Lighthouses of the United States: Upstate New York

Rich in waterways, the U.S. state of New York is equally rich in lighthouses. This page includes the lighthouses of upstate New York, including Lakes Erie and Ontario, the St. Lawrence River, Lake Champlain, and the state's inland waterways system. Another page, for downstate New York, includes lighthouses of the Atlantic Ocean, Long Island Sound, the New York City area, and the Hudson River.

Although there is no state lighthouse preservation society in New York, there are many regional and local preservation groups. Upstate, lighthouse preservation efforts are particularly strong at Buffalo and at several locations on Lakes Ontario and Erie. The lighthouses of Lake Champlain and the St. Lawrence River, however, are less well known and somewhat neglected; many of them are in private hands.

Navigational aids in the United States are operated by the U.S. Coast Guard, but ownership (and sometimes operation) of historic lighthouses has been transferred to local authorities and preservation organizations in many cases. Lighthouses on Lakes Erie and Ontario are operated by the Coast Guard Ninth District in Cleveland, Ohio; those on the St. Lawrence River and Lake Champlain are operated by the Coast Guard First District in Boston, Massachusetts.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. USCG numbers for Lake Champlain lighthouses are from Volume I of the USCG Light List; for the St. Lawrence River and Lakes Erie and Ontario the numbers are from Volume VII.

General Sources
New York Lighthouses
Photos, travel directions, and historical accounts by Kraig Anderson.
Lighthouses of New York
Photos and accounts by Bryan Penberthy.
Lighthouses in New York
Photos available from Wikimedia.
Lighthouses in New York, United States
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lake Ontario Lighthouses and Lake Erie Lighthouses
Photos by C.W. Bash.
Lighthouses of Lake Ontario and Lighthouses of Lake Erie
Part of William Britten's Lighthouse Getaway site. Photos and brief accounts of more than a dozen lighthouses.
Lake Erie Lighthouses
Excellent photos by Karl Josker.
National Maritime Inventory - New York
Inventory of New York lighthouse data.
Coast Guard Lighthouses - New York
Historic photos and notes posted by the U.S. Coast Guard Historian's office.
Leuchttürme USA auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images of U.S. lighthouses posted by Klaus Huelse.

Sodus Bay Light
Sodus Bay Light, Sodus Point, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Corey Seeman


Oswego Harbor West Pierhead Light, Oswego, September 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Andrea

