Lighthouses of the Southern Netherlands

A small country with a long maritime tradition, The Netherlands is home to a large number of historic lighthouses. For centuries, fires were lit atop brick towers to guide returning Dutch sailors, and even today the traditional Dutch word for a lighthouse is vuurtoren (fire tower). (The Dutch word lichthuis, though often translated "lighthouse," actually means a lantern room.)

This page includes lighthouses of the southern part of the country, including the provinces of Zeeland, Noord Brabant, and Zuid Holland (South Holland). This region includes the mouths of the great rivers of northwestern Europe: the Schelde, Maas (Meuse), and Rhine. It also includes Rotterdam, the largest port in Europe and second largest city of the Netherlands.

There is strong interest in the country in lighthouses and their preservation, and many towers have been restored in recent years.

Lighthouses in the Netherlands are maintained by the Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment. In recent years there has been a movement to transfer some of the historic towers to the ownership of municipal authorities.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. NL numbers are from the official Dutch list as listed on the former Vuurtorens in Nederland web site. U.K. Admiralty numbers are from volume B of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 114.


West Schouwen Light, Haamstede, June 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Ralf Schulze

General Sources
Nederlandse Vuurtoren Vereniging
Web site of the Dutch Lighthouse Association.
Online List of Lights - Netherlands
Photos posted by Alexander Trabas.
Leuchttürmseiten von Anke und Jens - Netherlands
This site has photos and information on many of the lights.
Leuchttürme.net - Niederland
Photos and text posted by Malte Werning.
Lighthouses in Netherlands
Excellent aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lighthouses of the Netherlands
Excellent photos by Marc de Kleijn, including larger versions of his photos shown on this page.
Nederlandse Vuurtorens
An extensive photo collection by Dennis Nijhuis.
Picture Gallery of Lighthouses from the Netherlands
Photos posted by Jan Langenberg.
Majáky - Holandsko
Photos by Anna Jenšíková.
Phares d'Europe
Photos posted by Alain Guyomard and Robert Carceller, including about 20 Dutch (Pays-Bas) lighthouses.
Lighthouses in the Netherlands
Photos available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Netherlands
Photos by various photographers available on Lightphotos.net.
Netherlands Lighthouses
Historic postcard views posted by Michel Forand.
Holländische Leuchttürme auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.
Lightships in the Netherlands
The Netherlands page of Iris Klempau's comprehensive site on world lightships.
Vuurtoren Noordwijk
Noordwijk aan Zee Light, Noordwijk aan Zee, March 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Dave H

Lighthouses of Zeeland (Zealand)

Sluis Lighthouses
* Nieuwe Sluis (Breskens) (Range Rear)
1868 (Quirinius Harder). Inactive since 2011. 22 m (72 ft) octagonal cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands; lantern is black with a white roof. Marc Ryckaert's photo is at right, Cees Wouda has a good photo, Werning has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a postcard photo from the 1960s, and Google has a satellite view. Prefabricated by L.I. Enthoven & Co. of Den Haag, it served as the rear light of a range for many years. The former front range light (next entry) has been relocated to Breskens. Painted with camouflage patterns during World War II, it survived Allied bombing runs. The lighthouse was listed as a national monument in 1982. It was deactivated in October 2011. Located atop the dike at the end of the Panoramaweg in Nieuwe Sluis, west of Breskens, marking the southern entrance to the Westerschelde estuary. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-018; ex-NL-0046; ex-Admiralty B0166.1; ex-NGA 9120.
* Nieuwe Sluis (Breskens) Range Front (relocated)
1868(?). Inactive. Approx. 10 m (33 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted black; lantern roof painted white. Werning has a great photo, a 2011 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. The lighthouse is on display in Breskens at the entrance to the Fishery Museum. Located on the Grote Kade in downtown Breskens. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Visserij Museum Breskens. ARLHS NET-183M.

Terneuzen Lighthouses
* Nieuw Neuzenpolder (Outer Dyke) Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white light, 4 s on, 1 s off. 13 m (43 ft) square skeletal tower, painted with green and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The front light is on a short post. Located beside the Nieuw Neuzenweg on the south side of the Westerschelde just west of the Westerschelde Tunnel. Site open, tower closed. NL-0128; Admiralty B0236.1; NGA 9252.
* Terneuzen Veerhaven
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); red, white, or green light depending on direction, 3 s on, 2 s off. 10 m (33 ft) slender round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted with black and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a good photo by Capt. Peter Mosselberger, the Vuurtorens in Nederland site also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the west jetty of the Veerhaven in Terneuzen. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-121; NL-0152; Admiralty B0244; NGA 9280.
Nieuwe Sluis Light
Nieuwe Sluis Light, Breskens, October 2010
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Marc Ryckaert

