Lighthouses of Canada: Northern New Brunswick

The Canadian province of New Brunswick has two coastlines. The northern coast faces northeast on the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Northumberland Strait, while the southern coast faces southeast on the Bay of Fundy. The two coasts are separated by a narrow isthmus that joins New Brunswick to Nova Scotia. This page lists the lighthouses of the northern coast.

New Brunswick once had well over 100 lighthouses, but modern deactivations have left it with fewer than 50 working towers. A number of the decommissioned lights survive, some of them relocated to new homes. One, the Woody Point Light, was relocated to Nova Scotia.

Sadly, the province's lighthouse preservation society has disbanded. Local preservation efforts are strong in many communities, but there are a number of lighthouses much in need of restoration.

Aids to navigation in Canada are maintained by the Canadian Coast Guard. In 2008, Parliament passed the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to designate and protect historic lighthouses. In 2010, the Coast Guard declared the great majority of lighthouses to be surplus, and there is fear that this may lead to the disposal and possible destruction of many lighthouses.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. CCG numbers are from the Atlantic Coast volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Admiralty numbers are from Volume H of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 110.

General Sources
New Brunswick Canada Lighthouses
Excellent photos with historical and visitor information, from Kraig Anderson's LighthouseFriends.com web site.
Lighthouses in New Brunswick, Canada
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
New Brunswick
Nine 2008 photos by C.W. Bash.
Lighthouses in New Brunswick
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Leuchttürme Kanadas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.

Campbellton Range Rear Light
Campbellton Range Rear Light, Campbellton, September 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Cynthia Zullo

Restigouche County (Upper Chaleur Bay) Lighthouses
Note: Chaleur Bay is a long arm of the Gulf of St. Lawrence separating New Brunswick from the Gaspé Peninsula of Québec. The bay is 30-50 km (19-27 mi) wide for much of its length.
* Campbellton Range Rear (4)
1985 (station established 1879). Active; focal plane 18 m (58 ft); continuous yellow light visible only on the range line. 15.5 m (51 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery (1985) surrounding a square steel skeletal tower (1978), attached to a 1-1/2 story wood youth hostel (1985). Lighthouse painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line; youth hostel also painted white with red trim. Cynthia Zullo's photo is above, Bash has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This is an interesting example of converting a lighthouse to a new use: the existing skeletal tower was incorporated into the new lighthouse. The front light is on a small skeletal tower. Located on the Restigouche River on Campbellton's waterfront near the Van Horn bridge linking New Brunswick and Quebec. Site open, parking available, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Campbellton Lighthouse Hostel. ARLHS CAN-070; CCG 1352; Admiralty H1632; NGA 7128.
* Inch Arran Point Range Front (Inch Arran, Bon Ami Point)
1870. Active; focal plane 14 m (45 ft); white flight, 3 s on, 3 s off, visible only on the range line. 11 m (36 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe of the range line. Formerly independent, this lighthouse was incorporated as the front range light in 1972. The lantern is enclosed in an unusual "birdcage" of iron bars. A photo is at right, Monica de Moss has a fine 2008 photo, Terri Winchester has a closeup, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a distant satellite view. This light station marks the northernmost point of New Brunswick. The rear light is on a 10 m (33 ft) skeletal tower 365 m (1/4 mi) to the west. Located at Inch Arran Park in downtown Dalhousie, near the mouth of the Restigouche River. In June 2008, the town council voted to start an effort to secure ownership and restoration of the lighthouse. Parking provided. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Town of Dalhousie. ARLHS CAN-246; CCG 1343; Admiralty H1616; NGA 7164.
* Dalhousie Deep Water Wharf (relocated to Charlo)
1879. Inactive since 1960 at least. Approx. 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with red trim. Bing has a very indistinct satellite view. In 1960, John Audet purchased the light and relocated it to stand beside his residence in Charlo. According to Anderson, Audet plans to donate the lighthouse eventually to the town of Charlo. Located 15 km (9 mi) east of Dalhousie on NB 134. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse is easy to see from the road. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-724.
#Belledune Point (3) (relocated to Seaside)
1972 (station established 1884). Inactive since 2002. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Lighthouse Explorer has Virginia Slechta's photo of the lighthouse on station in 2000. Charles Stewart purchased the lighthouse in 2002 and relocated it in three sections from Belledune Point to his property in Seaside, about 25 km (15 mi) northwest on Chaleur Bay. His plans then were to reassemble and relight the tower. However, in 2009 Kelly Anne Loughery found two of the three sections in the woods and reported that "it looks like what's left of the lighthouse is just going to rot where it sits." Site closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-705.
Inch Arran Light
Inch Arran Point Range Front Light, Dalhousie, June 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Floizm


