Lighthouses of the Northern Netherlands

A small country with a long maritime tradition, The Netherlands is home to a large number of historic lighthouses. For centuries, fires were lit atop brick towers to guide returning Dutch sailors, and even today the traditional Dutch word for a lighthouse is vuurtoren (fire tower). (The Dutch word lichthuis, though often translated "lighthouse," actually means a lantern room.)

This page includes lighthouses of the northern part of the country, including the provinces of Noord Holland (North Holland), Gelderland, Flevoland, Friesland, and Groningen. This region includes the Amsterdam area and the IJsselmeer as well as the Frisian Islands.

The IJsselmeer is the shallow sound stretching northeast from Amsterdam, the remnant of the former Zuiderzee. More than half the original area of the Zuiderzee has been reclaimed as dry land by Rijkswaterstaat IJsselmeergebied, the IJsselmeer Directorate, an agency of the Ministry of Transport and Waterways. In 1975 a second dike was completed across the center of the IJsselmeer, from south of Enkhuizen to Lelystad, cutting off the southwestern part of the IJsselmeer as a separate lake called the Markermeer. The Markermeer was to be drained, but this project has been postponed indefinitely and may never be carried out. Since these are inland waterways, lights of the IJsselmeer and Markermeer are not carried on the international light lists.

There is strong interest in the country in lighthouses and their preservation, and many towers have been restored in recent years.

Lighthouses in the Netherlands are maintained by the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment. Lighthouses of the IJsselsmeer are maintained by a separate division of the ministry, the Rijkswaterstaat IJsselmeergebied, formerly called RDIJ. In recent years there has been a movement to transfer some of the historic towers to the ownership of municipal authorities.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. NL numbers are from the official Dutch list as listed on the Vuurtorens in Nederland web site. U.K. Admiralty numbers are from volume B of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 114.

Ijmuiden Range Rear Light
IJmuiden Range Rear Light, Velsen, January 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Martin de Witte

General Sources
Online List of Lights - Netherlands
Photos posted by Alexander Trabas.
Leuchttürmseiten von Anke und Jens - Netherlands
This frame-based site has photos and information on many of the lights.
Leuchttürme.net - Niederlande
Photos and text posted by Malte Werning.
Lighthouses in Netherlands
Excellent aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lighthouses of the Netherlands
Excellent photos by Marc de Kleijn, including larger versions of his photos shown on this page.
Nederlandse Vuurtorens
An extensive photo collection by Dennis Nijhuis.
Majáky - Holandsko
Photos by Anna Jenšíková.
Netherlands Lighthouses
Photos by Larry Myhre.
Phares d'Europe
Photos posted by Alain Guyomard and Robert Carceller, including about 20 Dutch (Pays-Bas) lighthouses.
Lighthouses in the Netherlands
Photos available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Netherlands
Photos by various photographers available on Lightphotos.net.
Netherlands Lighthouses
Historic postcard views posted by Michel Forand.
Holländische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.
Lightships in the Netherlands
The Netherlands page of Iris Klempau's comprehensive site on world lightships.
Lange Jaap
Lange Jaap, Den Helder, September 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Helmut Steiner

Lighthouses of Noord Holland (North Holland)

Velsen (IJmuiden Area) Lighthouses
Note: The North Sea Canal (Noordzeekanaal), completed in 1876, connects Amsterdam to the North Sea at IJmuiden. The IJmuiden lighthouses are all associated with the entrance to the canal.
IJmuiden Nieuwe Zuiderhoofd (New South Breakwater)
1966. Active; focal plane 15 m (50 ft); continuous green light; there is also a white light, flash every 3 s, shown only during fog. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern, painted with green and white horizontal bands. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s). Fritz van Eck has a 2010 closeup, Trabas has a good photo by Capt. Peter Mosselberger, Werning has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the south breakwater at IJmuiden. Accessible only by boat; there are good views from the foot of the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-168; NL-1334; Admiralty B0767; NGA 9808.
* IJmuiden Oude Zuiderhoofd (South Inner Pierhead) (4)
1966 (station established 1880). Active; focal plane 12 m (40 ft); quick-flashing green light; in fog a continuous white light is shown instead. 10 m (33 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with green and white horizontal bands. The tower also carries a tall mast with weather instruments. Capt. Peter Mosselberger's photo is at right, Werning has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Forand has postcard views of the first (1880), second (post-World War I), and third (post-World War II) lighthouses. Located on the south inner pier (the former breakwater) at IJmuiden. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-169; NL-1340; Admiralty B0770; NGA 9812.
* IJmuiden Lage (Range Front)
1879 (Quirinius Harder). Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); continuous light, white or red depending on direction; during the day a continuous white light is shown along the range line only. 24 m (79 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted a reddish brown; lantern is white with a reddish-brown dome. A rotating radar transmitter stands on a mast beside the lantern. Adjacent to the lighthouse is a 3-story building housing the harbor control center and a restaurant; Werning has a photo showing this building. Trabas has a closeup by Klaus Kern, Wikimedia has an article with a good photo by Willem Jans, Google has a panoramic view from the gallery, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view showing the lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands, and Forand has a similar postcard view dated 1902. The range guides ships into the harbor of IJmuiden, which connects to Amsterdam via the Noordzeekanaal. Lighthouse prefabricated by D.A. Schretlen & Co. of Leiden. In 1909 the tower was reconfigured; the upper portion was removed and relocated to Vlieland (see below); in addition, the daymark was changed from black and white to red and white. In 1966 the lighthouse was moved 40 m (130 ft) when the range line was shifted; at that time the lantern was replaced and the old lantern sent for display at Velsen Noord. Located off the Seinpostweg on the south side of the harbor entrance in IJmuiden. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-047; NL-1330; Admiralty B0766; NGA 9792.