Hulst Lightship
Lichtschip 9 Terschellingerbank
1933. Decommissioned 1979. 42.6 m (140 ft) steel lightship. Frank Behrends has a closeup photo, Lightphotos.net also has a photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view of the ship in service, and Bing has a satellite view. Built at the royal Willemsoord dockyard in Den Helder, this ship served its entire career on the Terschellingerbank station off the island of Terschelling. The ship was sunk by a British air raid during World War II, but it was raised and repaired and returned to service in 1948. After decommissioning, the light tower was removed; it has been on display ever since at the yacht harbor in Monnickendam, north of Amsterdam (see the Northern Netherlands page). The hull has been moored in the harbor at Walsoorden, on the south side of the Westerschelde about 25 km (15 mi) northeast of Terneuzen. In 2003, Iris Klempau found the ship "all alone" as if abandoned. Information is needed on its current ownership. Site status unknown. ARLHS NET-023.

Reimerswaal Lighthouse
* Hansweert (1) (relocated)
1914. Inactive since 1992. 8 m (26 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted red with a white horizontal band. Julius DeKeuning has a closeup photo, the Vuurtorens in Nederland site has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. This light originally stood on the west side of the Zuid-Beveland Canal in Hansweert, a town on the north side of the Westerschelde about 15 km (9 mi) southeast of Goes. The light marked the lock entrance. Disassembled in 1992 when it was replaced by a modern light, the light was rebuilt the following year in a traffic roundabout on the Kanaalweg, not far from the original location. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS NET-089.

Borsele Lighthouse
* [Hoedekenskerke]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6 m (20 ft); white, red or green light, depending on direction, occulting once every 9 s. 5 m (17 ft) square cylindrical brick tower, painted red with one white horizontal band. Trabas has a closeup photo, Annalies Vink has a photo, Jan Capello also has a photo, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Located on the bend of a breakwater sheltering a small boat harbor at Hoedekenskerke. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: unknown. NL-0168; Admiralty B0268.

Vlissingen Lighthouse
* Vlissingen
1891. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white, red or green light, depending on direction, 1.5 s on, 1.5 s off. 11 m (36 ft) pentagonal pyramidal cast iron tower with lantern and gallery. Entire structure painted bright red. Trabas has a good closeup photo, Werning's photo is at right, another closeup is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has another historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The pentagonal form of this lighthouse is unusual; in addition, its light displays no less than 14 sectors. Located on the west mole, marking the entrance to the old commercial harbor (Koopmanshaven) of Vlissingen (Flushing). Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-073; NL-0072; Admiralty B0200; NGA 9168.

Vlissingen Light, Vlissingen
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission

