Lighthouses of Canada: Northwestern Newfoundland

A more accurate name for this page is "Most of Newfoundland," since it includes all the lighthouses of the west coast of the island and most of the north coast and south coast lighthouses as well. Lighthouses of the southeastern corner of Newfoundland, including the Bonavista, Avalon, and Burin Peninsulas, are on the Southeastern Newfoundland page.

Newfoundland and Labrador -- including both the Island of Newfoundland and the mainland territory of Labrador -- became an independent dominion of the British Crown in 1855. The country remained independent until 1949, when the people voted to become the tenth province of Canada.

Having a rocky and much-indented coast, Newfoundland established a large number of light stations, many of which remain active today. Until quite recently, nearly all the lighthouses remained in the care of the Canadian Coast Guard. Now preservation organizations are beginning to appear in many communities.

Newfoundland is accessible by air and by car ferries from North Sydney, Nova Scotia. Ferry service is available year-round between North Sydney and Port aux Basques and in the summer between North Sydney and Argentia.

The Lighthouse Society of Newfoundland and Labrador works for the preservation and restoration of lighthouses in the province.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. CCG numbers are from the Newfoundland volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Admiralty numbers are from Volume H of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 110.

General Sources
Lighthouses of Newfoundland, Canada
Photos and notes by Kraig Anderson.
Lighthouses of Newfoundland
Photos by Karen Chappell and Joe Dawson.
Newfoundland Lighthouses
10 fine photos by Karl Josker.
Lighthouses of Newfoundland and Labrador
Photos available on Flickr.com.
Litehouseman's Newfoundland Lighthouses
A fine collection of 37 photos by "Litehouseman."
Western Newfoundland Lighthouses
Photos from 2002 posted by Tom Duryea.
Lighthouses in Newfoundland and Labrador
Photos by various photographers available from Wikimedia.
List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals
Official Canadian light lists.

Lobster Cove Head Light
Lobster Cove Head Light, July 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo
by Lukester878