Gloucester County Lighthouses
* Pointe à Brideau Range Rear (Caraquet)
1978. Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); continuous white light. 13 m (43 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a vertical red stripe on the range line. Anderson has good photos, P.J. Boudreau has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. In 1991 the city of Caraquet added siding to an existing skeletal tower to make this lighthouse the centerpiece of a town park. Located in Caraquet, behind the Place Caraquet shopping center off NB 11. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Town of Caraquet. ARLHS CAN-895; CCG 1319.3; Admiralty H1585.1; NGA 7306.
* Caraquet Range Front
1903. Active; focal plane 8 m (27 ft); continuous yellow light. 8 m (27 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located off NB 145 about 3 km (2 mi) east of Middle Caraquet. Site and tower closed (private property) but the lighthouse is easy to see both from the road and from the beach. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-116; CCG 1310; Admiralty H1580; NGA 7276.
Île de Caraquet (Caraquet Island) (2)
1950s (station established 1870). Active; focal plane 22 m (72 ft); white flash every 4 s. 20 m (66 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. The upper part of the lighthouse carries a slatted daymark painted white; lantern painted red. Wikimedia has a distant view, and Google has a very distant satellite view. Located at the western end of the island, which shelters the approach to Caraquet. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-893; CCG 1322; Admiralty H1588; NGA 7272.
* Caraquet Range Rear (relocated to Bas-Caraquet)
1903. Inactive since 2000. 12.5 m (41 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. When the light was replaced by an 11 m (37 ft) skeletal tower in 2000, the lighthouse was relocated to the municipal park in Bas-Caraquet. A covered patio for picnic tables was constructed on the side of the lighthouse facing Chaleur Bay. Located in Bas-Caraquet Municipal Park off NB 145 at the end of the Rue Lanteigne. Owner/site manager: Village de Bas-Caraquet. ARLHS CAN-707; ex-Admiralty H1580.1.
* Black Point
1967. Active; focal plane 18 m (58 ft); yellow light, 4 s on, 2 s off, 2 s on, 2 s off. 16.5 m (54 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with enclosed square central cylinder, lantern, and gallery. 4th order drum-style Fresnel lens in use. Lighthouse painted with broad red and white horizontal bands. Michel Forand's photo is at right, Anderson has fine photos, and Google has a distant satellite view. Lighthouses of this design are more common on the Great Lakes. Located at the northern end of Lamèque Island off NB 113, marking the western entrance to Miscou Harbour. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-041; CCG 1275; Admiralty H1556; NGA 7360.
Black Point Light
Black Point Light, Miscou
photo copyright Michel Forand; used by permission
*** Miscou Island
1856. Active; focal plane 24.5 m (80 ft); two white flashes every 7.5 s. 25.5 m (83 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. A rotating 3rd order Fresnel lens (1910) remains in use. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). The keeper's house and barn were removed from the site after automation of the light in 1988, but the barn was returned in 2002. Chris Budd's photo is at right, Rod Blanchard also has a closeup photo, Wikimedia has numerous photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This historic lighthouse was built by the Colony of New Brunswick prior to confederation. The lighthouse was extended in height by 1.8 m (6 ft) in 1903. The site was improved in 2000; a nature trail and visitor facilities were added and the approach road and parking areas were paved. In June 2001 the tower was closed to visitors due to mercury contamination. During 2003 there were several efforts to clean up the problem, but they failed to reduce the mercury concentration to a safe level. The mercury was finally cleaned up in 2008. In 2009, the provincial government was building visitor facilities, including a parking lot, and it was hoped that the lighthouse would open to the public before the end of the season. It was open for the season in 2010. Located at the end of NB 113 on Birch Point at the northern end of Miscou Island, guarding the entrance to Chaleur Bay. Site open, tower open in the summer season. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Développement Touristique de Miscou, Inc. ARLHS CAN-320; CCG 1264.7; Admiralty H1552; NGA 7368.
Big Shippagan
1872. Active; focal plane 16.5 m (54 ft); yellow flash every 5 s. 16.5 m (54 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Simon Narramore has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Big has a satellite view. Located at the end of Domitien Lane in Chiasson, Lamèque Island, marking the entrance to Shippagan Harbour. The island is accessible by bridge from Shippagan on NB 113; the road to the lighthouse may not be passable without 4WD. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-035; CCG 1254; Admiralty H1530; NGA 7392.
*** Portage Island Range Rear (2) (relocated to Shippagan)
1908 (station established 1869). Inactive since 1986. 13 m (42 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Mark Blevis's photo is at the bottom of this page, Panil Brune has a good photo, Wikimedia has a photo, and Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Originally located on Portage Island in Miramichi Bay, the lighthouse was relocated in 1986 to Shippagan as one of the exhibits at the Aquarium and Marine Center. Located near the Shippagan Marina and the University of Monckton's Shippagan campus in Shippagan. Site open, museum and tower open daily mid May to late September. Owner: New Brunswick Department of Tourism and Parks. Site manager: New Brunswick Aquarium and Marine Centre. ARLHS CAN-733; ex-Admiralty H1444.1.
Miscou Island Light
Miscou Island Light, July 2009
Flickr photo copyright Chris Budd; used by permission