Lake Erie Lighthouses

Chautauqua County Lighthouses
* Barcelona (Portland Harbor)
1829. Inactive since 1859 (a decorative natural gas "streetlight" has been displayed since 1962). 40 ft (12 m) unpainted old-style round fieldstone tower. The original lantern was removed long ago; an open "lantern" platform was added in 1962. Jarrod Will has a closeup photo, Ivan Monterrey has a photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. The original 1-1/2 story fieldstone keeper's house, modified in the 1890s, is a private residence owned for more than 120 years by the Patterson family. It was renovated by Ann and Bruce Mulkin after they bought the property from the Pattersons in 1998. In April 2005, the Mulkins put the property up for sale for $999,000. Lighthouse Digest has a 1999 article on the history of the light station, which was the first in the country to be lit with natural gas (1831). Located on Lake Street (NY 5) at Barcelona harbor, off I-90 at the Westfield exit. Site and tower closed, but there is public parking at the harbor access area adjacent to the tower. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-038.
**** Dunkirk (Point Gratiot) (3)
1875 (station estalished 1827). Active; focal plane 82 ft (25 m); white light occulting every 4 s. 61 ft (18.5 m) square cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story brick Victorian keeper's house; the tower's brick veneer surrounds an 1857 rubblestone tower. Original 3rd order Fresnel lens (1857). Upper 2/3 of tower painted white; lower 1/3 unpainted gray stone. Lantern painted red. The keeper's house is now a museum. Original oil house and other buildings. NOAA C-MAN automatic weather station. Bash's photo is at right, Anderson's page has nice photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has an aerial view. Displays on site include the next three lighthouses listed, various buoys, and a buoy tender. At the light's 125th anniversary celebration, in July 2000, ownership of the tower was transferred to the local preservation society. In the summer of 2010, storm waves exposed the foundations of the 1827 lighthouse. Located on Lighthouse Point Road, off NY 5 in Dunkirk. Site open; museum and tower open daily except Wednesday May through August and Thursday through Sunday in September and October. Owner/site manager: Dunkirk Lighthouse and Veterans Park Museum. ARLHS USA-248; USCG 7-3410.
* Buffalo Harbor South Entrance North Side
1903. Inactive since 1988. 29 ft (9 m) "bottle" or "bubble" shaped cast iron tower, sibling of Buffalo North Breakwater. Relocated for display at the entrance to the Dunkirk Lighthouse Museum. Jarrod Will has a closeup photo, Britten also has a closeup photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. Site open, museum open daily except Sunday and Wednesday May through October. Owner/site manager: Dunkirk Lighthouse and Veterans Park Museum. ARLHS USA-1310.
* Dunkirk Pierhead (2)
1939. Inactive. Approx. 65 ft (20 m) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with enclosed equipment room in the base. Bing has an aerial view. The tower is behind a tree in Google's street view. Relocated from the pier for display at the Dunkirk Lighthouse Museum, a short distance west of the entrance. Site open, museum open daily except Sunday and Wednesday May through October. Owner/site manager: Dunkirk Lighthouse and Veterans Park Museum. ARLHS USA-1303.
* [Grand Island Range Rear]
1917. Inactive. Approx. 30 ft (9 m) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with enclosed equipment room in the base. Robert English has a photo, and Bing has an aerial view. Relocated from Grand Island, north of Buffalo, for display northeast of the main lighthouse at the Dunkirk Lighthouse Museum. Site open, museum open daily except Sunday and Wednesday May through October. Owner/site manager: Dunkirk Lighthouse and Veterans Park Museum. ARLHS USA-1144.
Dunkirk Light
Dunkirk Light, Dunkirk, January 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo copyright C.W. Bash
[Dunkirk Pierhead (3)]
Active; focal plane 36 ft (11 m); red flash every 6 s. Round cylindrical "D9" tower, painted white with a narrow red band. This light replaced a skeletal tower (1939), now on display at Dunkirk Light. Robert English has a photo, and Bing has an aerial view. The Coast Guard has a photo of the original light, a wood tower, and Huelse has a postcard view. Located at the west end of the detached breakwater of Dunkirk harbor. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-249; USCG 7-3435.