South Coast Lighthouses
Note: Facing the open Atlantic, the wild south coast of Newfoundland is difficult to access. Ferries serve the scattered small communities, but only two roads reach the coast: highway 360 runs 205 km (125 mi) from Bishop's Falls to Harbour Breton, and highway 480 runs 150 km (90 mi) from Stephenville to Burgeo. Traditional lighthouses have been replaced by small modern beacons at most of the stations on this coast.
St. Jacques Island
1908. Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white light, 4 s on, 2 s off. 9 m (40 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located on a small island in Fortune Bay near Belleoram. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-669; CCG 118; Admiralty H0304; NGA 2292.
#English Harbour West (1)
1921. Demolished. This light was formerly on a 4.5 m (15 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, but Anderson's photos show that it is now on a small modern beacon (focal plane 14 m (46 ft); red flash every 4 s). Lighthouse painted white. Bill Harris has a photo of the original lighthouse. Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on a promontory on the east side of the entrance to English Harbour West, a town on the Connaigre Peninsula on the northwest side of Fortune Bay. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 119; Admiralty H0302; NGA 2296.
* Rocky Point (Harbour Breton) (2)
1881 (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white flash every 4 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. A 2010 photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, another photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view of the lighthouse. In 2014 ownership was being transferred to the town. Located on the south side of the entrance to Harbour Breton. Accessible by a short walk from the end of Hill Side Drive (highway 360). Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-699; CCG 124; Admiralty H0294; NGA 2316.
[Brunette Island (3)]
Date unknown (station established 1865). Active; focal plane 124 m (407 ft); white flash every 4 s. 7 m (23 ft) square skeletal tower; the upper portion of the tower is covered by a daymark colored white with red bands at the top and bottom. The light is atop the peak at right in Bill Harris's aerial photo of the island, and Bing has a satellite view showing the foundation ruins of the former light station. The original lighthouse, with a light tower centered on a keeper's house, was replaced by a round cast iron tower in 1931. Brunette Island is a substantial, uninhabited island in the entrance to Fortune Bay, about 25 km (15 mi) south of Harbour Breton. Located at the southeast corner of the island. Accessible only by boat (and a steep hike). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-797; CCG 101; Admiralty H0290; NGA 2312.
[Dawson Point (2)]
Date uncertain (station established 1916). Active; focal plane 17 m (55 ft); white flash every 5 s. 4 m (14 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower, partially enclosed by a daymark painted with red and white horizontal bands. Fog horn (blast every 20 s). 1-story keeper's house and several utility buildings. A photo is available, but the tower is hard to find in Bing's satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse was an octagonal pyramidal wood tower. This station was staffed until recently, but was scheduled for automation. Located on a headland on Hermitage Bay near Pushthrough. Accessibility by land and site status unknown. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-838; CCG 134; Admiralty H0276; NGA 2352.
Rocky Point Light
Rocky Point Light, Harbour Breton, June 2010
photo copyright Harbour Breton Coaster
permission requested
[Salmon Point (Taylor Island)]
Date unknown (1980s?). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white flash every 4 s. 6 m (20 ft) square skeletal tower carrying a large daymark with red and white horizontal bars. Keeper's house and other buildings. Bing has a distant satellite view of the area. Taylor Island is a small island on the north side of the entrance to Hermitage Bay. Located on the southeastern tip of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 135; Admiralty H0275; NGA 2356.
François Bay (2)
1966 (fog signal station established 1929, light station 1958). Inactive. Approx. 14 m (46 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower, attached to a 2-story crew keeper's quarters. Lighthouse painted white. The active light (focal plane 46 m (151 ft); green flash every 5 s) is on a square skeletal tower in front of the lighthouse. A 2011 photo and a 2006 photo are available, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located on a promontory on the west side of the entrance to François Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 137; Admiralty H0270; NGA 2360.
* Northwest Head (Ramea)
1902. Active; focal plane 38 m (125 ft); white flash every 3 s. 9 m (30 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and a small gallery, painted with a red and white spiral (candy stripe) pattern. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Petr Chladek has a 2007 closeup, Tracey Barter has a view from the sea, Anthony Rose has a good 2006 photo of the station, Lighthouse Explorer has a 1999 Coast Guard photo, and Bing has a partially-clouded satellite view of the station. Located on an island about 6 km (4 mi) off the coast near the western entrance to Hermitage Bay. Accessible by road or hiking trail from the town of Ramea, which is reached by car ferry from Burgeo. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard.ARLHS CAN-695; CCG 141; Admiralty H0264; NGA 2380.
Boar Island (Burgeo) (2?)
Date unknown (station established 1874). Active; focal plane 63 m (207 ft); white flash every 5 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Google has a satellite view of the station. Lighthouse Explorer has a photo of the original lighthouse, a wood tower attached to a 1-1/2 story keeper's house. This lighthouse was deactivated in 1946 and demolished, but we don't know if the present light dates from that time. Boar Island is about 2 km (1.25 mi) east of Burgeo, and this light serves as the landfall light for the town. Located at the east end of the island. Accessible only by boat, but there are good views from the ferries between Burgeo and Ramea. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-676; CCG 144; Admiralty H0260; NGA 2392.
[Ireland Island (2)]
Date unknown (station established 1886). Active; focal plane 18.5 m (61 ft); white flash every 6 s. 6 m (20 ft) square skeletal mast carrying a daymark colored with red and white horizontal bands. Mikhail Kolnik has a very distant view, but the slender tower is not seen in Bing's satellite view. The original lighthouse was a round cast iron tower. Located on a small island off the entrance to La Poile Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-840; CCG 146; Admiralty H0252; NGA 2404.

