Lighthouses of Canada: Southeastern Newfoundland

This page lists lighthouses of the deeply-dissected southeastern corner of Newfoundland: the Bonavista, Bay de Verde, Avalon, and Burin Peninsulas. Lighthouses of the rest of the island are on the Northwestern Newfoundland page.

Newfoundland and Labrador -- including both the Island of Newfoundland and the mainland territory of Labrador -- became an independent dominion of the British Crown in 1855. The country remained independent until 1949, when the people voted to become the tenth province of Canada.

Having a rocky and much-indented coast, Newfoundland established a large number of light stations, many of which remain active today. Until quite recently, nearly all the lighthouses remained in the care of the Canadian Coast Guard's Newfoundland and Labrador Region. Now preservation organizations are beginning to appear in many communities.

Newfoundland is accessible by air and by car ferries from North Sydney, Nova Scotia. Ferry service is available year-round between North Sydney and Port aux Basques and in the summer between North Sydney and Argentia.

The Lighthouse Society of Newfoundland and Labrador works for the preservation and restoration of lighthouses in the province.

CCG numbers are from the Newfoundland volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from Volume H of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 110.

General Sources
Newfoundland Canada Lighthouses
Photos and information posted by Kraig Anderson.
Newfoundland Lighthouses
Photos by Karen Chappell and Joe Dawson.
Newfoundland Lighthouses
10 fine photos by Karl Josker.
Lighthouses of Newfoundland and Labrador
Photos available on Flickr.com.
Litehouseman's Newfoundland Lighthouses
A fine collection of 37 photos by "Litehouseman."
Lighthouses in Newfoundland and Labrador
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Leuchttürme Kanadas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.
List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals
Official Canadian light lists.


Cape Pine Light, Trepassy, July 2008
W ikimedia Creative Commons photo by Nilfanion


1836 Cape Spear Light, St. John's, 2010
photo copyright André Lafargue; used by permission

Bonavista Peninsula Lighthouses
Note: The Bonavista Peninsula projects northeastward from the east coast of Newfoundland. The peninsula is about 85 km (53 mi) long, separating Bonavista Bay to the north from Trinity Bay to the south.
* Kings Cove Head
1893. Active; focal plane 54 m (176 ft); white flash every 4 s. 11 m (36 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. The keeper's house has been demolished. Tower prefabricated in England by Chance Brothers. Wikimedia has a good photo by John King, a fine closeup photo is available, Geoff Smith has a photo of the lighthouse, freshly painted, in 2007, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on a headland near the town of King's Cove; the town, on NF 235 southwest of Bonavista, holds a lighthouse festival the first weekend of August. Accessible by a hiking trail from town. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 443; ARLHS CAN-662; Admiralty H0540; NGA 1620.
**** Cape Bonavista (1)
1843. Inactive since 1966. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 2-story stone keeper's house. A very rare 1816 catoptric light, with six reflectors, is installed in the lantern. Lighthouse and lantern painted with vertical red and white stripes. Three additional dwellings and other buildings. Robert Hiscock's photo is at right, Josker's photo shows the modern tower behind the lighthouse, Wikimedia has several photos, and Google has a satellite view. This historic light station has been restored to its appearance during the 1870s. Restoration was delayed by a fire set by lightning on 3 August 2001, but the project was completed by reinstallation of the restored catoptric light in September 2003. The lighting apparatus used in Scotland from 1816 and transferred here in 1895 is on display. Located on the point of the cape, about 7 km (4.5 mi) north of Bonavista. Accessible by road; parking provided. Site open; museum and tower open daily mid June to mid October and by appointment in the winter. Owner: Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Site manager: Bonavista Lighthouse Provincial Historic Site.
* Cape Bonavista (2)
1966 (station established 1843). Active; focal plane 51 m (166 ft); white flash every 10 s. 12 m (40 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower with gallery. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). A photo is at right. Located next to the historic lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. CCG 449; ARLHS CAN-093; Admiralty H0536; NGA 1644.
Manuel Island
1918. Active; focal plane 7 m (22 ft); red flash every 3 s. 5 m (16 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern roof painted red. Karen Chappell has a 2008 photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located 400 m (1/4 mile) off Courage's Point in Catalina Harbour, south of Bonavista. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 458; ARLHS CAN-693; Admiralty H0528; NGA 1668.