IJmuiden Oude Zuiderhoofd Light, IJmuiden
photo copyright Capt. Peter Mosselberger; used by permission
* IJmuiden Hoge (Range Rear)
1879 (Quirinius Harder). Active; focal plane 53 m (174 ft); white flash every 5 s. 43 m (142 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted a reddish brown; lantern is white with a reddish-brown dome. Two 4th order Fresnel lenses in use. Martin de Witte's photo is at the top of this page, Anke/Jens has an excellent photo, Trabas has a fine photo by Arno Siering, Wikipedia has an article with a photo by Gerard Hogervorst, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This magnificent tower was prefabricated by D.A. Schretlen & Co., of Leiden. Forand has a postcard view, and Huelse also has a postcard view, both showing the lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands; the daymark was changed to red and white in 1909. Located at the end of the Middenhavenstraat, between the two inner harbor basins of IJmuiden. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-046; NL-1332; Admiralty B0766.1; NGA 9796.
* [IJmuiden Range Front (lantern)]
Date unknown. Round lantern, painted white with a red dome. Malte Werning has a photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This lantern is displayed at the end of the Third Rijksbinnenhaven pier in Velsen Nord, on the north side of the harbor. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: unknown.
* IJmuiden Nieuwe Noorderhoofd (New North Breakwater)
1966. Active; focal plane 15 m (50 ft); continuous red light. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a good photo by Capt. Peter Mosselberger, Werning has a photo, the Anke/Jens site has a page with photos showing all four breakwater and pier lights as seen from the south pier light, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of the south breakwater at IJmuiden. The Trabas photo shows that this light is accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-166; NL-1336; Admiralty B0768; NGA 9800.
* IJmuiden Oude Noorderhoofd (North Inner Pierhead) (3)
1966 (station established 1880). Active; focal plane 12 m (40 ft); quick-flashing red light; in fog a continuous white light is shown instead. 10 m (33 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted with white, red and black horizontal bands. Werning has a good photo, Trabas has a photo by Capt. Peter Mosselberger, taken from the south pier light, and Google has a satellite view. Forand has historic postcard views of the first (1880) and second (post-World War I) lighthouses. Located on the north inner pier at IJmuiden. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-167; NL-1338; Admiralty B0769; NGA 9804.

Bergen Lighthouse
** Egmond aan Zee (van Speijk Memorial)
1834. Active; focal plane 37 m (121 ft); white light, 5 s on, 5 s off; red light is shown over a sector along the shore to the north. 28 m (92 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story masonry building; the watch room has been expanded to a large 16-sided observation room. Tower painted white; lantern and observation room painted gray. Stephan Rinke's photo is at right, Trabas has a fine closeup photo by Joke Reijnen, Werning also has a good photo, Wikimedia has numerous photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Huelse has a postcard view showing the daymark screens added to the lighthouse in 1873 and removed in 1915. In Forand's 1922 postcard view the screens have been removed. The lighthouse was built as a memorial to Jan C. J. van Speijk (or van Speyk), a Dutch naval lieutenant who died when he blew up his own gunship to prevent it from falling into the hands of Belgian revolutionaries at Antwerp in 1831. Lighthouses were present here in the 18th century, but the early history of the station is unclear. Located on the seaside boulevard at the foot of Van Speijkstraat in Egmond aan Zee, about 20 km (13 mi) north of IJmuiden. Site open, tower open by appointment. ARLHS NET-007; NL-1476; Admiralty B0842; NGA List 9864.
Van Speijk Lighthouse
J.C.J. van Speijk Light, Egmond aan Zee, September 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Stephan Rinke

Den Helder Lighthouses

Note: Den Helder is the municipality at the north end of the Noord Holland peninsula. The lighthouses here are associated with the Zeegat van Texel, the historic entrance to the Zuider Zee between Den Helder and the island of Texel.
* Zanddijk (Julianadorp, Groote Kaap) (3)
1985 (station established 1871). Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); directional light, white, red, or green depending on direction, occulting once every 10 s. 17 m (56 ft) round cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery, painted orange-red with a darker band at the base; lantern painted white. The Anke/Jens site has a fine photo, Trabas has a closeup, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The first (1871) and second (1966) lighthouses served as the rear lights of a range, but the front light was demolished with the new lighthouse with a directional light was installed in 1985. Located on the North Sea dike about 15 km (9 mi) southwest of Den Helder, marking the approach to the Zeegat van Texel. Accessible by road, but no parking is provided. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-077; NL-1482; Admiralty B0849: NGA 9876.
* Huisduinen (3)
1948 (station established at least by 1864). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); continuous white light; a red sector is shown to the northwest. 18 m (59 ft) square brick building, a 5-story channel traffic control tower. The control room on the top floor is surrounded by a gallery. Tower is unpainted red brick; control room level painted white. Trabas has an excellent photo by Klaus Potschien, Werning has a nice photo with Lange Jaap in the background, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The first lighthouse here served as a front range light for Lange Jaap. In 1900 it was replaced by the Schulpengat rear light on a skeletal tower, seen at the right rear of a historic photo (the tower in the center is a watchtower, and Lange Jaap is on the left). The present tower is open for overnight accommodations. Located in the village of Huisduinen, just west of Den Helder. Site open, tower open only to paying guests. ARLHS NET-005; NL-1492; Admiralty B0856: NGA 9880.
* Kijkduin (Den Helder, "Lange Jaap (Long James)") (2)
1877 (Quirinius Harder). Station established 1822. Active; focal plane 57 m (187 ft); four white flashes, separated by 3.1 s, every 20 s. 63.5 m (208 ft) 16-sided cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted red; lantern painted white with a red dome. 1st order Fresnel lens in use. Rotating radar antenna mounted atop the lantern. Helmut Steiner's photo appears at the top of this page, Wikipedia has an article on the lighthouse, Trabas has a closeup photo by Klaus Potschien, Werning has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. One of the world's great lighthouses, this was the tallest Dutch lighthouse until the Maasvlakte lighthouse was built at Rotterdam in 1974. It is the tallest enclosed cast iron lighthouse in the world. Prefabricated by Penn & Bauduin in Dordrecht. The lighthouse was closed to the public in 1998 due to safety concerns. The lighthouse also serves as the rear light of an outbound (westbound) range; the front light is a post on the Nieuwediep Breakwater. Located in Huisduinen, just west of Den Helder. Site open; due to safety concerns the tower has been closed to tours since 1998. ARLHS NET-051; NL-1494; Admiralty B0858; NGA 9884.
[Kijkduin (Lange Jaap) lantern]
Date unknown. The shell of the former lantern of the Lange Jaap lighthouse is displayed out of doors in the royal dockyard of Willemsoord in Den Helder. Thanks to Anna Jenšíková for the November 2006 photo at right. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Site open.