Channel-Port-aux-Basques Area Lighthouses
Note: Channel-Port-aux-Basques is a town of about 4000 at the southwestern tip of Newfoundland. The terminal for ferries from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, it is the entry point for many visitors to the island.
**** Rose Blanche
1996 (reconstructed 1873 lighthouse). Reactivated (inactive ca. 1941-2002; now privately maintained); focal plane 29 m (95 ft); flashing red light. 12 m (40 ft) octagonal granite light tower with lantern and gallery, mounted at one end of a 1-1/2 story granite keeper's house; 6th order Fresnel lens. Fog horn (blast every 60 s) nearby. A photo by Ashley Coombshas a good closeup, Greg Hickman has a photo, Anderson's page has photos, a 2007 closeup is available, Wikimedia has distant views, and Bing has a satellite view. The only surviving lighthouse of its type in Canada, this building collapsed during a storm in October 1957 and was in ruins before it was rebuilt by a local preservation society in 1996-97. The lighthouse was relit on 3 August 2002. Located beyond the end of NF 470 about 45 km (28 mi) east of Channel-Port aux Basques. Accessible by a short walk from the end of the road. Site open, lighthouse and tower open daily in season (admission fee). Operator/site manager: Rose Blanche Lighthouse, Inc. ARLHS CAN-668; CCG 150.19; Admiralty H0242.5; NGA 2418.
Colombier Islands
1971 (established as a fog signal station in 1929). Active; focal plane 18.5 m (61 ft); white flash every 5 s. 11 m (37 ft) square cylindrical aluminum skeletal tower. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). A utility building remains from the original fog signal station. Bing has an indistinct satellite view of the station. Located on an island off Burnt Island, midway between Rose Blanche and Channel-Port aux Basques. Accessible only by boat. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-837; CCG 156; Admiralty H0238; NGA 2436.
Rose Blanche Light
Rose Blanche Light, Rose Blanche, October 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by mrbanjo1138
Channel Head (Channel-Port-aux-Basques) (2)
1895 (station established 1875). Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); white flash every 10 s. 11 m (36 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). Robert Hall has a fine sunrise photo, Mel Mashman has a more distant view, Jordan Robichaud has a view from the sea, Wikimedia has two views, Google has a distant street view, and Bing has a hazy satellite view. Located on an island on the west side of the entrance to Channel-Port aux Basques harbor. Accessible only by boat, but visible from the Gulf of St. Lawrence ferry steamers as they enter or leave the harbor and from the mainland at the end of Lawrence Lane. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-654; CCG 160; Admiralty H0222; NGA 2468.
*** Cape Ray (3)
1959 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 37 m (120 ft); white light, 1 s on, 14 s off. 15 m (48 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with a narrow red horizontal band near the top; the lantern is gray. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). The keeper's house is now operated as a museum and gift shop. Lyle Wilkinson's photo is at right, Gary Barfitt has a good August 2006 closeup, Todd Boland has a 2008 closeup, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, Clar Brown has a view of the station, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. Earlier lighthouses were destroyed by fire in 1885 and 1959, respectively. Due to a lack of volunteer guides, the lighthouse was closed to climbing in 2008; it remains closed. The lighthouse was repainted and refurbished in 2013. Located at the southwestern tip of Newfoundland off Highway 1 about 15 km (10 mi) west of Channel-Port aux Basques. Site open; museum open daily in July and August, tower closed. Site manager: South West Coast Development Association. ARLHS CAN-645; CCG 173; Admiralty H0220; NGA 2492.
Cape Ray Light
Cape Ray Light, Channel-Port-aux-Basques, September 2008
Panoramio photo
copyright Lyle Wilkinson; used by permission
* Cape Anguille (2)
1960 (station established 1908). Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 5 s. 18 m (59 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Fog signal (blast every 30 s). Douglas Sprott's photo is at right, Todd Boland has a good 2008 closeup, a fine 2005 photo is available, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. This lighthouse stands on the westernmost point of Newfoundland. In 2002 Lighthouse Digest reported that the destaffed keeper's houses were to be converted to a bed and breakfast, restaurant and craft shop, and for this purpose the station was conveyed to the Southwest Coast Development Association in August 2002. In 2004, the duplex principal keeper's house became the Cape Anguille Lighthouse Inn. The original lighthouse here, built in 1908, was a buttressed ferroconcrete tower. Located at the end of NF 407, northwest of Cape Ray near Codroy. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Southwest Coast Development Association. ARLHS CAN-651; CCG 175; Admiralty H0218; NGA 2504.