Cape Bonavista Light, Bonavista, December 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Robert Hiscock
Green Island (Catalina)
1857. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); three white flashes every 12 s. 9 m (30 ft) octagonal cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, stone encased in concrete. Lighthouse painted white with vertical red striping on the lantern dome and a narrow horizontal red band around the gallery. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). 1-story modern keeper's house and two utility buildings, plus a helipad. Anderson's page has good photos, Lighthouse Explorer has a 1989 Coast Guard photo, Geoff Smith has a view from the mainland, and Google has a satellite view. The tower originally rose from the center of a 1-1/2 story keeper's house, which was removed in 1956. Note there is another Green Island Light on the south coast (see below). Located on an island at the southern entrance to Catalina Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 453; ARLHS CAN-687; Admiralty H0526; NGA 1648.
* Fort Point (Admiral's Point) (4)
2003 (station established 1874). Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); white flash every 5 s. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; the octagonal lantern is unpainted gray metallic. Fog horn (blast every 20 s). A 2007 closeup and a more distant view are available, Geoff Smith also has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse here was a rather tall wood tower. The second lighthouse was a short cast iron tower erected in 1921; Anderson has a Coast Guard photo of the first two lighthouses. It was replaced by a skeletal tower in the late 1980s and then by the present lighthouse. Sibling of the Fox Point Light (see above). Located on at the end of a long, narrow peninsula on the south side of the entrance to Trinity Harbour. Site open, tower closed. CCG 462; ARLHS CAN-746; Admiralty H0520; NGA 1696.
Random Head Harbour
1895. Active; focal plane 38 m (126 ft); red flash every 3 s. 10 m (34 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery; solar-powered lens. Lighthouse painted in a red and white checkered pattern; lantern roof is red. Lighthouse Explorer has a good photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The keeper's house and other station buildings have all been demolished. This lighthouse was intended for Heart's Content (next entry) but was diverted to Random Head. The tower was refurbished in the late 1980s and restored in 2009. Located at East Random Head on Motion Island in Trinity Bay east of Hickman's Harbour. Accessible only by helicopter or by boat in heavy seas. Visible distantly from the cliff tops at Random Head. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 465; ARLHS CAN-667; Admiralty H0514; NGA 1704.

Bay de Verde Peninsula Lighthouses
Note: The Bay de Verde Peninsula is the northernmost finger of the much-dissected Avalon Peninsula. The peninsula, some 90 km (55 mi) long, separates Trinity Bay on the west from Conception Bay on the east.
* Heart's Content
1901. Active; focal plane 25 m (83 ft); white light, 4 s on, 2 s off. 9 m (30 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted in a red and white spiral (candy-stripe) pattern; lantern roof is white. The keeper's house and other station buildings have all been demolished. Joanna Poe's photo is at right, an excellent 2006 photo and a 2008 closeup are available, Karen Chappell has a good photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. A crew was ready to install a lighthouse at Heart's Content in 1894 when an order came to build the lighthouse at Random Head (see above). Heart's Content had to wait until 1901 for its lighthouse. The lighthouse must have been repainted in early 2010. In 2014 ownership was being transferred to a local group. Located at the northern entrance to the harbor of Heart's Content, on the east side of Trinity Bay. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 468; ARLHS CAN-543; Admiralty H0510; NGA 1716.