Kijkduin lantern, November 2006
photo copyright Anna Jenšíková
used by permission
*** Lichtschip 10 Texel
1952. Decommissioned 1994. 39 m (128 ft) steel lightship, the light displayed from a square pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery amidships. Entire vessel painted red. A photo is at right, Peter Kok has a good 2008 photo, Cees Backers has a 2007 photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Built by Rijkswerf Willemsoord in Den Helder, this ship served most of its career on the Texel station off the Zeegat van Texel entrance, with a few assignments to other stations. It was converted to an automated lightfloat in 1976. Since 1995 it has been moored in Den Helder as a museum. Volunteers have been working to restore the ship to its appearance before the automation. Located at Weststraat 1 on the Den Helder waterfront. Site open, vessel open several days per week; check locally for the schedule. Site manager: Stichting Museumhaven Willemsoord. ARLHS NET-016.
* Lichtschip 11 Texel (light tower)
1953 (Rijkswerf Willemsoord, Den Helder). 45 m (148 ft) steel lightship. The ship served for many years on the Goeree station, but it was transferred to Texel in 1988. In January 1991, it was swept ashore by a powerful winter storm and broke up on the dike. The square pyramidal skeletal light tower, with lantern and gallery, were salvaged and are displayed onshore near Lichtschip 10 (previous entry). The light tower is at the left in the photo at right, another photo shows both lightships, and Google has a good street view. Located at Weststraat 1 on the Den Helder waterfront. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Stichting Museumhaven Willemsoord.
Lightship Texel
Lightship Texel, Den Helder, August 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Wistula

Texel Lighthouses
Note: Texel (pronounced "Tessel" in Dutch but "Teksel" in Frisian and English) is the largest and southernmost of the Dutch Frisian islands and the only one included in the province of Noord Holland. The island is about 20 km (13 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide, and it has a permanent population of more than 13,000. Texel is readily accessible by ferry from Den Helder, and another ferry connects the north end of the island to Vlieland, the next island in the Frisian chain (see below under Lighthouses of Friesland).
* Schilbolsnol (3)
1977 (station established 1872). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); continuous directional light, white, red or green depending on direction. 21 m (69 ft) steel mast topped by a small lantern and gallery. Entire structure painted green. Trabas has a closeup photo by Klaus Potschien, Salko de Wolf has a panoramic view, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The light is nicknamed 't Licht van Troost (Troost's Light) after three generations of early keepers named Troost. A history of the station is available. The first light was on a 7 m (23 ft) tower; it was replaced in 1912 by a 22 m (72 ft) steel tower. The 1912 lighthouse was demolished in 1977, but its lantern was saved for display at Oudeschild (see below). Located 2 km (1.2 mi) west northwest of 't Horntje. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-066; NL-1496; Admiralty B0859; NGA 9952.
* Den Hoorn (Schulpengat Range Rear)
1970s. Active; white light occulting once every 8 s, day and night, visible only on the range line to the south southwest. Square brick church tower with the range light mounted on the gallery (balustrade), at the base of the steeple. Church is unpainted red brick, tower painted white. Trabas has a good photo by Klaus Potschien, Gerard Stolk has a 2007 photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The array of three locomotive-style lamps seen in Stolk's photo has been replaced by a modern range light. The tower is believed to date from about 1450. Located on the north side of the village of Den Hoorn. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-035; NL-1488; Admiralty B0852.1; NGA 9948.
* [Schilbolsnol (2) (lantern)]
1883 (relocated to Schilbolsnol in 1956). Inactive since 1977. Round cast iron lantern with a conical roof, painted red, displayed on a short square wood skeletal tower. A photo is available, and the lantern is centered in a Google satellite view. This lantern was originally mounted on the former Emden Kaap lighthouse of Rottumeroog, an island in the mouth of the Ems River at the Dutch-German border. In 1956 it was transferred to the 1912 Schilbolsnol lighthouse near 't Horntje, the seaport at the southern end of the island of Texel. When that lighthouse was replaced in 1977, the lantern was donated to the Shipwreck and Beachcombing Museum in Den Burg, where it is on display outside the museum. Site open. Owner/site manager: Schipbreuk en Juttersmuseum Flora.
Texel West (De Koog)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane unlisted; five yellow flashes every 20 s. Approx. 18 m (59 ft) round cylindrical tower with double gallery, topped by a tall mast. Lower part of the tower painted yellow, upper part white. Trabas has a photo by Klaus Potschien, and Google has a satellite view. This tower carries a tide gauge. Located about 1 km (6 mi) off the central west coast of Texel near De Koog. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty B0889.5.
**** Eierland (Texel) (2)
1864 (extensively rebuilt in 1948-49). Active; focal plane 53 m (174 ft); two white flashes, separated by 2.3 s, every 10 s. 35 m (114 ft) round cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted red; lantern and watch room painted white. 3rd order Fresnel lens in use. Ralf Schulze's photo is at right, Wikipedia has an article with several photos, Trabas has a closeup photo by Klaus Potschien, the Anke/Jens site also has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Eierland was formerly a separate island, but it has been joined to Texel since 1630 by construction of sea dikes. Huelse has a postcard view of the original lighthouse showing a coastguard lookout tower in front of the main tower. In April 1945, prisoners of war from Soviet Georgia seized the lighthouse during a revolt against their German captors; the Germans retook the station, severely damaging the lighthouse in the process. The lighthouse was rebuilt with a new cylindrical brick wall surrounding the damaged original. Additional restoration was carried out in 1996. For many years the lighthouse was painted a rose color; in 2004 it was repainted in the original bright red. The light station is endangered by beach erosion, which has been controlled by a sea wall. Located at the north end of the island of Texel, marking the Engelschmangat, the inlet between Texel and Vlieland. Accessible by road; Texel is accessible by ferry from Den Helder. Site open, tower open daily April through October and usually open Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday the rest of the year (may be closed for short periods in midwinter). ARLHS NET-024; NL-2064; Admiralty B0886; NGA 9960.
Vuurtoren Eierland
Eierland Light, Texel, October 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Ralf Schulze
* [Kaap Oosterend]
1854. Daybeacon, never lit. Approx. 15 m (49 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower, painted black. Paul Raven has a photo, and Google has a satellite view; the Google street view shows only the top of the tower. This elegant design is by Quirinus Harder. The beacon was restored in 2010 by the municipal government. Located on a headland at Oosterend, on the east side of Texel. Site open, tower closed.