Stephenville and Corner Brook Area Lighthouses
Note: Located roughly 225 km (140 mi) north of Channel-Port-aux-Basques, Stephenville and Corner Brook are the largest towns of western Newfoundland. The coast in this area faces west on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It is distinguished by the fishhook-shaped Port au Port Peninsula, which projects 60 km (37 mi) due west into the Gulf and then 50 km (30 mi) northeast sheltering Port au Port Bay.
Harbour Point (Sandy Point)
1883. Active; focal plane 11 m (35 ft); white light, 1 s on, 5 s off. 9 m (31 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Bing has a satellite view. Although Harbour Point is the official name, the lighthouse is usually called the Sandy Point Light. Many photos showed the lighthouse to be in very poor condition, but in 2010 the Coast Guard refurbished and repainted the tower; a 2012 photo shows the results. Located on Sandy Island at the entrance to St. George's Harbour, about 16 km (10 mi) southeast of Stephenville. Accessible only by boat (or a long hike with some wading); tours of the historic island are available. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-690; CCG 178; Admiralty H0208; NGA 2516.
Cape Anguille Light
Cape Anguille Light, Codroy, circa 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Douglas Sprott
* Broad Cove Point Range Front (relocated to Fox Island River)
1955. Inactive since 2005. 9 m (31 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; gallery rail is red. Formerly located on a bluff at Broad Cove Point marking the east side of the entrance to Port au Port Bay. The lighthouse was salvaged by Yve LeRoy, who moved it by helicopter to his back yard in Fox Island River, about 10 km (6 mi) south of the original location. The new owner has restored the lighthouse, as seen in a 2010 closeup photo, and Google has a street view but only a fuzzy satellite view of the area. Located on the south side of Fox Island River. Site and tower closed (private property), but the light is visible from the road, and the owner will sometimes give tours to polite visitors. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-833; ex-CCG 186; ex-Admiralty H0199; ex-NGA 2584.
#Broad Cove Point Range Rear
1955. Inactive since 2005, and apparently demolished then. This was a 15 m (50 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; upper 1/3 enclosed by wood siding. This style of lighthouse is fairly common in mainland Canada, but this tower was the only example in Newfoundland and Labrador. Yve LeRoy used materials from this lighthouse in the restoration of the front light (previous entry). Formerly located about 340 m (375 yd) southeast of the front range tower at Broad Cove Point, about 10 km (6 mi) north of Fox Island River. ARLHS CAN-834; ex-CCG 187; ex-Admiralty H0199.1; ex-NGA 2588.
#South Head (2)
1950s (station established 1925). Demolished in 2010. This was a 7 m (24 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and a distant view is available, but Google has only a distant satellite view of the area. The lighthouse was replaced by round fiberglass tower (focal plane 35 m (116 ft); white flash every 4 s). There is a photo of the new light in sections, ready to be installed, and Anderson has a photo of the installed light. Located at the southern entrance to the Bay of Islands, about 6 km (3.5 mi) north of Lark Harbour. Site open but quite difficult to reach by land. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-751; CCG 192; Admiralty H0192; NGA 2604.
[Frenchman's Head (2)]
Date unknown (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 82.5 m (271 ft); white flash every 6 s. 10 m (33 ft) rectangular cylindrical skeletal tower carrying a daymark colored white with red bands at the top and bottom. Sheika Gallant-Halloran has a view from the sea, a similar view is available, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was a square wood tower attached to a keeper's house. Located atop a steep bluff on the west side of the entrance to the fjord leading to Corner Brook. Site status unknown. ARLHS CAN-839; CCG 198; Admiralty H0186; NGA 2628.

Gros Morne National Park Lighthouses
Note: Gros Morne National Park spans about 70 km (45 mi) of Newfoundland's west coast. The park is accessible by highway 430 from Deer Lake.
* Woody Point (2)
1959 (station established 1919). Active; focal plane 14 m (45 ft); red flash every 4 s. 6 m (20 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern roof is red. A photo is at right, Bert Goodyear has a photo, a 2008 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the entrance to the south arm of Bonne Bay near the community of Woody Point, an enclave in Gros Morne National Park. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-703; CCG 200; Admiralty H0168; NGA 2644.
*** Lobster Cove Head
1897. Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white flash every 4 s. 8 m (28 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. 2-story wood keeper's house now used as a national park visitor center and museum. A photo is at the top of this page, Robert Hiscock has a closeup, another good photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Sibling of the Channel Head Light. In 2014, ownership of the lighthouse was being transferred to Parks Canada. Located on the north side of the entrance to Bonne Bay, near Rocky Harbour. Site open, keeper's house open daily June through September, tower closed. Site manager: Gros Morne National Park. ARLHS CAN-646; CCG 201; Admiralty H0164; NGA 2640.
Woody Point Light
Woody Point Light, Woody Point, June 2006
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Psythe
*** Cow Head
1905. Inactive since 1988. 5 m (18 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim. Mel Mashman has a 2007 closeup, Geoff Smith has a 2008 closeup, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. As of 1988 the abandoned lighthouse was endangered by neglect, rusted, and open to the elements. In November 2001, the Central Development Association won a grant for tourist development in the area, including restoration of the lighthouse. The restoration was completed in 2002. Located on a headland near the town of Cow Head; a marked hiking trail leads to the lighthouse. Site and tower open. Site manager: Town of Cow Head. ARLHS CAN-680.