Veere Lighthouses
* Kaapduinen Range Rear (2)
1951 (station established 1866). Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); white light occulting once every 5 s, synchronized with the rear light. 13 m (43 ft) square yellow brick tower with a pyramidal roof; the light is shown through a large square window near the top of the tower. Tower painted with horizontal red bands. Trabas has a good closeup photo, Werning has a fine photo, a 2011 photo is available, Wikimedia has a photo of both Kaapduinen lights, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. Located 220 m (240 yd) southeast of the front light, about 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Vlissingen. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-049; NL-0062; Admiralty B0184.1; NGA 9160.
* Kaapduinen Range Front (2)
1951 (station established 1866). Active; focal plane 26 m (85 ft); white light occulting once every 5 s, synchronized with the rear light. 14 m (46 ft) square yellow brick tower with a pyramidal roof; the light is shown through a large square window near the top of the tower. Tower painted with horizontal red bands. Trabas has a good closeup photo, Werning has a photo, Wikimedia has a photo of both Kaapduinen lights, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. This is the front light of an upstream range for ships entering the Westerschelde. Located just off the beach on the north side of the Westerschelde, about 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Vlissingen. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-048; NL-0060; Admiralty B0184; NGA 9156.
* Zoutelande (Range Front) (2)
1951 (station established 1866). Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); continuous red light. 13 m (43 ft) square red brick tower with a pyramidal roof; the light is shown through a large square window near the top of the tower. Trabas has a closeup photo, Styve Reineck has a photo, Werning also has a photo, Forand has a postcard photo from the 1950s, and Bing has a satellite view. This light and the Westkapelle High Light form a downstream range for ships approaching the mouth of the Westerschelde. Located on the north shore of the Westerschelde in Zoutelande, about 8 km (5 mi) southwest of Westkapelle. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-034; NL-0056; Admiralty B0174.1; NGA 9152.
*** Westkapelle High (Walcheren) (Range Rear) (2)
1906 (station established 1818). Active; focal plane 49 m (161 ft); white flash every 3 s. 52 m (171 ft) tower, including approx. 12 m (39 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery atop a 40 m (131 ft) square brick church tower. Church tower unpainted; cast iron tower painted bright red; lantern dome is unpainted metallic green. 3rd order Fresnel lens (1951) in use. Marc Ryckaert's photo is at right, Trabas has a great closeup photo by Joke Reijnen, Werning has a good photo, Wikimedia has many photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a postcard photo from 1952, and Google has a good satellite view. The church tower was built between about 1458 and 1470. The Noorderhooft and Zoutelande towers are placed so that they work with the high light as ranges. The church, except for the tower, burned in 1831, and since then the tower has served solely as a lighthouse. Huelse also has a view of the tower as it appeared before 1906. Listed as a national historic landmark in 1966. The cast iron light tower was restored in 2004. Located at the west end of the Zuidstraat in Westkapelle, 1.3 km (3/4 mi) southeast of the low light. Site open; the church tower is open for climbing. ARLHS NET-030; NL-0054; Admiralty B0174; NGA 9144.
Westkapelle High Light
Westkapelle High Light, Westkapelle, April 2013
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Marc Ryckaert
* Noorderhoofd (Westkapelle Low) (Range Front)
1876 (Quirinius Harder). Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); red, white, or green light depending on direction, 7 s on, 3 s off. 16 m (52 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted red with a white horizontal band; lantern is white with a red dome. In Anke/Jens's June 2004 photo the lowest part of the tower is painted a darker red, but Marc de Kleijn's photo at right shows this is no longer the case. Trabas has a closeup photo by Joke Reijnen, Werning has a good photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a 1963 postcard photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Prefabricated by Nering Bögel, Deventer. This light forms a range with the high light for ships at a distance approaching the Westerschelde; the red and green sectors warn nearby ships away from shoals to the south. Located just behind the sea dike at Westkapelle, at the western tip of Walcheren, marking the northern entrance to the Westerschelde. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-031; NL-0052; Admiralty B0173.9; NGA 9140.
** Veere (1)
1847. Inactive since 1924. Approx. 18 m (56 ft) medieval stone tower with a sharply pointed roof; the light was shown from a balcony at a focal plane of 11.5 m (38 ft). Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a postcard view from 1920s, and Google has a satellite view. This tower, the Campveerse Toren, was built in the late 14th century; it is now in use as an inn and restaurant. The light guided ships on the Veerse Meer, the former channel separating Walcheren from Noord Beveland; this channel is now closed at both ends to form a brackish lake. In front of the building is the active light (focal plane 9 m (30 ft); flash every 6 s, white, red or green depending on direction) on a 7 m (23 ft) mast atop a small equipment enclosure. Located at the entrance to the small boat harbor in Veere, near the northern end of the Walcheren Kanal. Site open, tower open to guests of the inn. Owner/site manager: De Campveerse Toren. ARLHS NET-200; NL-0620.

Schouwen-Duiveland Lighthouses
Note: Formerly two islands, Schouwen-Duiveland is one of the large islands in the delta of the Maas and Rhine rivers, lying between the Oosterschelde on the south and the Grevelingen on the north.
* [West Schouwen lantern]
Date unknown. 6 m (20 ft) round lantern, somewhat modified but at least the dome appears original. Lantern painted white with a red dome. This lantern was removed from the West Schouwen Light in 1979 and relocated to Burghsluis, where it is on display at the harbormaster's office. A photo and a second photo are available, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the waterfront of Burghsluis, a town on the north side of the Oosterschelde about 6 km (4 mi) southeast of the lighthouse. Site open; lantern may also be open. Owner/site manager: unknown.

Noorderhoofd Light, Westkapelle, January 2006
photo copyright Marc de Kleijn; used by permission
* West Schouwen (Haamstede)
1840. Active; focal plane 57 m (187 ft); three white flashes every 15 s, the first two separated by 2.4 s and the others by 6 s. 50 m (164 ft) round brick tower with lantern and gallery, painted in a red and white spiral ("barber pole") pattern; watch room, lantern, and gallery painted red. 2nd order Fresnel lens in use. Ralf Schulze's photo appears at the top of the page, Trabas also has a closeup photo, Werning has a photo, another nice photo is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. We are fortunate that this classic lighthouse escaped destruction during World War II. The lantern was replaced in 1979, and the old lantern is now on display at the harbormaster's office in Burghsluis. Located in the village of Nieuw Haamstede near the westernmost point of Schouwen-Duiveland. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-029; NL-0324; Admiralty B0500; NGA 9576.
* Verklikker (2)
1945 (station established 1912). Inactive since about 1990. 4 m (13 ft) round cylindrical white concrete tower with what appears to be a brick section at the top. A distant photo is available, Vincent Corjanus has a fuzzy photo, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. Forand has a postcard view of the original lighthouse. Located in a dune field just north of Nieuw Haamstede. Site open (but may be difficult to find in the dunes), tower closed. ARLHS NET-201; ex-Admiralty B0502.