Hollands Kroon Lighthouses
* Den Oever (Wieringen) (2)
1885 (A.C. van Loo) (relocated 1930; Den Oever station established 1918). Inactive since 2009. 16 m (52 ft) hexagonal pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; access to the lantern is by a stairway that spirals up through the skeletal framework. Entire lighthouse painted red, except the ventilator ball and windvane on the top are white. Larry Myhre's photo is at right, Werning has a photo, the Anke/Jens site has a good photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Historically, Wieringen was an island on the south side of the entrance to the Zuiderzee. Technically, it is still an island, separated from the mainland by the Amsteldiepkanaal. The lighthouse of Den Oever, at the eastern end of Wieringen, has a complex history. Originally it was located near the western end of the island and served as the rear light of a range guiding vessels toward the Zuiderzee. Huelse has a postcard view of the lighthouse in its original location. In 1930, after the great dike called the Afsluitdijk closed off the mouth of the Zuiderzee and created the IJsselmeer, the lighthouse was relocated to stand at the south end of the dike and on the north side of the the Stevin lock that admits ocean-going ships to the IJsselmeer. Initially the lighthouse faced outward, toward the Waddenzee, but in 1932 it was moved 70 m (230 ft) south and turned so that it faces the IJsselmeer. The light was deactivated in April 2009. There was also an earlier (1918) lighthouse at Den Oever, seen in a postcard view posted by Forand and a second postcard view posted by Huelse; this lighthouse was moved in 1930 to Zeughoek (see next entry). ARLHS NET-006; NL-1584; ex-Admiralty B0879.
* Zeughoek (2)
1969 (station established 1930). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, 5 s on, 5 s off. 14 m (46 ft) square unpainted steel skeletal tower with gallery. Frits van Eck has a good 2009 photo, Waymarking.com has a photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has a fuzzy satellite view. The 1918 Den Oever lighthouse (see previous entry) was relocated to Zeughoek in 1930. The old and severely deteriorated tower was replaced in 1969 by a tower of the same design, but without a lantern. Located on a headland about 7 km (4 mi) southeast of Den Oever. Site open, tower closed. NL-1604.

Medemblik Lighthouse
* Medemblik Oosterhaven (replica)
2005 (station established 1641). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light occulting once every 5 s. 14 m (46 ft) wood post with quadrupod bracing, painted black. Benches surround the base of the tower. A 2012 photo is available, Harry Kool has a 2011 closeup, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This light replicates historic lights of the past; tripod or quadrupod lights are shown in a 1670 stained glass window and on an 1812 map (upper right corner of the map). The light was built in 2005 following a proposal by the town's historical foundation, the Stichting Stadsherstel Medemblik. Located on the north side of the entrance to the harbor of Medemblik, a historic town about 10 km (6 mi) west of Enkhuizen. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Gemeente Medemblik. NL-1606; Admiralty B0877.9.
Den Oever Light
Den Oever Light, Hollands Kroon, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Larry Myhre

Enkhuizen Lighthouses
* De Ven (Enkhuizen) (2)
1700. Reactivated (briefly inactive in 2009); focal plane about 18 m (59 ft); white light, 2.5 s on, 7.5 s off. 15 m (50 ft) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern, attached to 1-1/2 story keeper's house. Tower painted white, lantern red. Stefan Didam's photo is at right, the Anke/Jens site has a great photo, Werning has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a postcard view from the 1930s, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. There was an earlier lighthouse, but its date of construction is unknown. The present tower is the only survivor of three identical towers built about 1700 to guide ships through what was then the Zuiderzee to Amsterdam. The tower was repaired after being gutted by fire in 1819. A lantern was added in 1834 and a Fresnel lens the following year. It was listed as a national monument in 1966. The light was deactivated in April 2009; after numerous protests it was reactivated in October, although without its former red sector light. Located on a prominent bend in the west coast of the IJsselsmeer about 6 km (3.5 mi) north of Enkhuizen. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-003; NL-1618.
* Enkhuizen (Range Rear) (3?)
1888 (station established before 1859). Deactivated in 1932, but in recent years a continuous red light has been displayed from a bracket on one leg of the tower at a focal plane of about 5 m (16 ft). 14 m (46 ft) octagonal pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with gallery and a small lantern. Tower painted with black legs and gallery and white cross-members. Werning has an excellent photo, Wikimedia has a closeup, a 2012 closeup is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a good satellite view. This old lightbeacon is well known and often visited. An image of the 1859 light is available, and another engraving shows an even earlier light. In an image of around 1900 the lamp is missing, but the tower has a spiral staircase instead of the present ladder. Located at the end of the south breakwater at the entrance to the old harbor of Enkhuizen. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS NET-037.

Hoorn Lighthouse
* Hoorn West Havendam
Date unknown (station established in the 1600s). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 14.5 m (47 ft) wood post with quadrupod bracing, painted black. A 2010 photo and a 2007 closeup are available, and Google has a satellite view. An engraving shows a somewhat similar light in the mid 1600s. Located at the end of the west breakwater at Hoorn, a town on the Markermeer about 20 km (13 mi) southwest of Enkhuizen. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. NL-1658.
De Ven Light
De Ven Light, Enkhuizen, August 2010
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Stefan Didam

Edam-Volendam Lighthouse
* Volendam
1934(?). Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); white flash every 5 s, shown only to the southeast through the narrow harbor entrance. Square wooden cupola with a pyramidal roof, mounted on the roof of a waterfront building. Cupola painted white, roof red. Paul van Grieken has a photo, another photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Volendam is a port on the Markermeer, the southwestern arm of the IJsselmeer, about 32 km (20 mi) northeast of Amsterdam. The building was built as a fish auction house. Site presumably open. Owner/site manager: Village of Volendam. ARLHS NET-188; NL-1674.

Waterland Lighthouses
* Lightship 9 Terschellingerbank (light tower)
1933. Inactive since 1979 (a decorative light is displayed). Approx. 10 m (33 ft) square skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted red. A photo is available showing a light in the tower, Iris Klempau has posted a photo by Jens Vahldiek, and Google has a satellite view. The light tower of the Terschellingerbank was removed when the ship was decommissioned. The tower was restored in 2002. The ship was last reported laid up at Walsoorden in South Holland. Located on the waterfront in Monnickendam, a large recreational harbor just off the Gouwzee, the protected bay behind the island of Marken southwest of Volendam. Site manager: unknown.
* Marken (2) (lantern)
1901. Inactive since 1992. Cylindrical cast iron lantern, painted white with a red dome. A photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This is the lantern mounted on the 1839 Marken Light in 1901 and replaced in 1992. It has been restored and is on display on the waterfront of Marken, on the west side of the island of the same name. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: unknown.
** Marken (Paard van Marken) (2)
1839 (J. Valk). Station established 1700. Active; focal plane 16 m (53 ft); white light occulting once every 8 s. 15.5 m (51 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is red. A photo is at right, the Anke/Jens site has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a street view by Martin Bos. Because of its profile as seen from a distance, the lighthouse is traditionally called het paard van Marken (the horse of Marken). The original lighthouse was one of the siblings of De Ven Light. In the winter, northeast winds funnel ice down the IJsselmeer toward the lighthouse, sometimes endangering the buildings; the original keeper's house was destroyed by ice in 1879, the present keeper's house was heavily damaged in 1900, and in 1971 ice reached the roof of the keeper's house. A 1987 photo showing ice around the lighthouse is available. The lantern was replaced in 1992, and the fog horn was deactivated in 2001. Located at the eastern tip of the island of Marken, in the Markermeer about 30 km (19 mi) northeast of Amsterdam. The island is accessible by a causeway. Site open; tower also open on occasion but we do not know the schedule. ARLHS NET-017; NL-1684.
Vuurtoren Marken
Marken Light, Waterland, June 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Schaacke