Northumberland County (Miramichi Bay) Lighthouses

Note: Miramichi Bay is a shallow, funnel-shaped estuary separated from the Gulf of St. Lawrence by barrier islands.
* Lower Neguac Wharf Range Rear (2)
1892 station established 1873). Inactive since 2003. 8 m (28 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line; lantern is red. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a distant satellite view. The lighthouse was decommissioned at the end of the 2003 season. Located off NB 11 in Lower Neguac, near the northern entrance to Miramichi Bay. Site and tower closed (private property), but the lighthouse can be seen easily from the beach. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard (?). Site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-289; ex-Admiralty H1518.1.
* Grand Dune Flats Range Front (relocated to Burnt Church)
1916. Inactive since the 1950s. 12 m (39 ft) square wood lantern and gallery centered on the roof of a 2-story wood keeper's house. Kelly Anne Loughery's photo is at right, and Bing has a satellite view. After deactivation the lighthouse was relocated to Burnt Church, where it serves as a private residence. It has been altered by a modern addition. In the Lighthouse Digest issue for January 2003, Loughery reports how she and other members of the former New Brunswick Lighthouse Society rediscovered this forgotten lighthouse in August 2002; it is the only example of this design surviving in the province. Located on Bayview Drive a short distance east of Church River Road in Burnt Church. Site and tower closed (private property). Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-726.

Grand Dune Flats Range Front Light, Burnt Church, June 2009
photo copyright Kelly Anne Loughery; used by permission
Grants Beach Range Rear (2) (relocated to Oak Point)
1903 (station established 1869). Inactive since 1972 at least. 12 m (37 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Bing has an indistinct satellite view. Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo of the lighthouse at its original location at Grants Beach. Around 2007 the lighthouse was sold and relocated 8 km (5 mi) to the east to Oak Point. The present owners intended to repaint and refurbish their acquisition in 2009. Site and tower closed (private property), but the lighthouse can be seen
Grants Beach Range Front (2)
1903 (station established 1869). Inactive since 1972 at least. 12 m (37 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. After the lighthouse was sold in 1972, it was relocated a short distance to its present location. Located near #360 NB 11 at Lower Newcastle. Site and tower closed (private property), but the lighthouse can be seen from a distance. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-727.
* Oak Point Range Front (2) (relocated to Miramichi)
1904 (station established 1869). Inactive since the mid 1960s. 10 m (33 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Originally located at Oak Point on the north shore of Miramichi Bay, this lighthouse has been relocated about 20 km (13 mi) southwest to Millbank, on the northeast side of Miramichi. The original lantern has been replaced by a square observation room. Lighthouse Explorer has a photo by Michel Forand, Wikimedia has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the north side of the Miramichi estuary about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) northeast of the Centennial Bridge. Site and tower closed (private property), but the lighthouse can be seen from NB 11. ARLHS CAN-732.
* Point Escuminac (4)
1963 (station established 1841). Active; focal plane 20.5 m (68 ft); three white flashes every 20 s. 18 m (60 ft) "apple-core" hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with flared top supporting the gallery and lantern. Tower is white, lantern and gallery red. Fog horn (two 3 s blasts every 60 s). 1-story fog signal building. A photo is at right, Marc Guitard has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. This is the oldest light station on the northern coast of the province, marking the entrances to Miramachi Bay to the north and Northumberland Strait to the south. The original lighthouse was an 18 m (59 ft) octagonal wood tower; it survived until it was demolished in 1966. Located beyond the end of NB 117 at the end of a dirt road; accessible by auto in good weather. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-389; CCG 1163; Admiralty H1424; NGA 7580.