Lighthouses of Noord Brabant (North Brabant)

Moerdijk Lighthouse
* Willemstad (2)
1947 (station established 1820). Inactive since 1989. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, unpainted; lantern painted yellow with a red conical roof. John Caddell has photos, Werning's photo is at right, the Anke/Jens site has a nice closeup photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Huelse also has a postcard view of the original lighthouse, an interesting pentagonal cast iron skeletal tower; Forand has another postcard view. The old tower was destroyed during World War II. The present lighthouse houses a small museum. Located on the Lantaarndijk on the waterfront of Willemstad, overlooking the Hollands Diep, a segment of the lower Maas east of the junction of the Haringvliet and Brouwershaven, the estuaries north and south of Goeree-Overflakkee; Willemstad is off exit 23 of the A29 freeway south of Rotterdam. Site open, museum hours not known. ARLHS NET-075; ex-Admiralty B0577.
Vuurtoren Willemstad
Willemstad Light, Willemstad
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission

Lighthouses of Zuid Holland (South Holland)

Goedereede Lighthouses
* Westhoofd (Ouddorp) (3)
1950 (G. Friedhoff). Station established 1862. Active; focal plane 56 m (184 ft); three white flashes, separated by 2.8 s, every 15 s. 52 m (170 ft) square red brick tower with gallery, topped by an octagonal watch room, lantern, and second gallery. 2nd order Fresnel lens in use. Sylvia Fase's photo is at right, Trabas has a closeup photo, another good photo is available, and Google has a fine satellite view. Huelse has postcard views of the original lighthouse and the 1912 lighthouse. The latter was destroyed in 1945, late in World War II. Located near Ouddorp at the western end of Goeree-Overflakkee, an island formed when two smaller islands were joined by reclaimed land. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-074; NL-0692; Admiralty B0518; NGA 9600.
* Goedereede
1552. Inactive since 1924. 39.5 m (130 ft) square brick church tower. Werning has a nice photo, Forand has a 1912 postcard view, Huelse also has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Fires were lit atop the tower from at least 1552. In 1834 a 2nd order lantern and lens were placed atop the tower, and in 1879 these were upgraded to 1st order equipment. However, this location was too far from the sea, so in 1912 the lantern and lens were moved 8 km (5 mi) west to the second Westhoofd (Ouddorp) lighthouse. A weaker light was maintained on the church tower until 1924. The church is considered an architectural monument. Located in the center of Goedereede, just off the N57 coastal highway. Site open, tower status unknown. ARLHS NET-039.
Goeree Light Platform (Lichtplatform Goeree)
1971 (lightship station established 1946). Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); four quick white flashes, separated by 3.2 s, every 20 s. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) square cylindrical steel tower with lantern and gallery at one corner of a square 1-story crew quarters topped by a helipad, all supported on 4 large cylindrical piles. Light tower painted in a red and white checkerboard pattern; pilings and crew quarters painted red. Fog horn (4 blasts every 30 s). Trabas has a photo. Located in the North Sea about 18 km (11 mi) northwest of the Westhoofd Light, Goeree. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS NET-040; NL-7375; Admiralty B0630; NGA 9636.

Strijen Lighthouse
* Strijensas
1897 (A.C. van Loo). Inactive since 1996. 11 m (36 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Skeletal tower painted black, lantern yellow with a red dome. Werning has a photo showing the lighthouse recently repainted and apparently in good condition, the Anke/Jens site has a good photo taken from a nearby marina, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on the west side of the entrance to a canal, on the north side of Hollands Diep at Strijensas, about 16 km (10 mi) southwest of Dordrecht. Accessible by a short walk from a parking area at the foot of the Buitendijk in Strijensas. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS NET-072.
Vuurtoren Westhoofd
Westhoofd Light, Ouddorp, January 2011
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Sylvia Fase

Korendijk Lighthouses
Nieuwendijk Range Rear
About 1905. Active; focal plane 12 m (40 ft); continuous white light. 9.5 m (31 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Skeletal tower painted black, lantern yellow with a red dome. Trabas has a photo, Werning has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. The Nieuwendijk range guides ships sailing downstream (west) into the Vuile Gat channel north of the large island of Tiengemeten in the middle of the Haringvliet (lower Maas). Located on a dike a few feet from the ferry dock at Nieuwendijk. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-185; NL-0745.5; Admiralty B0560.1.
Nieuwendijk Range Front
About 1905. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); directional light, white, red or green depending on direction, 3 s on, 3 s off. 7.5 m (25 ft) hexagonal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Skeletal tower painted black, lantern yellow with a red dome. Trabas has a photo, Werning has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the dike on the north side of the Haringvliet about 500 m (0.4 mi) southeast of the ferry dock at Nieuwendijk. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-184; NL-0745; Admiralty B0560.

