006 the Friends painted the entire light station. Photos of their current activities are usually available. Located on a rocky islet off the northernmost point of Campobello Island, which is accessible by bridge from Lubec, Maine. Site open; access to the light station is by a narrow sandbar covered by water at high tide, so care is required. Tower closed. Owner/site manager: Friends of Head Harbour Lightstation. ARLHS CAN-166; CCG 44; Admiralty H4154; NGA 11332.
* Mulholland Point
1885. Inactive since 1963. 13.5 m (44 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. A photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has Jeremy D'Entremont's photo, Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse is well maintained by the Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission. Picnic area adjacent to the tower. Located on the west side of Campobello Island about 400 m (1/4 mi) north of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Bridge, which connects the island to Lubec, Maine. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Roosevelt Campobello International Park. ARLHS CAN-326.
Mulholland Point Light
Mulholland Point Light, Campobello Island, May 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by hatchski

Grand Manan Island Area Lighthouses
Note: Grand Manan Island is larger than either Deer or Campobello. About 30 km (19 mi) long, it lies in the Bay of Fundy about 12 km (7.5 mi) southeast of West Quoddy Head, Maine. The island is accessible year-round by ferry from Blacks Harbour.
* Long Eddy Point (Whistle)
1966 (fog signal station established 1871). Active; focal plane 38.5 m (126 ft); red flash every 8 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story concrete fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view of the station. The fog signal station was known for generations as "The Whistle," so the lighthouse is sometimes called the Whistle Light. Located at the northern tip of Grand Manan Island. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-283; CCG 34; Admiralty H4166; NGA 11360.
* Swallowtail
1860. Active; focal plane 37 m (122 ft); white light, 4 s on, 2 s off. 16 m (53 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (2 s blast every 20 s). The keeper's house, restored by a movie production company in 1996, operated for several years as a bed and breakfast inn, but it is no longer in use. A photo is at right, Wikimedia has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a distant satellite view. This historic light, fifth oldest in New Brunswick, has been in need of restoration. In fall 2004 the lighthouse was painted by the Grand Manan Rotary Club and other volunteers. The building looked fine in a photo taken after the painting, but a 2006 photo shows how quickly the paint weathers. The building was painted again in summer 2006, as we see at right. In March 2008, the village of Grand Manan briefly put the keeper's house up for sale, but after public outcry the sale was cancelled. In 2013, grants from the provincial government helped fund site improvements, including a new boardwalk. The ferry from Blacks Harbour passes the lighthouse on arriving. The name "Swallowtail" comes from the lighthouse's location on the more northern of two sharp points. Located off Old Airport Road at the end of a rocky peninsula north of North Head; accessible by a short hike. Parking provided. Site open, keeper's house open to guests June through October, tower closed. Owner (tower only): Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Village of Grand Manan. ARLHS CAN-491; CCG 33; Admiralty H4168; NGA 11364.
Great Duck Island
1966 (fog signal station established 1886). Active; focal plane 15 m (50 ft); white flash every 10 s. Approx. 11 m (35 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The tower was formerly at one corner of a 1-story fog signal building, but recent photos show that this building has been demolished, leaving only the foundation pad. Note: there are also Great Duck Island lighthouses in Ontario and in Maine. Located at the south end of the island off the east coast of Grand Manan Island near Woodward's Cove. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-210; CCG 29; Admiralty H4174; NGA 11384.
Grand Harbour (Ross Island)
1879. Inactive since 1963. Square pyramidal wood tower attached to 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. Gravely endangered. The abandoned lighthouse is collapsing in ruins. Once called "the most endangered lighthouse in North America," it has become a lost cause. "Saving" it now would mean practically rebuilding it from scratch. Hans Raffelt has an August 2006 photo, and Marinas.com has aerial photos. A June 2008 photo and Roger Lewis's July 2011 photo show the lighthouse still standing, but barely. Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a very distant satellite view. Located on Ross Island, accessible from Grand Harbour, Grand Manan Island, at low tide. However, the island is privately owned and the lighthouse is too dangerous to enter if indeed it is still standing. Site closed. owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-709.
Swallowtail Light
Swallowtail Light, Grand Manan, August 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Harrogate
* Long Point
1966 (fog signal station established 1929). Active; focal plane 15.5 m (51 ft); white light, 6 s on, 6 s off. 11 m (37 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (2 s blast every 20 s). A foggy photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on the southern end of White Head Island southeast of Grand Manan Island; accessible by ferry from Grand Manan. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-644; CCG 25; Admiralty H4178; NGA 11400.
Gannet Rock
1831 (John Purvis). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white flash every 6 s. 23 m (75 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower attached to 2-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted with black and white vertical stripes; lantern is red. Fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). The lantern is modern (1967). A 2nd order Fresnel lens and a DCB aerobeacon formerly used in the lighthouse are on display at the Grand Manan Museum in Grand Harbour. Kelly Anne Loughery contributed the photo at right, Karl Agre's photo is at right, René Lortie has a good view from the sea, Lighthouse Digest has an account of life on the rock by the daughter of a former keeper, Marinas.com has fine aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has an indistinct satellite view of the reef. Staffed until 1996, this historic lighthouse deteriorated sadly after it was automated. The Coast Guard carried out a restoration is 2003, but since then the lighthouse has fallen back into poor condition. Located on a bare, half-acre island about 10 km (6 mi) southeast of Southwest Head. Accessible only by boat in very dangerous seas; landing on the island is difficult. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-192; Admiralty H4188; CCG 8; NGA 11416.
* Southwest Head (2)
1959 (station established 1880). Active; focal plane 48 m (157 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Fog horn (6 s blast every 60 s). A tall communications tower nearby dwarfs the lighthouse. A foggy closeup is available, Jake Wellington has a distant view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of NB 776 and at the brink of a vertical cliff on the southwestern point of Grand Manan Island. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-469; CCG 11; Admiralty H4186; NGA 11436.
Gannet Rock Light
Gannet Rock Light, Bay of Fundy, September 2012
Flickr photo copyright Dr. Karl Agre; permission requested
Machias Seal Island (2)
1915 (station established 1832). Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 3 s. 18 m (60 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Fog horn (two 3 s blasts every 60 s). Two 1-story Coast Guard buildings (1950s) with red roofs. Lighthouse Explorer has a good photo by Jeremy D'Entremont, Ed Karjala has posted a closeup photo, and Google has a distant satellite view. Machias Seal Island is a small (7 ha; 15 acre) island about 19 km (12 mi) southwest of Grand Manan Island and 12 km (7.5 mi) southeast of Cutler, Maine. The island is claimed by both the U.S. and Canada. This dispute is more than 200 years old and is quite amicable on the whole, but to assert Canadian sovereignty the Coast Guard staffs this station year round, with rotating crews serving for four weeks each. The station and lighthouse are powered by a large array of solar panels. The island is also an important bird nesting area and both countries recognize it as a wildlife preserve. Located on the highest point of the island. Accessible only by boat; ecotours are available from Seal Cove on Grand Manan and from Cutler and Jonesport, Maine. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-292; CCG 6; Admiralty H4192; NGA 11444.