Heart's Content Light, Heart's Content, April 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Joanna Poe
* Hant's Harbour (2)
1957 (station established 1881). Active; focal plane 20 m (65 ft); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern roof is red. The lantern is the 1881 original, but the keeper's house and other station buildings were all demolished in 1957. Litehouseman has a good 2007 photo, Geoff Smith has a distant view, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located on a promontory on the east side of the entrance to Hant's Harbour, on the east side of Trinity Bay. Accessible by a short walk from town, and there is a picnic area adjacent to the lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 470; ARLHS CAN-688; Admiralty H0504; NGA 1728.
Baccalieu Island
1859 (Robert Oke). Inactive since the early 1990s. 11 m (36 ft) round cylindrical brick tower, enclosed by iron plates since 1893, with lantern and gallery, encased in iron since 1893. The lighthouse has a weathered, rusty color. The lantern was prefabricated in Edinburgh, Scotland, by lighthouse engineers David and Thomas Stevenson. The keeper's house and other station buildings have all been demolished. Google's satellite view has no detail on the island. This historic lighthouse is critically endangered by its remote location and lack of maintenance. Located at the north end of Baccalieu Island off the tip of the Bay de Verde Peninsula. Accessible only by helicopter or boat in heavy seas. Site closed May through October (the island is an important bird nesting area); tower closed. Site manager: Baccalieu Island Ecological Reserve. ARLHS CAN-647.
Baccalieu Island (2)
Early 1990s. Active; focal plane 166 m (544 ft); white flash every 6 s. 13.5 m (45 ft) triangular cylindrical steel skeletal tower. Located next to the historic lighthouse. CCG 472; Admiralty H0498; NGA 1736.
[Baccalieu Island Southwest Point (2)]
Date unknown (fog signal station established 1905, light tower added 1953). Active; focal plane 53 m (175 ft); white flash every 10 s. 3.5 m (12 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower, wrapped with a daymark colored white with red bands at the top and bottom. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). 1-story keeper's house and one utility building. Lori Hyde has a view from the sea, Anderson has an aerial photo, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located at the southwest end of the island. Accessible only by helicopter or boat in heavy seas. Site closed May through October (the island is an important bird nesting area); tower closed. Site manager: Baccalieu Island Ecological Reserve. CCG 473; ARLHS CAN-672; Admiralty H0500; NGA 1740.
Harbour Grace (2)
Date unknown (station established 1850). Inactive since about 2000. 6 m (20 ft) square skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted gray. The tower also has a slatted daymark, painted white. Mikhail Kolnik has a closeup photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse, built by Michael Kearny, was a hexagonal wood tower centered on a hexagonal 1-story cottage. Michel Forand has a postcard view of that lighthouse, and a distant photo (halfway down the page) is available. The light was on Point of Beach, at the entrance to the harbor. The second lighthouse was relocated to the south side of the harbor after being replaced by a light (focal plane 11 m (36 ft); continuous red light) on a modern skeletal mast. Site open, tower closed. ex-CCG 481. Modern light: CCG 481.1; Admiralty H0486; NGA 1768.
Green Point (Bay Roberts)
1883. Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); white light, 2 s on, 8 s off. 9 m (30 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern roof is white. The keeper's house was demolished in the 1930s. Geoff Smith's photo is at right, Karen Chappell also has a photo (note the iceberg in the background), and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on a headland on the east side of Bay Roberts, on Conception Bay. Accessible by a rough road (4WD recommended) leading 2.5 km (1.5 mi) from Hibb's Cove. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 486; ARLHS CAN-659; Admiralty H0482; NGA 1784.
Brigus (North Head)
1885. Active; focal plane 34 m (113 ft); white flash every 3 s. 9 m (31 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted with vertical red and white stripes. The keeper's house was demolished after the light was electrified in 1931. Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on North Head, at the entrance to Brigus Harbour on the southwest coast of Conception Bay. Accessible on foot, but it is a rough 6 km (4 mi) from town. A hiking trail, reported earlier to be under development, has been completed. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 488; ARLHS CAN-832; Admiralty H0478; NGA 1788.
Green Point
Green Point Light, Bay Roberts, 2007
photo copyright Geoff Smith; used by permission