Erie County (Buffalo Area) Lighthouses
Buffalo Harbor South Entrance (South Buffalo) (1)
1903. Inactive (since 1988?). 29 ft (9 m) round steel tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a concrete platform on the Stony Point Breakwater. The original 4th order Fresnel lens was transferred to the Buffalo Main light; in 2013 it was removed, restored, and displayed at the new Heritage Discovery Center in South Buffalo. The lighthouse has been replaced by a post light (focal plane 36 ft; white flash every 6 s) at the end of the breakwater. Josker has a remarkable closeup photo, Robert English has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has an aerial view. In 2008, this poorly-known lighthouse became available for transfer under NHLPA. The Buffalo Lighthouse Association applied for ownership, and its application was approved. In 2012, the Association was seeking $185,000 for an initial project to stabilize the lighthouse. Full restoration is estimated to cost $850,000. Located at the elbow of a breakwater marking the south side of the south entrance to Buffalo harbor, about 3 miles (5 km) south of the Buffalo light. Accessible only by boat; visible from the foot of Tifft Street off NY 5. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Buffalo Lighthouse Association. ARLHS USA-091; USCG 7-2905.
Buffalo Harbor (Outer Breakwater, North Entrance) (3)
1961 (station established 1872). Active; focal plane 71 ft (21.5 m); flash every 10 s, alternating green and white. 71 ft (21.5 m) octagonal cylindrical tower with navigation light, painted white. No lantern. Fog horn (2 blasts every 30 s) as needed. Corey Seeman's photo is at right, Josker has a good closeup photo, and Bing has an aerial view. The Coast Guard has a historic photo of the 1914 lighthouse, which was similar to the Lorain Harbor Light in Ohio. It was demolished after being severely damaged by a collision with the freighter Frontenac in 1958. Located at the south end of the outer (detached) breakwater off the mouth of the Buffalo River. Accessible only by boat. Harbor tours available. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1299; USCG 7-2680.
Buffalo Harbor Light
Buffalo Harbor Light, Buffalo, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo copyright Corey Seeman
Buffalo Intake Crib
1908. Active (maintained by the City of Buffalo); focal plane 60 ft (18 m); two white flashes every 5 s. Navigation light mounted atop a lantern at the peak of a conical structure above a circular stone crib. The crib is a water supply intake. Josker also has a fine photo, Corey Seeman has a more distant view, and Marinas.com has aerial photos, but the crib is only a faint blur in Google's satellite view. Located offshore about 350 yd (300 m) southeast of Horseshoe Reef. Accessible only by boat; visible from Buffalo Main Light. Harbor tours available. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of Buffalo. ARLHS USA-1301; USCG 7-2670.
Horseshoe Reef
1856. Inactive since 1930. Originally a square wood keeper's house with a lantern on the roof, mounted on an iron frame platform above a square stone foundation. This lighthouse was built in Canadian waters by the U.S. Lighthouse Board, but in 1913 the international border was moved 100 ft (30 m) west so that the lighthouse would be in the United States. The building has completely collapsed and vanished, leaving only the iron framework and the lantern. The Buffalo Lighthouse Association has a page for the lighthouse, Josker has a great closeup photo, and the lighthouse is faintly visible in Google's satellite view. Located on Middle Reef (actually not Horseshoe Reef) within sight of the other Buffalo lighthouses. Accessible only by boat; visible from Buffalo Main Light. Harbor tours available. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS USA-386.
* Buffalo Main (2)
1833 (station established 1818). Inactive since 1914 (since 1987 a decorative light has been displayed). 61 ft (18.5 m) octagonal limestone tower with lantern and gallery. The 3rd order Chance Brothers Fresnel lens used here in 1905-1914 and at the Outer Breakwater Light (below) in 1914-1958 is now displayed at the Buffalo History Museum. Keeper's house demolished. Doug Kerr's photo is at right, Anderson has a good page with excellent photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has an aerial view and a distant street view. A historic and beautifully restored lighthouse. In late 2007, Congress passed legislation transferring the lighthouse and 20 acres of waterfront from the Coast Guard to the city, and providing $3.1 million for development of a lakefront park. In October 2010, it was announced that the first phase of this transfer would allow the lighthouse to reopen to the public in 2012. In April 2011 a contract was awarded for $170,000 to restore the exterior stonework. In August 2013 the 4th order lens formerly mounted in the lantern was removed for restoration; it will be replaced by a new, historically-accurate 3rd order lens. Located on the South Pier Promenade at the mouth of the Buffalo River (the western end of the Erie Canal), off the Buffalo Skyway (NY 5) at Fuhrmann Boulevard. Formerly on Coast Guard property, the site was been closed to the public in recent years but it has recently reopened. Site open, tower closed. Owner: City of Buffalo. Site manager: Buffalo Lighthouse Association. ARLHS USA-090.
* Buffalo North Breakwater
1903. Inactive since 1985. Unusual design: 29 ft (9 m) "bottle" or "bubble" shaped cast iron tower, painted white. Relocated in 1985 for display near the Buffalo light, the light appears in Doug Kerr's photo at right and in C.W. Bash's photo, and Google has a satellite view. Other displays include a bell buoy from the 1920s and a fog bell. Located a few feet west of the Buffalo Main Light (previous entry). Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Buffalo Lighthouse Association. ARLHS USA-1302.
Strawberry Island Cut Lower Range Rear (4?)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 83 ft (25 m); continuous red light visible only on the range line. The tower also carries a rectangular daymark painted red with a white vertical stripe. Approx. 75 ft (23 m) square skeletal tower. No photo available, but Google has an aerial view and a street view from 2387 Niagara Street. The range guides vessels southbound in the channel east of Grand Island. Lighthouse Explorer has a photo of the original lighthouse, which was similar to the Niagara River Range Rear Light (see next entry). Located off Niagara Street between Collaton Street and Briggs Avenue in north Buffalo. Site status unknown. USCG 7-3020; ARLHS USA-1221.