Hellevoetsluis Lighthouses
** Hellevoetsluis
1822. Active; focal plane 17 m (55 ft); directional light, white, red or green depending on direction, 5 s on, 5 s off. 18 m (59 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern dome painted red. Jacob Johan's photo is at right, Trabas has a good photo, Werning has a nice photo, a good 2007 photo is available, Wikimedia has a photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a 1940s postcard photo, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was partially rebuilt in 1901. More recently, it was restored in 1965 and there was a new restoration in 2004-05. After completion of the restoration, management of the tower was transferred to the municipality of Hellevoetsluis. Located on the west side of the entrance to the commercial harbor of Hellevoetsluis, on the north side of the Haringvliet. Site open, tower open on certain Sundays during the summer; inquire locally for the schedule. ARLHS NET-042; NL-0728; Admiralty B0536; NGA 9624.
*** Lichtschip 12 Noord-Hinder
1963. Decommissioned 1994. 45.4 m (149 ft) double-masted steel lightship; square pyramidal light tower with lantern and gallery amidships. Entire vessel painted red. Arij van Waart has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. This was the last lightship built in the Netherlands, and the last one to be in service. The ship was converted to automatic unstaffed operation in 1980. In 1997 the ship was donated to the town of Hellevoetsluis as a maritime museum. The ship is operational; it sailed to Amsterdam for a tall ships festival in 2005. Moored in the harbor at Hellevoetsluis, close to the lighthouse. Site open, ship open for tours daily except Mondays in July and August, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday in May and June, Tuesday and Thursday only the rest of the year. Site manager: Museumlichtschip Noord-Hinder. ARLHS NET-015.

Brielle Lighthouses
**** Brielle (Stenen Baken)
1630. Inactive since 1795. 15 m (50 ft) square brick tower. The Anke/Jens site has a photo, Wikimedia has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The tower was used mostly as a daybeacon, but fires were also lit at the top when ships were expected. From 1759 to 1795 the tower was used as the front light of a range with a rear light on the tower of St. Catharijne-Kerk in Brielle. The tower was battered by World War II but was restored in 1968; it is now a historical monument and tourist attraction. It is known locally as the Stenen Baken, which simply means Brick Beacon. Located on the south bank of the Maas about 3 km (2 mi) northwest of Brielle. Site open, tower open afternoons except Monday, April 1 through October 31. Site manager: Historisch Museum den Briel. ARLHS NET-071.

Vuurtoren Hellevoetsluis
Hellevoetsluis Light, Hellevoetsluis, October 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Jacob Johan

* Brielle (Sint Catharijne-Kerk)
1759. Inactive since 1850. 57 m (187 ft) square Gothic church tower. Werning has a photo, and Google has a great satellite view. The foundation of this famous church was laid early in the 15th century, and its soaring tower is visible for many miles. From 1759 to 1795 the light on the tower was the rear light of a range with the front light on the Stenen Baken. The lantern remained until it was removed in a late-1890s restoration of the church; Johan Been has a historic photo (click on "2" for a description in Dutch). Located in downtown Brielle. Site open, tower closed.

Rotterdam Lighthouses
* Maasvlakte
1974. Inactive since 2008. 66 m (203 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and double gallery, topped by a rotating radar antenna. 3rd order Fresnel lens transferred from Hoek van Holland High Light. Tower painted with black and white horizontal bands. De Kleijn's photo is at right, Werning has a good photo, another fine photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This is the tallest Dutch lighthouse and the second tallest concrete lighthouse in the world. The light was deactivated in October 2008, because changes in the harbor had reduced its usefulness. However, the radar antenna remains in service. Located at Maasvlakte just behind the dunes and sea dike protecting Europoort, the modern harbor constructed on the south side of the mouth of the Maas, west of Rotterdam. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-055; ex-NL-0986; ex-Admiralty B0633; ex-NGA 9640.
Maasmond Zuiderdam (Maasmond South Mole)
1970s. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); continuous green light. 31 m (102 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower topped by a square equipment room and helipad. Tower painted with green and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo, Werning also has a photo, and a Google satellite view shows us the helipad. This light and its companion (next entry) are popularly called De Paddestoelen (the mushrooms); together they flank the entrance to the Rotterdamsche Waterweg, the commercial mouth of the Maas. Located at the end of the breakwater on the south side of the entrance. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS NET-078; NL-0994; Admiralty B0635; NGA 9644.
Maasmond Noorderdam (Maasmond North Mole) (3)
1970s (station established 1866). Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); continuous red light. 31 m (102 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower topped by a square equipment room and helipad. Tower painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo; a Google satellite view shows us the helipad and the shadow of the lighthouse. This light and its companion (previous entry) are popularly called De Paddestoelen (the mushrooms); together they flank the entrance to the Rotterdamsche Waterweg, the commercial mouth of the Maas. In 1907, the SS Berlin wrecked at the lighthouse; Lighthouse Explorer has a photo of that wreck that also shows the second lighthouse. At some later time, the SS Amsterdam grounded next to the lighthouse. The lower portion of the tower was encased in concrete to guard against such accidents, and it came into play when the SS Spanker crashed into the pier in 1954. Located at the end of the breakwater on the north side of the entrance. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS NET-057; NL-0992; Admiralty B0634; NGA 9648.