St. John's Area (Northern Avalon Peninsula) Lighthouses
** Bell Island (2)
1966 (station established 1940). Active; focal plane 53 m (173 ft); white light, 1 s on, 5 s off. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a square 1-story wood fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white; lantern is gray metallic. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). 1-story keeper's house. Douglas Sprott's photo is at right, Doug Mercer has a good 2002 closeup photo, Litehouseman has an excellent 2007 photo, Geoff Smith has a closeup, BellIsland.net has a page on the light station, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Rapid erosion of the cliff face at this station required replacement of the original lighthouse in 1966, and in 2004 both the lighthouse and the keeper's house were relocated 200 m (660 ft) inland to avoid continuing erosion. The 2007 photo shows that the lighthouse has been covered with new siding. In 2014 the keeper's house was opened as the island's visitor center. Located at the northeast tip of Bell Island in Conception Bay. Accessible by a short gravel road (parking provided); the island is accessible by car ferry from Portugal Cove. Site open, keepr's house open daily during the summer season, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 493; ARLHS CAN-673; Admiralty H0470; NGA 1836.
Cape St. Francis (2)
1957 (station established 1877). Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); white flash every 5 s. Lantern mounted on a concrete 1-story fog signal building. Building painted white with one broad red vertical stripe; lantern is gray metallic. The keeper's house has been removed in favor of a helipad. A photo and a 2007 closeup of the lantern are available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the cape marking the southern entrance to Conception Bay. Accessible by a rough road from Pouch Cove; walking or 4WD recommended (see near the bottom of the page). Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 499; ARLHS CAN-835; Admiralty H0468; NGA 1844.
Bell Island Light
Bell Island Light, Bell Island, 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Douglas Sprott
* Fort Amherst (3)
1951 (station established 1810). Active; focal plane 40 m (132 ft); white light, 1 s on, 14 s off. 8 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern roof is red. Fog horn (blast every 20 s). 1-1/2 story and 1-story keeper's houses (1951) and 1-story fog signal building. Sally Taylor's photo is at right, Mark Veitch has a closeup and a view of the station, Wikimedia has photos, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the second (1852) lighthouse. This is Newfoundland's oldest active light station. Only foundations remain of the original fort and the 1852 lighthouse. The keeper's houses are available for overnight accommodations. Located on the south side of the entrance to the harbor of St. John's, Newfoundland's capital city. Accessible by car at the end of Fort Amherst Road. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Fort Amherst Museum and Tea Room. CCG 506; ARLHS CAN-683; Admiralty H0458; NGA 1848.
**** Cape Spear (1)
1836 (Nicholas Croke and William Parker). Inactive since 1955. 11 m (35 ft) octagonal stone tower with lantern and gallery, projecting from the center of a square keeper's house. House and tower painted white; lantern dome has vertical red and white stripes. André Lafargue's photo appears at the top of this page, an excellent 2006 photo is available, Wikimedia has photos, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This is Newfoundland's oldest lighthouse and second oldest light station. Parks Canada has restored the lighthouse to its 1839 appearance. The lighthouse was repaired and repainted after suffering minor damage in Hurricane Leslie in September 2012. Located southeast of St. John's at the end of NF 11 (Cape Spear Drive). Site open; lighthouse open daily May 15 to October 15. Owner/site manager: Parks Canada (Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site). ARLHS CAN-748.
* Cape Spear (2)
1955. Active; focal plane 71 m (233 ft); three white flashes (separated by 3 s) every 15s. 11 m (35 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). 1-1/2 story keeper's house (1955) and several utility buildings. Ned Zimmerman has a nice sunrise photo, a 2008 photo and a 2009 photo are available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This is the easternmost lighthouse in North America, standing in longitude 52° 37.3' W. Located about 180 m (200 yd) northeast of the original lighthouse. Site open, this tower is closed. Site manager: Parks Canada (Cape Spear Lighthouse National Historic Site). CCG 507; ARLHS CAN-148; Admiralty H0454; NGA 1868.
Fort Amherst Light
Fort Amherst Light, St. John's, September 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Sally Taylor