Buffalo Main Light, Buffalo Harbor, October 2008
with the former North Breakwater Light at left
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Doug Kerr
Niagara River Range Rear (2) (relocated to Grand Island)
1899 (station established 1885). Inactive since 1929. 51 ft (15.5 m) white octagonal wood tower with frame lantern and gallery. Tower painted white; the lantern roof is blue with a gold ventilator ball. C.W. Bash has a photo, and Bing has an aerial view. The original location of this tower was near the intersection of Niagara Street and Busti Avenue in Buffalo. The range, which guided vessels from Lake Erie into the upper Niagara River, was deactivated after the Peace Bridge was completed in 1927. The lighthouse was sold and relocated to Grand Island in 1931 by Frank and Charles Fix, who owned the Bedell House Hotel. Later it was owned by Mike Steffen, whose property has since been purchased by the Buffalo Launch Club. For many years the lighthouse was misidentified as the Grand Island Range Front Light, and it is still listed as that light on the Lighthouse Explorer page. The club restored the lighthouse in 2004, and it is in good condition today. Located in Ferry Village at the foot of Bush Road on the Tonawanda Channel, on the southeastern side of Grand Island. Site is private, although polite visitors are usually tolerated; tower closed. Owner/site manager: Buffalo Launch Club. ARLHS USA-1047 (=1119).

Lake Ontario Lighthouses

Niagara County Lighthouses
*** Fort Niagara (3)
1872 (station established 1781). Inactive since 1993. 61 ft (18.5 m) (increased from 50 ft (15 m) in 1900) octagonal limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a limestone workroom; lantern and gallery painted black. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is mounted in the tower. The 2-story wood keeper's house is now used as a museum and gift shop. André Sá's photo is at right, Brian Piltz has a nice photo, Bash has a photo, Joseph Hollick has a view from the river entrance, Huelse has a historic postcard view, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. The first light was established in 1781 by British forces and discontinued in 1796 when the fort was ceded to the U.S. The American light station was established in 1823. The current lighthouse has an unusual design, which may be patterned after the much older Buffalo Main Light. The lighthouse was deactivated in 1993 because trees blocked boaters' view of its light. In the summer of 2013, the lighthouse was closed for two months while leaky windows were repaired or replaced. Located near the entrance of Fort Niagara State Historic Site at the mouth of the Niagara River, off NY 18F and the Robert Moses State Parkway. Site and museum open daily. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard. Site manager: Old Fort Niagara Association. ARLHS USA-294.
* Fort Niagara (4)
1993 (station established 1781). Active; focal plane 80 ft (24 m); white light occulting every 4 s. Approx. 72 ft (22 m) triangular skeletal tower. Gabriel Hsia has a photo from inside the fort, Kelly Sedinger has a photo of the lower portion (Canada's Niagara River Range Front lighthouse is across the river in the upper left corner of this photo), a view from the river entrance is available, and Bing has an aerial view. Located on the point of land at the entrance to the Niagara River, about 800 ft (250 m) west of the historic lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. USCG 7-2485.
* Olcott (replica)
2003 (replica of 1873 lighthouse). Inactive (a decorative light is displayed); station inactive since 1932. 27 ft (8 m) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern. Lighthouse painted white, lantern black. Robert English has a fine 2009 closeup, Wikimedia has several photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. The original lighthouse stood on the town's west pier. In 1930 it was replaced by a post light and relocated to the Olcott Yacht Club, where it stood until it was demolished in 1963. The lighthouse was similar to many Canadian "pepperpot" lighthouses. The replica was built by volunteers, based on photographs of the original. Located at the end of Lockport Street (extension of NY 78) in Olcott, about 12 miles (19 km) west of Thirty Mile Point. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Town of Olcott. Site manager: Olcott Beach Lighthouse Society. ARLHS USA-1050.
Fort Niagara Light
Fort Niagara Light, Youngstown, April 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by André Sá
**** Thirty Mile Point (1)
1875. Reactivated (inactive 1958-1998, now maintained by the state); focal plane 60 ft (18 m); white flash every 10 s. 61 ft (18.5 m) square cylindrical limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story limestone keeper's quarters. Lantern black with a red roof; watch room white. The brick fog signal building (1935) is used as a campground recreation area. Two oil houses and other light station buildings. Ann and Peter Macdonald's photo is at right, Penberthy has great photos, additional photos are available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. A local group, Friends of Thirty Mile Point Lighthouse, works for renovation and preservation of the light station. The keeper's house includes three apartments available for vacation rental. Located at Thirty Mile Point, off Lower Lake Road near Somerset. Site open, lighthouse and tower open for tours daily (shorter hours Monday and Tuesday). Owner: New York State Parks (Golden Hill State Park). Site manager: Friends of Thirty Mile Point Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-844; USCG 7-2395.
* Thirty Mile Point (2)
1958. Inactive since 1998. 19 m (62 ft) square skeletal tower with gallery, painted black. The light was moved to this tower in 1958, when the original lighthouse was destaffed. The tower has remained in place since the light was returned to the historic tower. Anderson has a photo, and Google has a street view. Located west of the historic lighthouse, next to the fog signal building.
Thirty Mile Point Light
Thirty Mile Point Light, Barker, March 2012
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Ann and Peter Macdonald