St. John River Lighthouses

Note: The Saint John River is navigable for small craft between Saint John and Fredericton, the capital of New Brunswick. The river was formerly marked by a least two dozen small lighthouses. About half of them survive, and only half of those remain active. Most of these lighthouses are poorly known and several are endangered.
Kings County Lighthouses
* Renforth
1980s. Active (privately maintained and unofficial); continuous white light. 6 m (20 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern painted red. Anderson has photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The lighthouse was built in a small community park near the Renforth Boat Club. Located off Rothesay Road in Renforth, on the east side of the Kennebecasis River (the eastern branch of the Saint John estuary). Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: uncertain.
* McColgan Point
1914. Active; focal plane 12 m (37 ft); white light, 2 s on 10 s off. 8 m (27 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern roof is red. Bing has a satellite view. Located on the north side of the Milkish Channel, on the Kingston Peninsula, at the Kennebecasis Island ferry wharf. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-309; CCG 119.
* Bayswater
1914. Inactive since 2005. 8 m (27 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern roof is red. A closeup photo is available, Google has a 2013 street view, and Bing has a satellite view. A twin of the McColgan Point Light. Discontinued in November 2005, the abandoned lighthouse is probably endangered. Located on the Kingston Peninsula, beside NB 845. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-025; ex-CCG 120.
* Sand Point
1869. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); continuous red light. 17.5 m (58 ft) square pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with enclosed watch room, lantern and gallery. Skeletal portion painted red, watch room and lantern white, lantern roof red. Like the Swift Point Light (above), this is a leading light; ships bound upstream from Saint John steer directly towards it to find the channel to the upper river. Lighthouse Explorer has Kelly Anne Loughery's photo, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. This lighthouse was renovated in 1991 but probably needs further attention. Located at the end of Sand Point Wharf Road, between Bayswater and Carter Point. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-445; CCG 121.
Belyeas Point (2)
1930s (station established 1898). Active; focal plane 14 m (45 ft); green flash every 5 s. 11 m (37 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. Doan has a page with photos, 2012 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse was rebuilt and slightly relocated following severe floods in the 1930s. Located on the west side of the river at the lower end of the Long Reach, about 3 km (2 mi) north of Westfield. Accessible only by boat, but easily visible from a nearby residential neighborhood. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-031; CCG 122.
The Cedars
1904. Inactive since 1994. 10 m (32 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. There's a web page for the lighthouse, Doan has a page with photos, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. In 2006, ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to a local heritage society. In 2008, a walking path was completed, making the lighthouse accessible to the public for the first time. Located on the east side of the Long Reach of the river, off NB 845 in Long Reach, about 10 miles north of the Hardings Point ferry. Accessible by a hiking trail from NB 845 in Long Reach, across the road from the Frances Smith Memorial Hall. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Kingston Peninsula Heritage. ARLHS CAN-124.
* Oak Point (2)
1902 (station established 1869). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); green light, 2 s on, 8 s off. 14.5 m (48 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on four short concrete pillars. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. A photo by Corey Ann Balazowich is at right, Doan has a page with photos, Lighthouse Explorer has Kelly Anne Loughery's photo, Greg Hickman has a good view from the river, and Bing has a satellite view. Formerly modified for use as a gift shop, this lighthouse has been returned to its historic appearance. Located at the tip of Oak Point, on the west side of the Long Reach of the river off NB 102, adjacent to the campground of the Oak Point Provincial Park. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Oak Point Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-358; CCG 125.
 