Great Northern Peninsula West Coast Lighthouses

Note: Newfoundland's Great Northern Peninsula extends about 250 km (155 mi) north northwest, separating the Gulf of St. Lawrence from the Atlantic. The peninsula is 65-80 km (40-50 mi) wide for most of its length. At its northern end, the Strait of Belle Isle separates the island of Newfoundland from Labrador. Highway 430 follows the west coast of the peninsula almost to its end.
Keppel Island (1)
1901. Inactive since 1992. Square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Active light (focal plane 37 m (121 ft); white light, 1 s on, 15 s off) on 11 m (37 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Lighthouse Explorer has a closeup photo, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The town of Port Saunders acquired the light station and hoped to restore it, but these plans came to naught. In June 2013, the town put the keeper's houses and other outbuildings up for sale. Located atop a bluff on an island in the entrance to Hawke's Bay, about 10 km (6 mi) south of Port au Choix. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Town of Port Saunders. ARLHS CAN-661.
Keppel Island (2)
1992 (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); white flash every 15 s. 11 m (36 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with gallery. Located adjacent to the historic light station. Site open, tower closed. CCG 208; Admiralty H0156; NGA 2668.
* Pointe Riche (Port au Choix) (2)
1892 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 29 m (96 ft); white flash every 5 s. 19 m (63 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Mark Plummer's photo is at right, Wikimedia has Gordon Robertson's photo, and Bing has a satellite view. The original lighthouse was destroyed by fire in August 1890. The present lighthouse was repainted in early 2009, as seen in Brittney Anyon's photo. Near the lighthouse, archaeologists have found remains of four distinct Indian cultures. Located at Port au Choix, north of Corner Brook on NF 430. Accessible by a dirt road or by hiking the Phillip's Garden Coastal Trial. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Port au Choix National Historic Site. ARLHS CAN-666; CCG 211; Admiralty H0154; NGA 2680.
* New Férolle Peninsula
1913. Active; focal plane 27 m (91 ft); four white flashes, separated by 1 s, every 7.5 s. 19 m (64 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with six ribs, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern is red. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, an excellent 2007 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. This substantial lighthouse marks the southern entrance to the Strait of Belle Isle; it carries a light with a range of 20 nautical miles (37 km, 23 mi). Located at Férolle Point. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-655; CCG 220; Admiralty H0148; NGA 2704.
Pointe Riche Light
Pointe Riche Light, Port au Choix, September 2002
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Mark Plummer
Flowers Cove (Flowers Island) (1)
1899. Inactive since 1969. 15.5 m (51 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house. Building painted white, lantern red. The active light (focal plane 5 m (17 ft); green flash every 3 s) is on a 4m (13 ft) skeletal tower. A 2006 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The light station has been acquired by the town of Flower's Cove, and the Straits Island Development Association has restored it as a tourist attraction. Located on Rocky Island in the mouth of Flower's Cove. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Town of Flower's Cove. ARLHS CAN-657; CCG 213; Admiralty H0144; NGA 2724.
* Nameless Point
1969. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white flash every 10 s. 12 m (39 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower with gallery. Anderson has a photo, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. More important than it might seem, this light stands opposite Labrador's Point Amour lighthouse in marking the narrowest passage of the Strait of Belle Isle. The strait here is about 15 km (9 mi) wide. Located at the end of a finger-like peninsula about 3 km (2 mi) north of Flowers Cove. Site open, tower closed. CCG 222; Admiralty H0142; NGA 2736.