Orleans County Lighthouse
* Oak Orchard Harbor (replica)
2010 replica of 1871 lighthouse. Active; focal plane about 36 ft (11 m); continuous white light. 32 ft (10.5 m) square wood tower with a square lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern roof black. Anderson has a page with good photos, a 2012 photo and another photo are available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The original lighthouse was deactivated in 1905 and destroyed in December 1916 by storms that also washed out the breakwater on which it stood. The original keeper's house survives as a private residence on Archbald Road in Oak Orchard on the Lake. In 2003 the Oak Orchard Harbor Light Committee was formed to build a replica of the lighthouse, and in 2004 the state approved its plans and chartered the Oak Orchard Lighthouse Museum to operate the proposed lighthouse. Several years were needed to raise the necessary funds. A contract was awarded to Nathaniel Contractors in late 2009, the lighthouse was completed in the spring of 2010, and it was dedicated on 26 June. Located at Point Breeze, on the west side of the Oak Orchard Harbor entrance. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS USA-559; USCG 7-2391.

Monroe County (Rochester Area) Lighthouse
* Braddock Point
1899. Reactivated (inactive 1954-1996); focal plane 55 ft (17 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 50 ft (15 m) octagonal red brick tower with a modern "watch" room topped by a small cupola-style lantern. The 2-1/2 story red brick keeper's house has been a private residence since 1957. Louis Hillman's photo is at right, Robert English has a 2009 photo, the Coast Guard has a historic photo showing the original appearance of the lighthouse, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has an aerial view. Trees hide the lighthouse in Google's street view of the entrance. Originally 97 ft (30 m) tall, the tower was truncated in 1955 to about 40 ft (12 m) due to structural damage. The station was sold to Walter and Kay Stone in 1957; they were faced with repairing the damage from years of neglect and mistreatment. The second owners, Robert and Barbara Thulin, bought the station in 1986 and carried out a more complete restoration. They installed the present navigational light, which was activated on 28 February 1996. Don and Nandy Town, the current owners, purchased the property in December 2008 and have renovated the lighthouse as a bed and breakfast inn. In its original form, the lighthouse was similar to the Southeast Block Island Light in Rhode Island and to the former Cleveland Light in Ohio, and in fact the lantern and lens from Cleveland were used here until 1954. Located at Bogus Point, 3 miles (5 km) west of Braddock Point, off the Lake Ontario State Parkway at Lighthouse Road, northwest of Rochester. Site and tower closed except to guests. Owner/site manager: Braddock Point Lighthouse. ARLHS USA-075; USCG 7-2350.
Braddock Point Light
Braddock Point Light, Hilton, August 2010
photo copyright Louis Hillman; used by permission
*** Genesee (Charlotte-Genesee)
1822. Inactive since 1881 (a decorative light has been displayed since 1984); focal plane 45 ft (14 m). 40 ft (12 m) octagonal rubblestone tower with lantern and gallery; 4th order Fresnel lens on loan from the Coast Guard since 1984. Tower unpainted, lantern painted black. The 2-1/2 story red brick keeper's house (1863) now serves as the Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse Museum. The lantern room is a replica built in 1984 by students at Edison Tech High School (Huelse has a historic postcard view of the old tower without a lantern, and the Coast Guard has a historic photo). Bash's photo is at right, Anderson has an excellent page for the lighthouse, Schultheiss has photos and a history by Thomas Moriarty, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. This the oldest U.S. Lake Ontario lighthouse and an outstanding example of old-style stone construction. It is also the oldest building in Monroe County. The keeper's house remained in service for many years after the lighthouse was deactivated; even after area lights were automated it provided a residence for the local Coast Guard commander. A letter-writing campaign by high school students saved the light tower in 1965 when there was a proposal to demolish it. The property was declared surplus in 1981 and transferred to Monroe County in 1983. For many years the lighthouse carried the Fresnel lens originally installed at the Lorain Harbor Light in Ohio, but in 2007 the preservation group restoring that light demanded its return. After the lease of the lens from the Coast Guard expired in 2011, it was removed for restoration. The lens was placed on display in Lorain in early 2014. In 2012, preservationists were concerned that planned waterfront development would block the view of the lake from the lighthouse; a compromise limited the height of buildings in front of the tower. In August 2014 the lantern was removed for restoration and repair of its footings; in September a new 4th order lens bought with an anonymous donation was installed. Located on Lighthouse Street, near the Lake Avenue exit from the Lake Ontario Parkway, in the Charlotte section of Rochester. Site open (free), museum and tower open Friday through Monday afternoons May through November (donations accepted). Owner: Monroe County. Site manager: Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse Historical Society. ARLHS USA-320.