Oak Point Light
Oak Point Light, Greenwich, October 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Corey Ann Balazowich


Queens County Lighthouses
* Hampstead
1900. Inactive since 1994. 5.5 m (18 ft) square cylindrical tower with lantern. Doan has a page with photos, a 2012 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. One of the smallest Canadian lighthouses, this abandoned tower was relocated to higher ground in 1999 near the ferry wharf in Hampstead, on the west side of the river just off NB 102. Previously endangered, as the Saint John River Society assumed management of the wharf but initially declined to take responsibility for the lighthouse. However, the society accepted ownership in 2009, and a 2010 photo shows the lighthouse restored and in fine condition. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Saint John River Society. ARLHS CAN-221.
Lower Musquash Island (2)
1924 (station established 1875). Inactive since 1994. 12 m (37 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. Bing has a satellite view. After deactivation, the lighthouse was given to the owner of the pasture in which it stands. Located near Lower Cambridge on an island in the entrance to Washademoak Lake, which is not a lake but a northeastward branch of the Saint John estuary. Accessible only by boat or a walk of about 2 km (1.25 mi) round trip. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-333.
* Hendry Farm (2)
1896 (station established 1869). Inactive since 1995. 8 m (27 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. Bing has a satellite view. In September 2005, ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to the Village of Cambridge-Narrows. Located on the west side of Washademoak Lake off NB 715 near Cambridge Narrows. Accessible by a short walk. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Village of Cambridge-Narrows. ARLHS CAN-520.
* Gagetown (3?)
1958 (station established 1895). Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); continuous green light. 10 m (32 ft) square cylindrical watch room and lantern mounted on a square pyramidal wood skeletal tower. Tower painted white, lantern and gallery red. A photo by Corey Ann Balazowich is at right, Doan has a page with photos, Gillian Barfoot has a 2009 closeup, and Bing has a satellite view. Several lights on this site have been destroyed by ice during spring thaws. Located at the Gagetown ferry, on the west side of the river just off NB 102. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-190; CCG 135.
Gagetown Light
Gagetown Light, Gagetown, October 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Corey Ann Balazowich
* [Robertson Point (2)]
Date unknown (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 12 m (40 ft); continuous red light. 7.5 m (25 ft) white cylindrical fiberglass tower. Bing has a satellite view. This modern aid replaced a square pyramidal wood tower. Located at White's Cove on Grand Lake. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-432; CCG 137.

Sunbury County Lighthouse
* Wilmot Bluff
1869. Inactive since 1969. 13 m (42 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern roof is red. Doan has a page with photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on Thatch Road off NB 102 near the Fredericton airport. Site open, tower closed; the light is on private property but stands next to the road. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-734.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Cap Enragé Light
Cap Enragé Light, Alma, July 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Nominoe66

Notable faux lighthouses:

  • Lighthouse on the Green (1989?), Fredericton, is a faux lighthouse including a small museum, take out restaurant, and ice cream shop. It is a popular attraction for residents and toursists, but it is not a working lighthouse. It is open for climbing daily late June through mid September. Google has a street view and a satellite view.
  • Gagetown Village (date unknown), located at the village wharf, is distinct from the historic Gagetown lighthouse. It does not appear to have a working light. Google has a street view, but the small tower is not seen in Google's satellite view.
  • St. John Market Square has a faux lighthouse; it probably displays a decorative light but is not an aid to navigation. Google has a good street view but only a fuzzy satellite view.
  • St. Stephen, on the St. Croix River, is not an active aid to navigation. Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view.

Adjoining pages: North: Northern New Brunswick | East: Western Nova Scotia | South: Eastern Maine

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Posted September 8, 2003; checked and revised July 11, 2014. Lighthouses: 42. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.