Amsterdam Lighthouses
Hoek van 't IJ (2)
1893 (A.C. van Loo) (station established 1700). Reactivated (inactive 2003-04); focal plane 18 m (59 ft); red or white light depending on direction, 3 s on, 2 s off. 19.5 m (64 ft) octagonal skeletal tower with enclosed watch room, lantern and gallery. Skeletal tower painted black, lantern and watchroom white; lantern dome is red. Marion Golsteijn's photo is at right. Werning has a photo, Trabas has a distant view, a view from the water is available, and Google has a satellite view. The IJ (Het IJ or 't IJ in Dutch) is the traditional harbor of Amsterdam, located at the southwestern corner of the former Zuiderzee, now the Markermeer. The original lighthouse here was one of the siblings of De Ven Light. The historic 1893 light was prefabricated in Leiden by Nederlandse Grofsmederij. Declared a national monument in 1981, it was deactivated in September 2003 but put back in service the following year. Recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the station has been transferred to the Staatsbosbeheer, a land preservation and management agency. In 2011 the agency issued a request for proposals to restore the buildings (cost estimated between €1 and 2 million) and propose commercial use of the island while maintaining its status as a monument. Located on Vuurtoreneiland (Lighthouse Island), an island off the point (the Hoek 't IJ) at the northern entrance to the harbor, near Durgerdam. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed, but visible easily from the mainland. Owner/site manager: Staatsbosbeheer. ARLHS NET-010; NL-1710; Admiralty B0835.
Trinity House Lightship 12
1952. Decommissioned 1988. 41.2 m (137 ft) steel lightship; light displayed from a square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Built by Philip & Son, Dartmouth, England. The ship served many stations off the English coast in the service of Trinity House. After passing through several owners, the ship found its way to Amsterdam, where Iris Klempau found it moored at Grasweg 53-82 in good condition. For a time there were reported to be plans to convert it to a museum. However, Anna Jenšíková found no evidence of such a conversion when she visited the ship in June 2007. In July 2008, the ship was purchased by Jeff De Wolf, one of the owners of Lightship 94 (next entry). According to Iris Kelmpau, as of July 2014 the ship was moored in the Johan van Hasseltkanaal-West just west of the Ridderspoorweg bridge. Google has a satellite view of the ship at that location, and there is a May 2013 photo of it there, but Google's street view, also dated July 2014, does not show the ship. Perhaps it left a few days before the street view! Current location and site status unknown. ARLHS NET-160.
Hoek van t'IJ Light
Hoek van t'IJ Light, Amsterdam, September 2013
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Marion Golsteijn
Trinity House Lightship 94 Brightside (Finley)
1939. Decommissioned 1990. 41.2 m (137 ft) steel lightship; the light was displayed from a square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Entire vessel painted red. Carl Guderian has an October 2007 photo, Larry Myhre has a photo, Scheepvaartnieuws (Shipping News) has a 2013 photo (bottom of the page), and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Built by Philip & Son, Dartmouth, England. The ship served many stations off the English coast in the service of Trinity House. After passing through several owners, the ship came to the Netherlands in 1998 and was restored in Den Helder. With the new name Zeeburg it was moored at the Open Haven Museum in Amsterdam, where it was available for parties. However, the Museum went out of business in 2003. In 2005, the ship was reported to be included in a new historic ship museum established at the former NDSM shipyard. Iris Klempau visited the ship in July 2005 and found it in good condition. However, there was delay in implementing plans for the vessel, and when Anna Jenšíková visited the ship in June 2007, she found it deserted and detriorating. Soon thereafter, new owners renovated the vessel and reopened it as a site for business meetings and private parties. The new operators have renamed the lightship Brightside. As of 2014, however, the ship was closed and its status is uncertain. Located at the end of the NDSM pier off the Ondinaweg on the north side of the IJ in Amsterdam. Site open, vessel closed. ARLHS NET-161.

Muiden Lightship
German Lightship Noorderlicht (ex-Flensburg)
1910. Decommissioned 1963. 46 m (151 ft) steel lightship, since converted to a 2-masted schooner. Hull painted red. Originally rigged with 3 masts, the ship served on the Kalkgrund shoal off the entrance to the Flensburg Fjord on Germany's Baltic coast. Klempau has a page for the lightship, and Wikimedia has Holger Ellgaard's 1961 photo of the ship on station. After being decommissioned it served for a number of years as a dormitory for workers on the Flensburg waterfront. Later it was used as a club ship for a yacht club. In 1992, by then a rusty hulk, it was rescued by Ted van Broeckhuysen and Gert Ritzema. Converted to a schooner, it is used for adventure cruises to Svalbard and other destinations in the Arctic. Muiden is its base. Owner/operator: Noorderlicht.

Lighthouses of Gelderland

* Harderwijk (De Vischpoort)
1851. Reactivated (inactive 1947?-2006, now mostly decorative); flashing white light. Approx. 15 m (50 ft) structure, octagonal lantern with gallery mounted atop a 3-story brick town gate building. Larry Myhre's photo is at right, a July 2006 photo is available, Fred Vanderbom has a 2007 photo, Forand has a 1951 postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The building is said to date from the 14th century and became the town gate in 1592. The lantern, added sometime in the nineteenth century, was restored in 2006 as part of waterfront redevelopment. A Fresnel lens, possibly the original, is in use. The local archeological society has a page with the history of the Vischpoort and lighthouse. Located on the waterfront in Harderwijk, which was formerly on the south shore of the Zuiderzee and is now on the south shore of the Veluwemeer, the remnant channel between the Zuid Flevoland polder and the mainland of Gelderland. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-162.
* Elburg (Elborgh)
1731. Inactive since 1989. Square brick tower (built in 1594) topped by an octagonal pyramidal spire, with a lantern mounted on a bracket on one side of the spire. Nijhuis has an excellent photo, Werning also has a photo, Forand has a 1953 postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The historic fortress town of Elborgh formerly stood at the southeastern corner of the Zuiderzee. Since the reclamation of the Oost Flevoland Polder, it has stood beside the Drontermeer, the narrow residual channel between the polder land and the original mainland. Located at the traditional main gate (also called the Vischpoort) on the northwest side of the old town of Elburg. Site open, tower status unknown. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS NET-181.