Charlotte-Genesee Light, Rochester, October 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
* [Rochester Harbor (Genesee River) West Pierhead (6)]
1995 (station established 1838). Active; focal plane 40 ft (12 m); white flash every 4 s. 35 ft (10.5 m) round cylindrical "D9" tower, painted white with a narrow red band. A 2008 closeup is available, and Google has an aerial view and a very distant street view. The original wooden light was lost in a storm in 1853; it was replaced in 1854 by another wooden light, then in in 1881 by a cast iron tower carrying the lantern and lens from the Port of Genesee Light. In 1884 that tower was relocated to the Cleveland, Ohio, West Breakwater; it was replaced by a larger cast iron tower shown in a U.S. Coast Guard photo and Huelse's postcard view. The 1884 lighthouse was replaced in 1931 by a square skeletal tower carrying a fog signal enclosure with a light on the roof; there is a 1985 photo showing this structure. The 1931 light tower is reported to have been moved to the Rochester Gas and Electric Company's Russell Station generating plant, about 2.5 km (1.5 mi) west of the pier, but we cannot confirm its presence there. (The Russell Station plant was decommissioned in 2010.) Located at the end of the breakwater off the west side of the Genesee River entrance in Rochester; visible from Ontario Beach Park at the foot of Lake Avenue. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-322; USCG 7-2320.
[Rochester (Genesee) East Pier (3?)]
Date unknown (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 20 ft (6 m); green flash every 4 s. 17 ft (5 m) post. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Huelse has a historic postcard view of the historic lighthouse, a 25 ft (7.5 m) wood tower with lantern and gallery. This lighthouse was replaced by a skeletal tower in 1947. Located at the end of the east breakwater of the Genesee River entrance. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-1214; USCG 7-2330.

Wayne County (Sodus Bay) Lighthouses
**** Sodus Bay (Sodus Point) (2)
1871 (station established 1825). Inactive since 1901. 45 ft (14 m) square cylindrical limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 2-1/2 story limestone keeper's house, which remained in service as the keeper's house for Sodus Outer Light. A rare 3-1/2 order Fresnel lens has been mounted in the tower since 1984, and a fog bell is displayed on the grounds. Tower unpainted, lantern and gallery painted black. Corey Seeman's photo is at the top of this page, Anderson has a great page for the lighthouse, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. This lighthouse is very similar to the classic "schoolhouse" lighthouses of the upper Great Lakes. The keeper's house, expanded by a 2-story frame addition in 1900, remained in service as the keeper's house for Sodus Outer Light. Used for Coast Guard housing until 1984, the building is now a lighthouse museum operated by the Sodus Bay Historical Society. The grounds are a 4-acre (1.6 ha) public park used for concerts in the summer. Located on the lakeshore off NY 14 in Sodus Point. Site open year-round, museum and tower open daily except Mondays May through October. Owner: Village of Sodus Point. Site manager: Sodus Bay Lighthouse and Museum. ARLHS USA-766.
* Sodus Outer (Sodus Bay West Pier) (2)
1938 (station established 1901). Active; focal plane 51 ft (15.5 m); white light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 49 ft (15 m) square cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on concrete and stone pier; solar-powered lens. Tower painted white; lantern has a red roof. The old Sodus Bay Light served as the keeper's quarters. Cathy Contant's photo is at right, Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, Bash has a closeup photo, Fred Bertram has a photo of the light in a storm, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a distant street view, and Bing has an aerial view. This lighthouse replaced a square wood tower. Located at the Sodus Bay entrance in Sodus Point east of the old Sodus Point light. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard. ARLHS USA-765; USCG 7-2170.
Sodud Outer Light
USCGC Neah Bay passing Sodus Outer Light, 4 July 2011
Flickr photo copyright Cathy Contant; used by permission