Cape Norman and Cape Bauld Lighthouses
Note: Cape Norman and Cape Bauld represent the northwestern and northeastern tips, respectively, of the Great Northern Peninsula. These lighthouses guide vessels entering the Strait of Belle Isle from the Atlantic.
* Cape Norman (3)
1964 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 35 m (116 ft); three white flashes (separated by 6 s) every 30 s. 15 m (50 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower; the original 3rd order Barbier, Benard & Turenne Fresnel lens is in use. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). The keeper's house has been demolished, but a 1-story utility building survives. Mark Plummer's photo is at right, J. Turner has a 2009 closeup, Geoff Smith has a 2008 photo, and a good 2003 photo is available, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Sibling of Cape Bauld Light. The second lighthouse here, built in 1907, was the first of the buttressed ferroconcrete lighthouses. Located at the northernmost tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. Accessible by gravel road from Cooks Harbour. Site and tower closed (light station fenced). Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-679; CCG 223; Admiralty H0140; NGA 1032.
Cape Bauld (3)
1962 (station established 1884). Active; focal plane 54 m (177 ft); white flash every 15 s. 15 m (50 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower with lantern and gallery; Fresnel lens of unknown order. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). 2-story hipped-roof wood keeper's house (1922) and 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1961). The two buildings are now used as an inn (transportation to the site provided). Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, Ryan Patey has a panoramic photo, a winter view of the station is available, and Google has a very distant satellite view of the station. The second lighthouse here, built in 1908, was a buttressed ferroconcrete tower; Lighthouse Explorer has two Coast Guard photos of that light. Located at the northern tip of Quirpon Island ("Quirpon" is pronounced "harpoon"). Accessible only by boat or helicopter (helipad provided). Site manager: Quirpon Lighthouse Inn.ARLHS CAN-652; CCG 225; Admiralty H0132; NGA 1052.
Cape Norman Light
Cape Norman Light, Cooks Harbour, September 2002
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Mark Plummer

St. Anthony and Conche Area Lighthouses
Note: St. Anthony and Conche are small ports on the eastern side of the Great Northern Peninsula.
* Fox Point (Fishing Point, St. Anthony) (3)
2002-03 (station established 1912). Active; focal plane 27 m (88 ft); white flash every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) square pyramidal tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; the octagonal lantern is unpainted gray metallic. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). Pavel Trebutov's photo is at right, a 2008 photo and an excellent photo are available, a more distant view shows the fog signal building and keeper's house, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The 1-story wood keeper's house is now used as a café. Lorne Hull has a 2002 photo of the 1960 lighthouse, a square skeletal tower covered by white siding. Located at the south entrance to the harbor of St. Anthony. Accessible by car and by a hiking trail from town. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Lightkeepers Seafood Restaurant. ARLHS CAN-684; CCG 240; Admiralty H0730; NGA 1068.
* Conche (Silver Point) (1)
1914. Inactive since 1992. 4 m (14 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white. The active light (focal plane 20 ft; red light, 1 s on, 5 s off) has been moved to a square cylindrical aluminum skeletal tower a few feet farther from shore. A 2010 photo is available, but Google's satellite view has no detail in the area. Sibling of Westport Cove. The lighthouse was in severe disrepair until it was rebuilt by local volunteers. A boardwalk provides access to the tower. Located just offshore on Silver Point at the entrance to Conche Harbour. Conche is accessible by a gravel road off NF 433. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Town of Conche. ARLHS CAN-749; CCG 247; Admiralty H0722; NGA 1096.

Fox Point Light, St. Anthony, September 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Pavel Trebutov

Baie Verte Peninsula Lighthouses

Note: The broad Baie Verte Peninsula projects from the north coast of Newfoundland, separating White Bay on the west from Notre Dame Bay on the east.
* Westport Cove
1906. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); white flash every 4 s. 3 m (10 ft) octagonal pyramidal wood tower with lantern. Lighthouse painted white. Lighthouse Explorer has a closeup photo, but Google has only a distant satellite view of the area. A good candidate for the title of Canada's smallest lighthouse. Located on the north side of the harbor, on the east side of White Bay; accessible by a hiking trail from the town of Westport Cove. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-702; CCG 260; Admiralty H0704; NGA 1140.
Gull Island (Cape John)
1884. Active; focal plane 160 m (525 ft); white flash every 10 s. 14 m (45 ft) cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, attached by a long covered passageway to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted with red and white vertical stripes; lantern roof is white. Additional 2-story keeper's house and other buildings. Google has a distant satellite view of the island. Lighthouse Digest has a July 2004 feature article by Jeremy D'Entremont on life at this isolated station. In 2014 ownership was being transferred, it's not clear to whom. Located at the top of a high, barren island off the northeastern tip of the Baie Verte Peninsula. Accessible only by helicopter or by boat in heavy seas. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-660; CCG 326; Admiralty H0686; NGA 1172.