Harderwijk Light, Harderwijk, June 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Larry Myhre

Lighthouses of Flevoland

Note: Flevoland is the province including the two great polders, tracts of land reclaimed from the former Zuiderzee between 1932 and 1968. All the lighthouses of the province are in the Noordoostpolder, which replaced the eastern arm of the Zuiderzee. The polder contains two former islands, Schokland and Urk, both having historic lighthouses.
* Kraggenburg (Zwolsche Diep)
1877. Inactive since 1942. 11 m (36 ft) lantern centered on the roof of 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house. Lantern painted white with a red dome. Fog bell mounted on the roof. The Anke/Jens site has a wonderful closeup photo, Werning also has a good photo, Forand has a 1976 postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. This building was formerly the home of the harbormaster, but there is no longer any harbor. The lighthouse now sits in the middle of a field in the Noordoostpolder about 3 km (2 mi) north of the Ketelmeer, the remnant arm of the former Zuiderzee between the Noordoostpolder and the mainland. The lighthouse is a private residence. Located about 8 km (5 mi) east of Ens and 2.5 km (1.5 mi) southeast of Kraggenburg. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse can be seen from outside the wall. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS NET-158.
** Blokzijl (replica)
2008 replica of a 1907 lighthouse. Approx. 6 m (20 ft) hexagonal cast iron lantern and gallery mounted on a square wood skeletal foundation. Lantern and gallery painted white. Nijhuis has a page with a photo, another photo is available, there's a historic photo of the original lighthouse, and Bing has a satellite view. The original light stood at the end of long pier at Blokzijl, then on the northeastern shore of the Zuider Zee. It was dismantled in 1942, after completion of the Nordoost Polder left it far inland. The replica is at the original location, now surrounded by farm fields. The light is a short distance from a hiking trail that follows the former dike at the edge of the Zuider Zee. Located about 1 km (0.6 mi) southwest of Blokzijl and 1 km (0.6 mi) northwest of Vollenhove. Site open, and anyone can climb the ladder to the gallery.
* Schokland Noordpunt (replica)
2007 replica of a late 1800s lighthouse; station established early 1800s. Station inactive since around 1940. 9 m (30 ft) square steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted black. The 1-1/2 story keeper's house of the historic lighthouse stands next to the tower, and the original 1-story brick fog signal building also survives. Arjan Keers has a photo, a good 2011 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Schokland was an island in the former Zuiderzee, and the original lighthouse marked the northern end of the island. Since the 1930s, all of the island has been incorporated into the Noordoostpolder. The prefabricated replica lighthouse was trucked to the site and erected in a single day in May 2007. Piet Kelder has a photo of the historic light station (almost 1/4 the way down the page), and Forand has a 1946 postcard view. Located about 4 km (2.5 mi) west northwest of Ens and 3 km (2 mi) east of Nagele. Site open, tower closed.
** Urk (3)
1845 (J. Valk). Station established 1837. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 5 s. 18.5 m (61 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 2-story keeper's house. Rotating Fresnel lens in use. Tower painted white with black trim; lantern painted red with a green dome. Joëlle Kole's photo is at right, Anke/Jens site has an excellent closeup photo, Werning also has good photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a 1963 postcard view, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse is similar to the Marken lighthouse (see above), also built by Valk. Lights were lit at Urk as early as 1617; at that time, Urk was an island in the Zuiderzee, as seen in a 1934 aerial view posted by Forand. The original lighthouse was lost to beach erosion in 1837 and replaced by a temporary wood tower. The present lighthouse was originally shorter, as seen in a 1890s photo; it was extended by 5 m (17 ft) in 1899. Since the reclamation of the Noordoostpolder in the 1930s, Urk has been joined to the mainland, and the lighthouse now stands on the east shore of the IJsselmeer. The lighthouse was restored in 1972 and was declared a national monument in 1981. Although the light was automated in 1989, former keeper Koert Bakker continued to monitor the light station and give guided tours by arrangement. Located on a promontory in the town of Urk. Site open, tower open only to guided tours. ARLHS NET-026; NL-1956.
Rotterdamse Hoek
Approx. 1950. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); white or red light, depending on direction, 5 s on, 5 s off. 7.5 m (25 ft) square cylindrical brick tower with gallery, unpainted. The light is displayed from a mast at one corner of the gallery. A photo and a 2004 photo (4/5 the way down the page) are available, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse marks an angle of the dike enclosing the Noordoost Polder; the place is named "Rotterdam Point" because the dike is built largely from rubble from the buildings in Rotterdam destroyed by German artillery in 1940. Located about 12 km (7.5 mi) north of Urk. The lighthouse is best seen by boat, as there does not appear to be any road access to this location. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-173; NL-1964.

Urk Light, Urk, February 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Joëlle Kole

Lighthouses of Friesland: Mainland

Lemsterland Lighthouse
**
Lemmer (2) (replica)
1993 replica of 1887 lighthouse. Inactive. 19 m (63 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; access to the lantern is by a stairway that spirals up through the skeletal framework. Skeletal tower painted gold, lantern and gallery black. De Kleijn has an excellent closeup, the Anke/Jens site also has a good photo, and Google has a street view as well as a satellite view. Huelse has a postcard view of the original cast iron lighthouse, and Forand has a postcard view from the 1940s. The historic lighthouse was demolished in 1968. This replica was built for a movie, De Vuurtoren (The Lighthouse). The lighthouse bears a curious resemblance to the lighthouse at Puerto Plata in the Dominican Republic, although the two towers are not related. Forand has an 1886 postcard view of the earlier light at Lemmer. Located at the end of the Vuurtorenweg in the harbor of Lemmer, on the east side of the IJsselmeer just north of the Noordoost Polder. Site and tower open, according to Anke/Jens, although the stairway has only a single railing and is not for the faint-hearted. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS NET-014.