Oswego County Lighthouses
Oswego Harbor West Pierhead (2)
1934 (station established 1880). Active; focal plane 57 ft (17.5 m); flash every 5 s, alternating red and white. Approx. 40 ft (12 m) square cylindrical metal tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story keeper's house, mounted on a stone caisson-like foundation at the end of the pier. The original 4th order Fresnel lens is on display at the H. Lee White Marine Museum adjacent to the pier. Buildings painted white with red roofs. Fog horn (blast every 30 s). A photo is at the top of this page, Lighthouse Digest has Tim Harrison's article on the history of the station, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Robert Yasinsak has posted photos from a visit inside the tower, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has an aerial view. In 2006, the lighthouse was offered for transfer under NHLPA, and city officials worked with the H. Lee White Marine Museum to acquire the lighthouse. The deed was transferred to the city in May 2009. Rehabilitation of the lighthouse began in late 2012, aided by a $225,000 grant from the State Canal Corporation, and was completed in early spring 2013. Located at the end of West First Street in downtown Oswego. Good view from the city's Bretbeck Park. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: City of Oswego. ARLHS USA-571; USCG 7-2080.
* [Fort Ontario]
1822. Inactive since 1841. The original Oswego lighthouse was built on the east side of the Oswego River entrance; the 1-story stone keeper's house survives and is preserved within Fort Ontario State Historic Site. There is a marker for the former location of the lighthouse in the park. Site open.
** Selkirk (Port Ontario, Salmon River)
1838 (Jabez Meacham). Reactivated (inactive 1858-1989; now privately maintained); focal plane 50 ft (15 m); white flash every 2 s. 32 ft (10 m) octagonal red-shingled tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on the roof of a 2-1/2 story fieldstone keeper's house; 190 mm lens. The tower still has its original (and very rare) birdcage lantern. Bash's photo is at right, Britten has a fine photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. An architectural treasure, this is one of the oldest "integral" lighthouses in the country, and it is the oldest one surviving without significant modification. A historic photo from the Library of Congress shows how little the building has been altered. After deactivation, the building was used as a lifesaving station for a number of years before being sold at auction in 1895; the new owners operated it as part of a hotel for many years. Privately restored beginning in 1987, the building is now a guest house (operating April through November) with accommodations available by the day or week. In 2003, the owners placed the property for sale for $1.25 million. There were no takers, so the owners hired new managers who have renovated and improved the property while preserving the lighthouse. Located on Lake Road (county route 5) adjacent to the Lighthouse Marina on the north side of the entrance to the Salmon River in Selkirk. Site open, tower open by appointment. Owner/site manager: Salmon River Lighthouse Marina. ARLHS USA-719; USCG 7-2015.