Kent County (Northern Northumberland Strait) Lighthouses
Note: Northumberland Strait is a narrow passage separating Prince Edward Island from the mainland provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The strait is 15-30 km (9-19 mi) wide for much of its length.
* Pointe Sapin Range Rear (2)
1910 (station established 1903). Active; focal plane 11 m (37 ft); continuous yellow light. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line. Lighthouse Explorer has a photo by Michel Forand, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The front light is on a short skeletal tower. Located beside NB 117 in Pointe Sapin. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-401; CCG 1161; Admiralty H1418.1; NGA 7596.
Point Escuminac Light
Point Escuminac Light, Escuminac, July 2007
Wikipedia Creative Commons photo by Lesfreck
* Richibucto Head (Cap Lumière) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1865). Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); white flash every 5 s. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. The keeper's house, formerly attached, was removed in the 1960s. Lighthouse Explorer has a photo by Michel Forand, C.W. Bash has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the end of a road off NB 505 in Cap Lumière. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-430; CCG 1128; Admiralty H1376; NGA 7660.
* Pointe à Jérôme Range Front (2)
About 1916 (station established 1883). Active; focal plane 6 m (19 ft); continuous white light. 4 m (14 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with a broad red vertical stripe on the range line. No lantern; the light is shown through a window at the top of the tower. The tiny tower is inconspicuous in Bing's satellite view. Located off NB 475 about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) north of Bouctouche. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-729; CCG 1124; Admiralty H1368; NGA 7692.
* Pointe à Jérôme Range Rear (2)
About 1916 (station established 1883). Active; focal plane 17 m (57 ft); continuous white light. 13 m (44 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with gallery, lantern and enclosed watch room, painted white with a broad red vertical stripe on the range line. The stripe is continued across a slatted white daymark covering the lower portion of the front of the tower. Bing has an indistinct satellite view. Located off NB 475 about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) north of Bouctouche. Site and tower closed (private property) but the light is easily seen from the road. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-730; CCG 1125; Admiralty H1368.1; NGA 7696.
Bouctouche Bar (Bouctouche Dune) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white flash every 4 s. 8 m (27 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with red trim. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Bouctouche Bar is a long barrier sand spit, now protected as a nature park, sheltering the bay of Bouctouche. Located at the end of the spit; accessible by boat or by a long hike, about 10 miles round trip. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Irving Eco-Centre (Dune de Bouctouche). ARLHS CAN-055; CCG 1122; Admiralty H1362; NGA 7680.
* Dixon Point Range Rear (2)
1919 (station established 1881). Inactive. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Bing has a satellite view. Endangered: this abandoned lighthouse is in poor condition and is deteriorating quickly. In 2009, Kelly Anne Loughery reported that the building was sold to André Maille, the adjoining landowner for $1. The new owner has done nothing to repair the tower, and Anderson reports that he is willing to sell the lighthouse to anyone with a plan to restore it. Located on NB 535 at Saint Thomas. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-161; ex-Admiralty H1369.1.
* Dixon Point (Dixon Point Range Front) (2)
1919 (station established 1881). Active; focal plane 10 m (34 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Dennis Jarvis's photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has a photo by John Jacquemain, and Bing has a satellite view. Although the range has been discontinued, this front light remains in service. Located on NB 535 at Saint Thomas, about 175 m (600 ft) southeast of the front light. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-708; CCG 1120; Admiralty H1369; NGA 7686.
Dixon Point Range Front Light
Dixon Point Light, St. Thomas, June 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
* Cocagne Range Front
1907. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); continuous yellow light. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a broad vertical red stripe on the range line; lantern is red. The rear range light is on a skeletal tower. C.W. Bash's photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has a photo by Michel Forand, another photo is available, Marinas.com has good aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The rear light, originally on a pole, is now on a 13 m (43 ft) skeletal tower. Located at the south end of the bridge over the Cocagne River on NB 134 in Cocagne. Site and tower closed (private property) but the light is easily seen from the road. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-141; CCG 1116; Admiralty H1354; NGA 7708.
* Caissie Point (Cap des Caissie)
1872. Active; focal plane 14 m (47 ft); yellow light, 2 s on, 2 s off, 2 s on, 6 s off. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of a side road off NB 530 north of Shediac. Site and tower closed (private property) but the light is easily seen from nearby. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-743; CCG 1113; Admiralty H1350; NGA 7724.
* Grande Digue
1912. Inactive since the 1950s. 6 m (20 ft) wood mast attached to the rear of 1-story shingle-covered wood equipment shelter. The Grande Digue Société Historique has a photo (next to last photo on the page), but the tiny structure is hard to see in Google's satellite view. This little light was built on the village wharf in Grande Digue. The light was lit and raised, like a flag on a flagpole, every evening. There were many similar lights in Canadian fishing villages, but this is the only known survivor. After deactivation it was moved to Hervé Richard, where it was used for storage of fishing gear. In 2006 it was recognized as a historic structure and donated to the Musée des Pionniers in Grande Digue. Located at the museum, on highway 530 in Grand Digue. Site open; museum and lighthouse open daily in July and August. Owner/site manager: Grande Digue Société Historique.
Cocagne Range Front Light
Cocagne Range Front Light, Cocagne, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo copyright C.W. Bash