Súdwest-Fryslân Lighthouses
* Stavoren South Pierhead
1885. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); continuous green light. 7 m (24 ft) hexagonal pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted with green and white horizontal bands. Werning also has a good photo, Wikipedia has a photo showing both pier lights, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the south breakwater in Stavoren, on the northeast coast of the IJsselmeer; accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-070; NL-2006.
* Stavoren North Pierhead
1885. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); continuous red light. 6 m (21 ft) hexagonal pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning also has a good photo, Wikipedia has a photo showing both pier lights, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the north breakwater in Stavoren; accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-069; NL-2004.
* Stavoren High (Range Rear) (2?)
1884 (A.C. van Loo). Station established at least by 1780. Active; focal plane 15 m (50 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 16 m (52 ft) hexagonal pyramidal cast iron skeletal tower with lantern and gallery; access to the lantern is by a stairway that spirals up through the skeletal framework. Tower painted red, lantern white with a red dome. De Kleijn has an excellent closeup, the Anke/Jens site has an excellent photo, Werning also has a photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. RDIJ restored this historic tower in 2001. According to the Vuurtorens in Nederland site, the front light (NL-1994) is on a 6 m (20 ft) post. However, several sites claim that the south pierhead light is the front light. Probably there are ranges on both lines. An engraving shows a lighthouse at Stavoren in 1781. Located just off the Kooijweg on the north side of the harbor in Stavoren. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-159; NL-1996.
* Workum (3?)
1778 (station established 1623). Inactive since 1932, but possibly reactivated around 2007. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical brick tower with gallery, painted white, attached to 1-1/2 story brick dwelling. No lantern; there is a flagpole at one corner of the gallery. Udo Ockema's photo is at right, the Anke/Jens site also has two great photos, and Google has a satellite view. Blogger Stephen Kraan has posted some information (in Dutch) on the history of this lighthouse. The original wood tower was replaced by a stone tower in 1708. The present house was built in 1712, but the light tower was not added until 1778. The tower carried open fires until a lantern was added in 1880. The lighthouse was deactivated when the Zuiderzee was diked and became the IJsselmeer. The lighthouse is a private residence. According to Kraan, the owner, named Reid, worked for years to restore a light to the tower, and the 2007 photo at right shows a short mast with a light. This light is also seen in Wim Schut's 2008 photo. Located on a small hill about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) north of Hindeloopen and 4 km (2.5 mi) southwest of Workum. Site and tower closed, but the tower can be viewed from nearby. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS NET-179.

Workum Light, Workum, October 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Udo Ockema
* Makkum Range Rear (De Waag)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); continuous green light. Light mounted somewhere on the spire crowning De Waag, a historic 4-story brick building. Bert Kaufmann has a photo, H. Bouwstra has a second photo, Wikimedia has several photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. De Waag was built in 1698 by a merchant's guild for the inspection of meat and dairy products like cheese and butter. The range, apparently of fairly recent origin, guides vessels approaching Makkum through a new channel from the IJsselmeer. The front light is on a post. Located on the Voorstraat in downtown Makkum. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. NL-2020.

Harlingen Lighthouses
** Harlingen (6?)
1921 (C. Jelsma) (station established 1904). Inactive since 1998 (a decorative light is displayed). Approx. 23 m (75 ft) square cylindrical brick and concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is black. Stefan Schlautmann's photo is at right, De Kleijn has a great photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The station has a long and poorly-known history. A 16th century wood lighthouse was followed by a stone tower on a fort at the harbor entrance, then by a second stone tower (1759). In 1882 a 12 m (39 ft) wood tripod carried a lantern; this was followed in 1904 by a hexagonal wood tower. Huelse has a postcard view of the 1904 lighthouse. After deactivation this handsome and historic lighthouse was converted to a bed and breakfast. The new owners raised the lantern and inserted a glass-enclosed observation room atop the main part of the tower. Overnight accommodations available. Located on the Havenweg south of the harbor entrance in downtown Harlingen, overlooking the Waddenzee. Site open, tower open to bed and breakfast guests. Owner/site manager: Vuurtoren van Harlingen. ARLHS NET-009; ex-Admiralty B0914.2.
Trinity House Lightship 8 Radio Waddenzee
1949. Decommissioned 1991. 41.2 m (137 ft) steel lightship; light displayed from a square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Pieter Musterd has a photo, Huub van den Hengel has several photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Built by Philip & Son, Dartmouth, England. The ship served many stations off the English coast in the service of Trinity House. After being decommissioned the ship was named Barocca and used as a discotheque at the Wijnhaven in Rotterdam. The discotheque closed in 2001 and the ship was towed to Moerdijk. In 2004 it was returned to Rotterdam, where Iris Klempau spotted it moored in the Waalhaven. In 2005 it was sold to Radio Waddenzee. It now houses a radio station, but is also available for meetings. In the warmer months it is anchored at the Zuidepier in Harlingen, but it spends the winter in a more protected location in the harbor. Owner/site manager: Radio Waddenzee. ARLHS NET-187.
* Harlingen Range Rear
1976. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 19 m (62 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with gallery. Lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The front light is on a short post. Located next to a warehouse on the main quay of Harlingen, just west of the historic lighthouse. NL-2118; Admiralty B0913.61.
Harlingen Light
Harlingen Light, Harlingen, May 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Stefan Schlautmann

Lighthouses of Friesland: Frisian Islands

Note: The Frisian Islands, or Wadden Islands, are a chain of barrier islands along the North Sea coast of the Netherlands and Germany. The southernmost island, Texel, is in Noord Holland (see above). Vlieland, Terschelling, Ameland, and Schiermonnikoog, the remaining inhabited islands in the Netherlands, are in Friesland. All the islands are readily accessible by ferries and are popular seaside resorts.
Vlieland Lighthouse
*** Vlieland (Vuurboetsduin, Vuurduin) (2)
1909 (station established 1836). Active; focal plane 54 m (177 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 17 m (55 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and double gallery, painted red; lantern is white with a red dome. 1st order Fresnel lens in use. An observation tower stands next to the lighthouse. Rutger de Moddertukker's photo is at right, the Anke/Jens site has excellent photos, Trabas has a photo by Klaus Potschien, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. Huelse also has a postcard view of the 1836 lighthouse. The present lighthouse was constructed using the upper portion of the 1879 IJmuiden Front Light (see above). The earlier history of Vlieland lights is not well known at all; there are references to lights at least as early as 1543. Located on a dune, the Vuurboetsduin, the highest point of Vlieland, just west of the port town of Oost Vlieland. Site open; tower open daily but hours are limited (inquire locally). Vlieland is accessible by passenger ferry from Harlingen on the mainland; in the summer there is also ferry service from the northern end of Texel. (Visitors are not allowed to bring vehicles to the island, but bus transportation is provided.) ARLHS NET-028; NL-2066; Admiralty B0894; NGA 9968.