Maasvlakte Light, Rotterdam, July 2005
photo copyright Marc de Kleijn; used by permission
Maasmond Low (Maasmond Range Front)
1971. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 28 m (92 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a square lantern room displaying a 3x3 array of lights. Tower painted with black and white horizontal bands. Trabas has Joke Reijnen's photo, Werning has a photo, and Google has a good satellite view. Located at the west end of the Middle Pier, a long mole dividing the Rotterdamsche Waterweg from the Calandkanaal. Accessible only by boat; there are distant views from Hoek van Holland and from the end of the N15 highway in Europoort. Site and tower closed. ARLHS NET-053; NL-0988; Admiralty B0637; NGA 9656.
Maasmond High (Maasmond Range Rear)
1971. Active; focal plane 47 m (154 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 45 m (148 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a square lantern room displaying a 3x3 array of lights. Tower painted with black and white horizontal bands. Trabas has Heike and Friedrich Klatt's photo, Werning has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the Middle Pier, a long mole dividing the Rotterdamsche Waterweg from the Calandkanaal, 1135 m (0.7 mi) east southeast of the low light. Accessible only by boat; there are distant views from Hoek van Holland and from the end of the N15 highway in Europoort. Site and tower closed. ARLHS NET-054; NL-0990; Admiralty B0637.1; NGA 9660.
* Calandkanaal (Europoort) Low (Range Front)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); green light, synchronized with the rear light, 4 s on, 2 s off. 26 m (85 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a square lantern room displaying a 3x3 array of lights. Tower painted with red and white horizontal bands. Werning's photo is at right, Trabas has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. The Calandkanaal is a dredged waterway bringing vessels to the Europoort, one of the world's busiest ports. Located near the end of a long peninsula between the Rotterdamsche Waterweg and the Calandkanaal. Accessible by car. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-150; NL-1000; Admiralty B0642; NGA 9672.
* Calandkanaal (Europoort) High (Range Rear)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 43 m (141 ft); green light, synchronized with the rear light, 4 s on, 2 s off. 40 m (131 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a square lantern room displaying a 3x3 array of lights. Tower painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a closeup photo, Werning has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located near the end of a long peninsula between the Rotterdamsche Waterweg and the Calandkanaal, 550 m (1/3 mi) east southeast of the low light. Accessible by car. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-151; NL-1002; Admiralty B0642.1; NGA 9676.