Westmorland County (Cape Tormentine Area) Lighthouses
* Pointe du Chêne Range Front (2)
1898 (station established 1895). Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); continuous red light. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a broad vertical red stripe on the range line; lantern is red. Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. The history of these range lights is obscure; they may have been rebuilt in 1960. The lighthouse was relocated farther from the beach in 1990. Located in Parlee Beach Provincial Park, off exit 37 of NB 15 east of Shediac. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Parlee Beach Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-397; CCG 1107; Admiralty H1328; NGA 7736.
* Pointe du Chêne Range Rear (2)
1898 (station established 1895). Active; focal plane 13.5 m (45 ft); continuous red light. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, raised on pilings, painted white with red trim and a broad vertical red stripe on the range line; lantern is red. Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Located in Parlee Beach Provincial Park, off exit 37 of NB 15 east of Shediac. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Parlee Beach Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-713; CCG 1108; Admiralty H1328.1; NGA 7740.
* Cape Jourimain
1870. Inactive since 1997. 16 m (53 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Dennis Jarvis's photo is at right, Roberto Gauvin has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Gravely endangered. This historic lighthouse was deactivated in 1997 when the Confederation Bridge, linking New Brunswick to Prince Edward Island, was completed. After being abandoned by the Coast Guard, the lighthouse began to deteriorate. The nearby nature center has launched a drive for funds needed to repair and repaint the tower, and in 2009 it was negotiating with Fisheries and Oceans to obtain ownership. By early 2011 these efforts had not yet succeeded, but the center was proceeding to develop a restoration plan. The lighthouse is threatened by erosion and will have to be relocated as part of the plan; engineers have been hired to determine if this move is feasible. The Canadian Lightkeepers Association has a report on these efforts in July 2011. The center has historical exhibits and visitor facilities. Located at the last exit in New Brunswick before the bridge. Accessible by a 1.8 km (1.1 mi) trail (entry fee). Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Cape Jourimain Nature Centre. ARLHS CAN-706; ex-Admiralty H1318.
Cape Jourimain Light
Cape Jourimain Light (Confederation Bridge in the background), August 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
Cape Tormentine Outer Wharf (Range Front) (3)
1940s (station established 1901). Reactivated (inactive 1997-98); focal plane 12 m (39 ft); red light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 11 m (33 ft) square tower with lantern and gallery and with an unusual and attractive pepperpot shape, cylindrical at the base and strongly tapered above. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. Dennid Jarvis's photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has Dana Rushton's photo, Alan Culley has a 2007 photo, Shane MacClure has 1997 photo, Wikipedia has a winter photo by Gordon Robertson, and Bing has a satellite view. The range was discontinued when the Confederation Bridge was opened in 1997, but the front light was reactivated the following year at the request of local fishermen. In 2004 a peatmoss company leased the wharf and fenced it so that there was no longer public access to the lighthouse; access has been restored more recently. The Cape Tormentine Community Development Corporation is seeking ownership of the lighthouse. Located at the end of the former Cape Tormentine ferry wharf, which was made obsolete by the bridge. Accessible by walking the pier. Site and tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS CAN-112; CCG 1090; Admiralty H1308; NGA 7824.