Terschelling Lighthouse
* Terschelling (Brandaris) (3)
1835 (station established about 1330; tower built in 1594 by Pieter Albertsz. Clock from Medemblik). Active; focal plane 56 m (184 ft); white flash every 5 s. Massive 52.5 m (172 ft) square brick tower with lantern, gallery, and an enclosed modern observation room. Two 4th order Fresnel lenses in use. The Anke/Jens site has a good photo, Trabas has a photo by Kees Aalbersberg, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The original tower collapsed in 1593 and a replacement tower was a failure, collapsing shortly after completion. The present monumental tower, a triumph of late 16th century engineering, was built as a lighthouse, but fires were displayed from its top for only about a decade. It then waited more than 200 years before fulfilling its original purpose of guiding ships through the Zeegat van Terschelling into the Waddenzee and Zuiderzee. Today it is one of the most famous lighthouses in the Netherlands. Located in the village of West Terschelling near the western end of the island of Terschelling (accessible by ferry from Harlingen). Site open; only the first floor of the tower (used as a wedding chapel) is open to visitors. ARLHS NET-025; NL-2080; Admiralty B0904; NGA 9980.
Vuurtoren Vlieland
Vlieland Light, Vlieland, November 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Rutger de Moddertukker

Ameland Lighthouse
*** Ameland (Bornrif) (2)
1881 (Quirinius Harder) (station established 1876). Active; focal plane 58 m (190 ft); three white flashes, separated by 2.8 s, every 15 s. 55 m (181 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and double gallery, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a great photo by Klaus Kern, a 2007 closeup is available. Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse was prefabricated by Nering Bögel in Deventer. The 2nd order Fresnel lens in use was used at Goedereede 1908-1912 and then at Westhoofd from 1912 to 1940; it was installed at Ameland in 1952. The lantern was replaced in 1988; the original lantern is mounted above the entrance to the Maritiem Centrum Abraham Fock in Hollum. Sjaak Elzinga has a closeup photo of the lantern, and another photo is available. In 2004, ownership of the lighthouse was transferred to the municipality of Ameland. The original light here was described as an "iron stand." Located in Hollum at the western end of the island of Ameland; the island, a popular tourist destination, is accessible by ferry from Holwerd. Site open; tower is open for climbing but the schedule is not available. ARLHS NET-001; NL-2162; Admiralty B0920; NGA 9996.

Schiermonnikoog Lighthouses
* Schiermonnikoog 
1854. Active; focal plane 44 m (144 ft); four white flashes, separated by 3.1 s, every 20 s; there is also a continuous directional light, white or red depending on direction, shown only to the northeast, at a focal plane of 30 m (98 ft). 36 m (118 ft) round brick and stone tower with lantern and gallery, painted bright red; lantern is white with a red dome. 3rd order Fresnel lens. Two 1-1/2 story keeper's houses. Peter Voerman's photo is at right, the Anke/Jens site has an excellent photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view showing a secondary light in front of the main tower. Older photos show various paint schemes on the tower; the present red was applied in 1998. Located near the west end of the island of Schiermonnikoog, west of the town of the same name. The island is accessible by passenger ferry from Lauwersoog on the mainland; special permission is needed to bring cars to the island. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-021; NL-2192; Admiralty B0938; NGA 10008.
* Schiermonnikoog South (Zuidertoren)
1854. Inactive since 1909. 35 m (115 ft) round brick and stone tower. Original lantern replaced by a round euqipment room carrying a microwave communications antenna. Tower painted white. Lantern removed. The Anke/Jens site has a good photo, Wikimedia has an excellent photo, a 2006 photo is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The building was converted to a water tower in 1950 and then to a communications tower in 1992. Located in the village of Schiermonnikoog. Island accessible by passenger ferry from Lauwersoog on the mainland; special permission is needed to bring cars to the island. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS NET-022.

Schiermonnikoog Light, Schiermonnikoog, May 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Peter Voerman

Rottumeroog Lighthouse
Emder Kaap (Rottumeroog)
1947 (tower built 1883). Inactive since 1956. Approx. 15 m (49 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower, painted black. K-J Skiskien has a good photo, Henk Postma has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. This Quirinus Harder design was also used for the Kaap Oosterend beacon on Texel (see above). A lantern was placed on the tower in 1947, but in 1956 the lantern was moved to the Schilbolsnol lighthouse, also on Texel. In 1989 the beacon was disassembled for restoration; it was reassembled in 1990. In 1999 it was moved south 400 m (1/4 mi) to escape accelerating beach erosion. Rottumeroog is the easternmost Dutch island of Friesland; the beacon helps guide vessels approaching the Ems estuary, which is the border with Germany. Note: Lighthouse Explorer's photo does not show the lighthouse. Located on western end of the island. Accessible only by boat, and the island is closed to the general public. Site and tower closed. ARLHS NET-196.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Delfzijl (1889-1981), Eems (Ems) River. Huelse has images of the original and 1949 lighthouses. Reported demolished to make way for port buildings. ARLHS NET-004.
  • Edam (?-?), Edam. The engraving is from 1802.
  • Egmond Zuidtoren (1834-1891), Central Coast. ARLHS NET-163.
  • Fort Kijkduin (1822-1877), near Den Helder. Replaced by the Lange Jaap lighthouse. ARLHS NET-165.
  • Hollum (1891-?), Ameland. ARLHS NET-193.
  • Petten (ca. 1600-1800), Noord Holland.
  • Schokland Zuidpunt (4) (1856-1944), Noordoostpolder. Destroyed during World War II and not replaced, since it had become obsolete. Forand has a postcard view of the second lighthouse as it looked about 1800, and there's a photo of the foundation stones of the third (1825) lighthouse. ARLHS NET-175.
  • Watum (1888-1945), Ems Estuary. A photo is available (second photo of the set), and Wikipedia has a brief article on the lighthouse. ARLHS NET-178.
  • Zanddijk Range Rear (1871-?), near Huisduinen. ARLHS NET-203.
  • Zandvoort (2) (early 1800s-1907), southernmost town of Noord Holland. The lantern of this lighthouse is reported to be on display at the Zandvoort museum. There was also an earlier lighthouse here, built in 1617. Photos of a lighthouse or vuurtoren at Zandvoort are common online, but this tower is a water tower, not a lighthouse.

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: East: Borkum to Wilhelmshaven | South: Southern Netherlands

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index | Ratings key

Posted January 23, 2005. Checked and revised November 28, 2014. Lighthouses: 45; lightships: 6. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.