Notre Dame Bay Lighthouses

Note: Notre Dame Bay is a large sound occupying the central third of the north coast of Newfoundland. The shores of the bay are dissected into numerous smaller bays, with many islands.
Long Island East End
1904. Active; focal plane 31 m (103 ft); white flash every 6 s. 9 m (30 ft) cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on an octagonal concrete base. Formerly painted white, the lighthouse is now painted red with a white lantern. Keeper's house demolished. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo of the all-white lighthouse, but the tower is hard to see in Google's satellite view of the site. The lighthouse was completely restored in 1990. Located on the eastern end of Long Island, on the south side of Notre Dame Bay. The island is accessible by car ferry from Pilley's Island, but the lighthouse is difficult to reach by land. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-682; CCG 340; Admiralty H0675; NGA 1212.
Surgeon Cove Point
1911. Active; focal plane 74 m (242 ft); three white flashes (separated by 4 s) every 15 s. 9 m (30 ft) cast iron tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted with red and white vertical stripes; lantern roof is white. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). 1-story keeper's house and other buildings. Lighthouse Explorer has an older Coast Guard closeup, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view of the station. Located on an island in the Bay of Exploits, on the southwest side of Notre Dame Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-490; CCG 347; Admiralty H0656; NGA 1240.
**** Long Point (Twillingate)
1876. Active; focal plane 101 m (331 ft); white flash every 5 s. 15 m (50 ft) concrete-encased brick tower with lantern and gallery, square cylindrical at the base and octagonal conical above, attached by a covered passageway to a 1-1/2 story keeper's house. Tower painted red, lantern and watch room white. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). Staffed Coast Guard light station. André Lafargue's photo is at right, Lighthouse Explorer has another of Lafargue's photos, Peter Brake has a good 2008 photo, a 2011 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. This lighthouse has a unique design. The brick tower was encased in concrete after it cracked during a 1929 earthquake. In 2012, the lighthouse hosted a special exhibit of Titanic artifacts. The island has a spectacular site: located at Devil's Cove Head on North Twillingate Island, with a sweeping view of Notre Dame Bay and its rocky islands. The island is linked to the mainland by a causeway. Located at the northern tip of the island, at the end of highway 340. Site open, keepers will often open the tower to visitors. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-285; CCG 358; Admiralty H0640; NGA 1272.
Bacalhao Island
1894. Active; focal plane 106 m (348 ft); white flash every 10 s. 14 m (45 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a small utility building. Lighthouse painted in a red and white spiral (candy-stripe) pattern; lantern roof is red. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). Next to the lighthouse, a sector light is displayed (on demand) from a square cylindrical skeletal tower carrying a red and white daymark. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and Bing has a distant satellite view. The original keeper's house was removed in 1966; there is modern housing located 400 m (1/4 mi) northeast. Located at the southwest end of the island, about 25 km (15 mi) east of Twillingate. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-647; CCG 363; Admiralty H0636; NGA 1300. Sector light: CCG 362.5; Admiralty H0635; NGA 1302.
Twillingate Light
Long Point (Twillingate) Light, Twillingate, August 2007
photo copyright André Lafargue; used by permission