* Cape Tormentine Outer Wharf Range Rear (2)
1907 (station established 1901). Inactive since 1997. 12.5 m (40 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, raised on pilings, painted white with red trim and a broad vertical red stripe on the range line; lantern is red. Sibling of Pointe du Chêne Range Rear. Lighthouse Explorer has Dana Rushton's photo, a 2008 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Endangered: abandoned with the end of the ferry service in 1997, this lighthouse is deteriorating rapidly. The Cape Tormentine Community Development Corporation is seeking to take over ownership or management of these range lights. Located on Old Ferry Road near the base of the former ferry pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard (?). Site manager: uncertain. ARLHS CAN-904; ex-Admiralty H1308.1.
Cape Tormentine Outer Wharf Light
Cape Tormentine Outer Wharf Light, August 2010
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Dennis Jarvis
* Indian Point (Cape Tormentine Entrance) Range Front
1955. Inactive since 1998. 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with a broad vertical red stripe on the range line. No lantern; the light was shown through a square window. Endangered: abandoned and in very poor condition. Lighthouse Explorer has Dana Rushton's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the end of a dirt road off NB 960 about a mile south of Cape Tormentine. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: uncertain. ARLHS CAN-249; ex-Admiralty H1306.
* Indian Point (Cape Tormentine Entrance) Range Rear
1955. Inactive since 1998. 12 m (38 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a broad vertical red stripe on the range line. Endangered: abandoned and in very poor condition. Lighthouse Explorer has Dana Rushton's photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Located off NB 960 near Vista Drive about a mile south of Cape Tormentine. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-250; ex-Admiralty H1306.1.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Portage Island Light
Portage Island Range Rear Light at Shippagan, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Mark Blevis

Notable faux lighthouses:

  • Grand Anse (early 1990s), on Chaleur Bay, is not an accurate representation of a historic light. Wikimedia has a photo, and Google has a satellite view.
  • Le Pays de la Sagouine (date unknown), in the replica Acadian village of the same name at Bouctouche, is a good replica and may be active, but it is not an aid to navigation. Another photo is available, and Google has a satellite view.
  • Pointe du Chêne Pier (date unknown), in Shediac, has a modern lighthouse that displays a continuous white light, but it is not recognized as an aid to navigation. Google has a distant satellite view.
  • Ritchie Wharf (date unknown) in Miramichi is located on the Miramachi River and is an accurate lighthouse replica; it has a continuous white light but is not a recognized aid to navigation. Keith Watson has a photo, and Google has a satellite view.
  • Tracadie (1980s) has a lighthouse as its visitor center; it has never been a working lighthouse. Graham Hobster has a photo, but Google has only a very fuzzy satellite view of the area.

Adjoining pages: North: Eastern Québec | Northeast: Western Prince Edward Island | East: Northwestern Nova Scotia | South: Southern New Brunswick

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index | Ratings key

Posted September 8, 2003; checked and revised May 9, 2013. Lighthouses: 35. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.