Cape Race Area (Southern Avalon Peninsula) Lighthouses
Bay Bulls (Bull Head)
1908. Active; focal plane 60 m (197 ft); white flash every 6 s. 11.5 m (38 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. The keeper's house and other station buildings have all been demolished. Litehouseman has a 2007 closeup, Geoff Smith has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the north side of the entrance to Bay Bulls Harbour. Accessible by a 5 km (3 mi) trail from Bay Bulls, which is on NF 10 south of St. John's; the trail is part of the East Coast Trail. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 508; ARLHS CAN-650; Admiralty H0452; NGA 1872.
* Ferryland Head
1871. Active; focal plane 58 m (190 ft); white flash every 6 s. 14 m (46 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, originally brick but encased in iron since 1892. The original lighting apparatus is on display at the Ferryland Museum in town. Tower painted red, lantern white with a red roof. Geoff Smith's photo is at right, Hal Miller has a good 2007 photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The original 1-1/2 story keeper's house is now owned by a local development association, which hopes to develop the building as a museum. The society has renovated the exterior of the house, and the Coast Guard refurbished the tower in the mid 1990s. In recent years, volunteers have offered picnic lunches at the lighthouse to refresh visitors (reservations recommended). In August 2012, ownership of the station was transferred to the Town of Ferryland. Located on a headland at the end of a long peninsula extending east of Ferryland. The town is accessible via NF 10 from St. John's; the light station is accessible at the end of a 2.5 km (1.5 mi) trail. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Town of Ferryland. Site manager: Irish Loop Development Board. CCG 509; ARLHS CAN-656; Admiralty H0450; NGA 1876.
Ferryland
Ferryland Head Light, Ferryland, 2007
photo copyright Geoff Smith; used by permission
* Bear Cove Point (Fermeuse) (2)
1961. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) square skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; two sides of the tower also carry a large daymark with red and white horizontal bands. 1-story wood keeper's house in poor condition. Fog horn (4 s blast every 60 s). Google's satellite view has no detail in this area. Located on a headland about 10 km (6 mi) south of Ferryland and 7 km (4 mi) southeast of Fermeuse. Accessible by a gravel road from Renews, southeast of Fermeuse. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-1326; CCG 512; Admiralty H0448; NGA 1884.
**** Cape Race (2)
1907 (station established 1856). Active; focal plane 52 m (170 ft); white flash every 7.5 s. 29 m (96 ft) cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. The original Chance Brothers hyperradiant Fresnel lens (larger than 1st order) is still in use; one of fewer than a dozen ever built, the lens has a range of 24 miles. Fog horn (2 blasts every 60 s). Two keeper's houses and several utility buildings. A photo is at right, Douglas Sprott has a closeup photo, Litehouseman has a good 2006 photo, Wikimedia has photos, and Google has a satellite view. The original 1856 lighthouse was relocated, first to Cape North, Nova Scotia, and then in 1980 to Ottawa, where it is on display outside the Museum of Science and Technology. This light station, the first landfall for ships bound to Canada from Europe, has an importance in Canadian lighthouse history similar to the importance of Cape Hatteras Light in the U.S. When it was built, it was the world's most powerful lighthouse at 1.5 million candlepower. The station played a key role in communications for decades, and in 1912 it received the SOS call from the Titanic. Cape Race has been designated a national historic site, but the park is undeveloped as yet. Cape Race Heritage, Inc., is working on restoration plans. The exterior of the tower, which had weathered badly, was restored in 1996-97. In 2004 the lighthouse was opened for tours. Located on the southeasternmost point of Newfoundland; accessible by a 20 km (12.5 mi) gravel road (4WD strongly recommended). Site open, tower open to guided tours daily during the summer months. Site manager: Cape Race National Historic Site. CCG 1; ARLHS CAN-118; Admiralty H0444; NGA 1904.
* Powles Head (3)
1960 (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 31 m (101 ft); white light, 1 s on, 9 s off. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a square 1-story fog signal building. Entire building painted white; lantern is red. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). 1-story keeper's house (1961), occupied by a keeper, and several utility buildings. Karen Chappell has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a headland at the eastern entrance to the harbor of Trepassy, west of Cape Race. Accessible by 5 km (3 mi) gravel road (walking or 4WD recommended). Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 5; ARLHS CAN-698; Admiralty H0442; NGA 1908.
Cape Race Light
Cape Race Light, Cape Race, November 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by JMPLTNP2012
* Cape Pine
1851 (Alexander Gordon). Active; focal plane 96 m (314 ft); white flash every 5 s. 15 m (50 ft) old-style round cast iron tower, painted with red and white horizontal bands; lantern is white. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). Two 1-story keeper's houses (1950s), one occupied by a keeper, and several utility buildings. A photo is at the top of this page, Karen Chappell has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The original keeper's house was demolished in the 1950s when the modern housing was built. The lighthouse was painted in the spring of 2007; before and after photos are available. The lighthouse was designated a National Historic Site in 1974. Located on a prominent cape about 25 km (15 mi) southwest of Trepassy. Accessible by an 8 km (5 mi) gravel road (walking or 4WD recommended). Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 6; ARLHS CAN-653; Admiralty H0440; NGA 1920.
* La Haye Point (3)
1990s (station established 1883). Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); white flash every 6 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. The lighthouse is unpainted gray metallic. Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The original lighthouse, an 8.5 m (28 ft) cast iron tower, was demolished in the 1960s. Located at the end of Gulch Road on a point marking the south side of the entrance to St. Mary's Harbour, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) west of the town of St. Mary's. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. CCG 8; Admiralty H0436; NGA 1932.