Calandkanaal Low Light, Rotterdam
photo copyright Malte Werning; used by permission
* Berghaven Range Rear (Hooghe Lichtopstand)
1900. Inactive since 1967. 11 m (36 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Skeletal tower painted black, lantern white with a red roof. Werning has a photo, Yvonne Spayn has a good photo, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse was the rear light of a downstream (westbound) range guiding ships leaving Rotterdam. In 1976 the inactive lighthouse was relocated to the town of Kijkduin near The Hague, where it stood on the town square as a tourist attraction. By 2003 it was in poor condition and the Kijkduin government announced that it would be demolished and replaced. Residents of Hoek van Holland then asked to get their lighthouse back, and on 18 February 2004 a Netherlands Air Force Chinook helicopter lifted the 8500 kg (9 ton) tower in one piece and returned it to a site at or near its original location in Hoek van Holland. François Mique has a photo of the lighthouse en route. The lighthouse has since been restored. It was to be open for climbing, but we do not know if this has occurred. A replica of the lighthouse has been built in Kijkduin (see below). Located in Hoek van Holland in a park near the ferry terminal. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-182.
* Hoek van Holland Range Front (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 29 m (95 ft); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 27 m (89 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a square lantern room displaying a 3x3 array of lights. Tower painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo by Joke Reijnen, Werning has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the foot of Harwichweg, on the north side of the Rotterdamsche Waterweg at the ferry terminal where Stena Line ferries arrive from England; there's a photo of a ferry moored beside the lighthouse. Accessible by car. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-044; NL-0996; Admiralty B0638; NGA 9664.
* Hoek van Holland Range Rear (2)
1974(?) (station established 1893). Active; focal plane 44 m (144 ft); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off, synchronized with the rear light. 43 m (141 ft) octagonal cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a square lantern room displaying a 3x3 array of lights. Tower painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a photo by Klaus Kern showing both this light and the old Hoek van Holland Light (next entry), a similar photo is also available, Werning has a good photo, and Bing has a good satellite view. Located near the old Hoek van Holland Light on the north side of the Rotterdamsche Waterweg, 450 m (1/4 mi) east southeast of the low light. Accessible by car. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-141; NL-0998; Admiralty B0638.1; NGA 9668.
** Hoek van Holland High (Range Rear) (1)
1893 (A.C. van Loo). Inactive since 1974. 21 m (69 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted red; watch room below the lantern is painted white. Original 3rd order Fresnel lens transferred to Maasvlakte Light. Prefabricated in Dordrecht by Penn & Bauduin. Uwe Koch's photo is at right, Werning has a photo, the Anke/Jens site has a good photo, Wikimedia has good photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a colored postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. The light was deactivated when the Maasvlakte Light was established as the landfall light for Rotterdam. The lighthouse was scheduled for demolition until a teenager named René Vas started a campaign to save it. The tower now contains a small museum, the Netherlands Coastal Lighthouse Museum. Located at Willem van Houtenstraat 102 in Hoek van Holland, just east of the modern range light and adjacent to the Stena Line ferry terminal (note the ferry in the background of Uwe Koch's photo at right). Site open, museum and tower open Saturday and Sunday afternoons, May through September. Site manager: Nederlands Kustverlichtingsmuseum. ARLHS NET-142.
* Hoek van Holland Low (Range Front) (1) (relocated)
1899 (A.C. van Loo). Inactive since 1974 (a decorative light is displayed). 13.5 m (44 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted red; lantern is painted white with a red dome. An excellent 2007 photo is available, Werning has a good photo, and Google has an aerial view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the lighthouse in its original surroundings, and Forand has 1960s postcard view. The lighthouse was prefabricated in Dordrecht by Penn & Bauduin. The light was deactivated when the construction of Europoort required new range lights for the Maasmond area. In 1977 the lighthouse was relocated to the Havenmuseum in Rotterdam; Peter Lammers has posted a historic photo of the lighthouse being removed from its former location. In 2005, residents of Hoek van Holland began a campaign to have the lighthouse returned to their town, but a May 2011 photo shows the lighthouse still at the museum. Located outside the museum at Leuvehaven 1 in downtown Rotterdam. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Het Havenmuseum. ARLHS NET-043.
Hoek van Holland Light
1893 Hoek van Holland Rear Light, Rotterdam, April 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Uwe Koch
** Trinity House Lightship 11 Breeveertien
1951. Decommissioned 1986. 41.9 m (137.5 ft) steel lightship; light displayed from a square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Entire vessel painted red. Richard Green has a good 2007 photo, a 2008 photo is available, and Google has an aerial view. Built by Philip & Son in Dartmouth, England, the ship served much of its career on the St. Gowans station off the south coast of Wales. In 1995 it was towed to Rotterdam, renamed Breeveertien, and restored as a seafood restaurant. The ship was sold in March 2007, and in November 2009 it reopened as Spanish-Portuguese restaurant called Tinto. Moored at the Maritiem Museum Rotterdam in downtown Rotterdam. Site open; as of December 2012 the restaurant was only open Friday and Saturday evenings. Owner/site manager: Restaurant Tinto. ARLHS NET-186.
 