Hamilton Sound and Wadham Islands Lighthouses

Note: Hamilton Sound lies between Fogo Island and the mainland on the northeastern shoulder of Newfoundland.
Change Islands (2)
Date unknown (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); white flash every 4 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower carrying a daymark colored red with a white horizontal band. Valeri Kolnik has a photo, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. The original lighthouse, a square pyramidal wood tower, has been demolished. Located at the southwestern tip of South Change Island. The island is accessible by ferry from Farewell. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-836; CCG 368; Admiralty H0626; NGA 1332.
* Burnt Point (2)
1990 (station established 1905). Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); white flash every 6 s. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Fog horn (one 4 s blast every 60 s). The entire structure is gray metallic. Lee Shelp has a closeup photo of the light tower, Valeri Kolnik has a winter photo, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard aerial photo, and Google has a wintry satellite view. The original lighthouse, a square tower rising from a corner of a square fog signal building, was demolished in 1990. Located on a point of land marking the east side of the entrance to Seldom Harbour, on the south side of Fogo Island. The island is accessible by ferry from Farewell. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-677; CCG 378; Admiralty H0612; NGA 1400.
Offer Wadham Island
1858 (Robert Oke). Inactive since early 1990s (?). 12 m (40 ft) (?) octagonal cylindrical tower with gallery, brick and stone encased in concrete. Lantern removed. The active light is on a 6 m (20 ft) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower (focal plane 30.5 m (100 ft); white flash every 3 s). The Coast Guard photo from the Lighthouse Explorer page is at right, and Bing has a satellite view. The tower was first encased in cast iron; the concrete was added in 1961. Located on a small island between Fogo Island and Musgrave Harbour, in the entrance to Hamilton Sound. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-696; CCG 396; Admiralty H0584; NGA 1440.
Peckford Island (2)
1961 (station established 1910). Active; focal plane 16 m (51 ft); white flash every 10 s. 7 m (24 ft) square cylindrical shingled brick tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a 1-story shingled fog signal building. Entire building painted with black and white vertical stripes. 1-story keeper's house (1961). Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located on the southeastern tip of Peckford, the largest of the Wadham Islands, about 6.5 km (4 mi) southwest of Offer Wadham Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-697; CCG 395; Admiralty H0586; NGA 1444.
Offer Wadham Light
Offer Wadham Light, Wadham Islands
Canadian Coast Guard photo
North Penguin Island (1)
1890. Inactive since the mid 1980s. 17 m (56 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower, lantern removed. The keeper's house and other station buildings have been demolished. Google has a satellite view. The term "penguin" formerly applied to the great auk, a northern seabird now extinct. The two Penguin Islands lie to the south of the Wadham Islands. Located on the eastern tip of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-841; CCG 403; Admiralty H0588; NGA 1464.

West Side Bonavista Bay Lighthouses
Note: Bonavista Bay is a large embayment at the northeastern corner of Newfoundland. The three lights listed here are on islands on the west side of the bay; for lighthouses of the more accessible eastern shore, see the Southeastern Newfoundland page.
Cabot Islands (Bonavista Bay)
1880 (Austin Oke). Active; focal plane 22.5 m (74 ft); white flash every 5 s. 15 m (50 ft) octagonal tower with lantern and gallery, cast iron encased in concrete. Lighthouse painted with horizontal red and white bands; lantern roof is white. Fog horn (blast every 60 s). Keeper's house demolished, but the station includes the original fog signal building, generator house, and modern keeper's house. The active light (focal plane 14 m (46 ft); white flash every 6 s) is on a short skeletal tower. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, but the lighthouse is not seen in Google's fuzzy satellite view. In 1960, the keeper's house was demolished and the original round cast iron tower was encased in concrete. Located on a small island 6 miles southeast of Cape Freels in the northern entrance to Bonavista Bay. Accessible only by helicopter or by boat in heavy seas. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-068; CCG 406; Admiralty H0576; NGA 1496.
Puffin Island (2)
1951 (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 21 m (70 ft); white light, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off. 8 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with a square wood lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with a single horizontal red band. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). 2-story wood keeper's house (1951) and two utility buildings, all painted white with a single horizontal red band. This is a staffed station, one of the few remaining in eastern Canada. The Coast Guard photo from the Lighthouse Explorer page is at right, Google has a very distant street view of the station, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse was a square granite tower attached to a granite keeper's house. Located on an island about 400 m (1/4 mi) off Greenspond on the northwest side of Bonavista Bay. Accessible only by boat, but there's a good view from Greenspond. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-418; CCG 430; Admiralty H0556; NGA 1556.
Little Denier Island
1888. Active; focal plane 91 m (298 ft); white flash every 3 s. 9 m (30 ft) round cylindrical cast iron tower with lantern and gallery; solar-powered lens. Entire lighthouse painted with vertical red and white stripes. The keeper's house and other light station buildings have all been demolished. Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located on a high island east of Salvage, off the tip of the Eastport Peninsula. Essentially inaccessible; landing on the steep-sided island is extremely difficult. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-663; CCG 441; Admiralty H0543; NGA 1608.
Puffin Island Light
Puffin Island Light, Greenspond, July 1992
Canadian Coast Guard photo

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: Labrador | East: Southeastern Newfoundland | South: St. Pierre and Miquelon | West: Northeastern Québec

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Posted December 2002. Checked and revised August 4, 2014. Lighthouses: 41. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.