Placentia Area Lighthouses
Cape St. Mary's
1860 (much modified). Active; focal plane 96 m (314 ft); white flash every 5 s. 17 m (55 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Three 1-story keeper's houses (1959 and 1963) and utility buildings; one keeper's house is occupied by a resident attendant and the others provide housing for the surrounding ecological reserve. André Lafargue's photo is at right, Geoff Smith has a closeup, and Google has a street view, but it has only a fuzzy satellite view. This lighthouse began life as a round brick tower, but the brick weathered rapidly. The tower was coated with cement in 1869 and then covered with iron in 1885. In the mid 1950s, the rusted iron was removed and the lighthouse was surrounded with the current octagonal concrete tower. Located at the extreme point of the cape, south of St. Bride's, marking the southwestern tip of the Avalon Peninsula. Accessible by a single-lane paved road 13 km (8 mi) long. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Cape St. Mary's Ecological Reserve. CCG 14; ARLHS CAN-721; Admiralty H0432; NGA 1952.
Point Verde (3)
1990 (station established 1876). Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft), white flash every 5 s. 11 m (37 ft) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower supporting an enclosed lantern; lantern painted white. Ian Turton has another good photo, and Google has a satellite view. No doubt the lantern is from the 1975 lighthouse, a 6 m (20 ft) fiberglass tower that had to be removed due to shoreline erosion. Located on the point at the southern entrance to Placentia Roads from Placentia Bay, about 3 km (2 mi) west of the city of Placentia. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 16; ARLHS CAN-807; Admiralty H0422; NGA 1960.

Cape St. Mary's Light, St. Bride's, 2007
photo copyright André Lafargue; used by permission

Burin Peninsula East Coast Lighthouses
Marticot Island (3)
1990s (station established 1909). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 15 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. The lighthouse is unpainted gray metallic. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Sibling of La Haye Point. Bing has a distant satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse was an octagonal wood tower attached to a keeper's house; it was demolished in 1961 and replaced by a lantern mounted on the fog signal building. The present light was in place by 1998. Located on an island off the west shore of Placentia Bay about 4 km (2.5 mi) southwest of Little Paradise. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 50; ARLHS CAN-694; Admiralty H0386; NGA 2060.
Long Island
1903. Active; focal plane 72 m (237 ft); white light, 1 s on, 5 s off. 14 m (45 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower, painted white. Bing has a very distant satellite view. Located on the south end of the island, on the west side of Placentia Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 52; ARLHS CAN-692; Admiralty H0380; NGA 2068.
* Tides Cove Point (3)
1993 (station established 1915). Active; focal plane 33.5 m (110 ft); white flash every 6 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Fog horn (one 4 s blast every 60 s). A 2007 photo is available, Lily Fox has a 2009 photo, and Google has a satellite view. This light is similar to the La Haye Point and Marticot Island lights. The original lighthouse had a lantern mounted at one corner of a 1-story wood fog signal building; this was replaced later with a lantern on a concrete fog signal building. Located 2.5 km (1.5 mi) northeast of Fox Cove on the east side of the Burin Peninsula. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 65; ARLHS CAN-1341; Admiralty H0372; NGA 2100.
Little Burin Island (2)
1950s (station established 1915). Inactive since 1977. White octagonal lantern mounted on the roof of the former fog signal building. The active light (focal plane 26 m (85 ft); white light, 2 s on, 8 s off) is on a 6 m (20 ft) aluminum skeletal tower. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). 2-story keeper's house and several utility buildings. Bing has a satellite view of the station. The light was abandoned after being damaged in a storm in 1977. Located on the east side of the island, near the entrance to Burin Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 71; ARLHS CAN-691; Admiralty H0364; NGA 2120.