Den Haag (The Hague) Lighthouses
*
Kijkduin (Hooghe Lichtopstand replica)
2004 replica of 1900 lighthouse. Inactive. 11 m (36 ft) hexagonal pyramidal skeletal tower with lantern and gallery. Skeletal tower painted black, lantern white with a red roof. Jackie Kever has a photo, Dennis Holtkamp has another photo, and Google has a fine satellite view. The original Berghaven Range Rear Light (see above) was called the Hooghe Lichtopstand during the 30 years (1974-2004) it stood in the town square of Kijkduin. In February 2004, the lighthouse was returned to its original site in Hoek van Holland and replaced in Kijkduin by a replica designed by students of Mondriaan College in The Hague. Located on the waterfront in downtown Kijkduin, a seaside suburb of The Hague. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-050.
* Scheveningen Zuiderhoofd (South Mole) (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); continuous green light. 8.5 m (28 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern, painted with green and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a good closeup photo, Werning has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The original light was a spidery skeletal tower seen on the left in Huelse's postcard view. Located at the end of the south breakwater at Scheveningen; accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-064; NL-1302; Admiralty B0751.4; NGA 9772.
** Scheveningen (4)
1875 (Quirinius Harder). Station established by 1630. Active; focal plane 49 m (161 ft); two white flashes, separated by 2.3 s, every 10 s. 30 m (98 ft) dodecagonal (12-sided) cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, attached or adjacent to a 2-story keeper's house. 3rd order Fresnel lens in use. Lighthouse painted red, lantern and gallery white with a green dome. Mark Fonseca Rendeiro's photo is at right, Trabas has a great closeup photo by Klaus Kern, Werning has a photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Forand has a 1949 postcard photo, and Google has a good satellite view. One of the world's greatest iron lighthouses, this classic Dutch tower was prefabricated by Nering Bögel of Deventer. The historic light station is now managed by the Scheveningen Museum, which has a web page for the lighthouse. Another page on the history of the lighthouse has photos of the 1840 and 1855 lighthouses. Located at the harbor of Scheveningen, a historic port which is now the oceanfront neighborhood of The Hague, the capital of the Netherlands. Site open, tower open to guided tours Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; group tours can be arranged on other days. Site manager: Muzee Scheveningen. ARLHS NET-020; NL-1292; Admiralty B0750; NGA 9748.
* Scheveningen Noorderhoofd (North Mole) (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); continuous red light. 8.5 m (28 ft) hexagonal cylindrical concrete tower with lantern, painted with red and white horizontal bands. Trabas has a good closeup photo by Klaus Kern, Werning also has a closeup, and Google has a satellite view. The entrance between the two moles is quite narrow; the Anke/Jens site has a good photo showing both towers. The original light was a spidery skeletal tower seen in Forand's 1926 postcard view and on the right in Huelse's postcard view. Located at the end of the north breakwater at Scheveningen; accessible by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-062; NL-1300; Admiralty B0751.6; NGA 9768.

Scheveningen Light, Den Haag, September 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Mark Fonseca Rendeiro
*** Van der Valk Pier Scheveningen (Wandelpier, Promenade Pier) (2)
1961(?) (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 44 m (146 ft); white light, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off. 33 m (108 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower supporting an enclosed observation deck. Access to the observation deck is by an external spiral stairway. Entire structure is white. Trabas has a photo, Ralf Steib has a photo of bungee jumpers at the tower, and Google has a satellite view. The original pier, built in 1901, burned accidentally in 1943. The current pier was completed in 1961. Another fire damaged the pier in September 2011, but two of its restaurants have reopened. Located at the end of the pier, about 4 km (2.5 mi) north of the harbor lights. Site and tower open. Owner/site manager: Van der Valk Pier Scheveningen. ARLHS NET-063; NL-1322; Admiralty B0755; NGA 9782.

Katwijk Lighthouse
**** Katwijk
1605. Inactive since 1913. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) square cylindrical brick tower, painted white. A lens and lantern were installed atop the tower in the early 19th century. A photo is at right, Werning has an excellent photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The tower was restored in 1901, but the light was deactivated only 12 years later. In 1968, the tower was opened to the public as a historic site, and in 1971 it was declared a national monument. The building was restored in 1989. In 2005, for the 400th anniversary of the lighthouse, it was wrapped with a large mural of seagulls in flight, as shown in a July 2005 closeup photo. This covering was removed and the tower was repainted white after the end of the year, as an October 2006 photo shows. Located just off the seaside Zuidkant Boulevard at Secretaris Varkevissarstraat in Katwijk aan Zee. Site open, tower open daily except Sundays during the summer months. Site manager: Katwijks Museum. ARLHS NET-013.

Noordwijk Lighthouse
* Noordwijk aan Zee (2)
1923 (C. Jelsma). Station established 1854. Active; focal plane 33 m (108 ft); white light, three occultations (2 s each) every 20 s. 26 m (84 ft) square brick and concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. The tower has an observation level with a bay window about 2/3 of the way up. A photo is at the top of this page, Trabas has a photo by Joke Reijnen, Werning has an excellent photo, Diego Cantalapiedra has another good photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Lighthouses are reported in Noordwijk as early as 1644, but little is known of their history. This lighthouse was restored in 2004. At the holiday season, a light show illuminates the entire tower. Located on the Vuurtorenplein in Noordwijk aan Zee about 16 km (10 mi) northwest of Leiden. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS NET-019; NL-1324; Admiralty B0760; NGA 9784.
Vuurtoren Katwijk
Katwijk Light, Katwijk aan Zee, May 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Christiane

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Adjoining pages: North: Northern Netherlands | South: Belgium

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Posted January 23, 2005. Checked and revised December 3, 2013. Lighthouses: 44; lightships: 3. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.