Burin Peninsula South Coast Lighthouses
* Middle Head (3)
Date unknown (1990s?) (station established 1915). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 15 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. The lighthouse is unpainted gray metallic. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Google has a satellite view. This light is similar to the La Haye Point and Marticot Island lights. Located on the promontory separating Great and Little St. Lawrence Harbours, about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of St. Lawrence. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 73; Admiralty H0360; NGA 2128.
* Allan's Island (Lamaline) (4)
Around 2004 (station established 1880). Active; focal plane 19.5 m (64 ft); white flash every 4 s. 11 m (36 ft) square tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse white with red trim; lantern is gray metallic. This is apparently a skeletal tower covered with siding. 2-story wood keeper's house. Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a wood pepperpot tower, was replaced in 1920 by a round cast iron tower. In 1927 wood range lighthouses were installed A photo is available of the square pyramidal tower built in 1953. Located at the southern tip of Allan's Island, which shelters the harbor of Lamaline. Accessible by a road that crosses a causeway to the island. Site open, tower closed. CCG 76; Admiralty H0350; NGA 2140.
Allan's Island Light
Fortune Head Light, Fortune, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Stephen Anthony

Burin Peninsula West Coast Lighthouses
[Green Island (Fortune Bay) (4)]
1993 (station established 1908). Active; focal plane 45 m (149 ft); white flash every 10 s. 6 m (20 ft) square cylindrical aluminum skeletal tower. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). 1-story keeper's house and three utility buildings. A view from the sea is available, and Google has a satellite view. The original cast iron lighthouse was replaced by a skeletal tower in 1955. This is a staffed Coast Guard station. This Green Island is in Fortune Bay, halfway between the Burin Peninsula and the French island of St. Pierre. There is another Green island Light at Catalina (see above). Located on the summit of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 100; ARLHS CAN-658; Admiralty H0348; NGA 2156.
* Fortune Head (3)
Date unknown (around 2002?) (station established 1911). Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); white flash every 5 s. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; the octagonal lantern is unpainted gray metallic. Stephen Anthony's photo is above right, Litehouseman has a photo, a sunset photo has the French island of Miquelon in the distance, and Bing has a satellite view. This is a staffed station which also serves as the visitor center for the Fortune Head Ecological Reserve. Trails exploring the reserve begin at the light station parking lot. Located on a promontory about 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Fortune. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 102; ARLHS CAN-1284; Admiralty H0325; NGA 2228.
* Grand Bank (East Pier)
1922. Active; focal plane 8 m (27 ft); white flash every 4 s.7 m (23 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Litehouseman has an excellent closeup, Terry Spurrell has a view from the sea, Stephen Anthony has a 2009 view, Lighthouse Explorer also has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The name of the town is written on the tower in red letters. In 2014 ownership of the lighthouse was being transferred, presumably to the town. Located at the end of the south breakwater in Grand Bank, a town on the west side of the Burin Peninsula. Site and tower closed, but there are good views from the waterfront. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 106; ARLHS CAN-686; Admiralty H0322; NGA 2248.
* Garnish
1885. Inactive. 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Active light (focal plane 8 m (28 ft); red flash every 3 s) on a 3.5 m (12 ft) square skeletal tower. Douglas Sprott's photo is at right. The lighthouse has a dilapidated appearance in that photo and in Geoff Smith's 2007 photo, but it appears repainted in Anderson's photos. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the quay at Garnish, a village on the northwestern shore of the Burin Peninsula. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Garnish Heritage Society. CCG 112; ARLHS CAN-685; Admiralty H0318; NGA 2264.
Garnish Light
Garnish Light, Garnish, circa 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Douglas Sprott

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Northwestern Newfoundland | West: St.-Pierre and Miquelon

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Posted December 2002. Checked and revised July 23, 2014. Lighthouses: 37. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.