Western Jefferson County Lighthouses
* Stony Point (Henderson) (2)
1869 (station established 1830). Inactive since 1946. 73 ft (22 m) square cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 1-1/2 story keeper's house. Tower painted white, lantern black. This is one of two Stony Point Lights in New York; see under Hudson River Lighthouses on the Downstate page for the other one. Penberthy has a closeup photo, John Oliveira has a view from the lake, and Bing has a satellite view. Foundations of the original (1830) lighthouse are visible. The lighthouse was repaired after being damaged by fire in 1966. Privately owned; the lighthouse was sold in 2002 for $272,500. The new owners, Willie and Sherry Faust, have replaced the roof and made other renovations to restore a more authentic appearance to the building. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road west of Henderson. Site and tower closed, but there's an excellent view from the road. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-814.
Stony Point (3?)
1947 (?). Active; focal plane 40 ft (12 m); red light, 3 s on, 3 s off. 36 ft (11 m) square skeletal tower, painted white. The tower can be seen in a small aerial photo on Anderson's page, and Bing has a satellite view. Located in front of the historic lighthouse. Site and tower closed. USCG 7-2010.
Selkirk Light
Selkirk Light, Selkirk, April 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo copyright C.W. Bash
Galloo Island (2)
1867 (station established 1829). Inactive since 2011. 55 ft (16.5 m) round limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story limestone keeper's house. Anderson has an excellent page for the lighthouse, Lighthouse Digest has Bill Edwards's article on the history of the station, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. In 2000 the U.S. General Services Administration sold the lighthouse at auction after no public agency came forward to accept it. The owners, Anthony and Cara Divnah, put the property back on the market in 2002 with an asking price of $295,000. There were no takers, and an effort to sell the lighthouse on eBay in November 2005 did not lead to a sale. At last report the property was still on the market. The lighthouse was deactivated in the late summer of 2011. The island has now become the site of a large wind farm. Located at the southwest end of Galloo Island, about 12 mi (20 km) west of Henderson Harbor. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-314; USCG 7-2000.
Sackets Harbor (Sackett's Harbor, Horse Island) (2)
1870 (station established 1831). Inactive since 1957. 70 ft (21 m) square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story keeper's house. Formerly painted white, the tower is reverting to red brick; lantern painted red. Sibling of the Stony Point (Henderson) Light. Mark Wentling has posted historic photos, Lighthouse Digest has a May 2004 feature on life at the light station, and Bing has a satellite view. The light station was sold to Carl Martin in 1957, and the Martin family continues to maintain it as a summer residence. The active light was moved to a skeletal tower (previous entry). Located on Horse Island, a small island just west of Sackets Harbor. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse is visible from the nearby Sackets Harbor Battlefield State Historic Site. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-380.
Sackets Harbor (3?)
1957 (?). Active; focal plane 57 ft (17 m); white flash every 2.5 s. 52 ft (16 m) square skeletal tower. Anderson has a small photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located in a forest in front of the historic lighthouse. Site and tower closed. USCG 7-1850.
East Charity Shoal
1877 (relocated in 1935 from Vermillion, Ohio). Active; focal plane 52 ft (16 m); white flash every 4 s. 40 ft (12 m): 30 ft (9 m) octagonal cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, atop a 1-story octagonal concrete base, mounted on a concrete caisson. Modern solar-powered lens (1992). Penberthy has a photo by Albert Smith, and the Coast Guard has a historic photo. This light was refurbished and relocated from Vermillion, Ohio, where it had been damaged severely in a storm in 1929. In September 2009 the lighthouse was sold for $25,501 to Cyrena Nolan of Dallas, Texas. She says she hopes to refurbish it as a vacation cottage. Located in Lake Ontario about 7 mi (11 km) southwest of Tibbetts Point. Accessible only by boat; the lighthouse can be seen with binoculars from Tibbett's Point Light. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-970; USCG 7-1760.
*** Tibbett's Point (2)
1854 (station established 1827). Active; focal plane 69 ft (21 m); white light occulting every 10 s. 59 ft (18 m) round cylindrical stucco-clad brick tower with lantern and gallery; original 4th order Fresnel lens. Tower painted white, lantern black. 2-1/2 story keeper's house (1880) and 1-story brick fog signal building (1895). The steam-powered diaphone fog signal (1927) has been preserved in operational condition, although it is no longer used. Doug Kerr's photo is at right, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic aerial photo, Pat McAvoy-Costin has an article on the history of the station, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. This very well-preserved light station features one of the first masonry lighthouses built by the Lighthouse Board and the only operational Fresnel lens on Lake Ontario. The keeper's house is leased to Hostelling International as a youth hostel, but the rest of the station is leased to the Tibbetts Point Lighthouse Society. The society works for restoration of the tower and maintains a lighthouse museum (1993) on site. An exterior restoration was completed in 1999. Located southwest of Cape Vincent at the point where the St. Lawrence River flows out of Lake Ontario. Site and museum open daily late June through early September and Friday through Sunday late May through late June and early September through early October; hostel operates mid-May to mid-October; tower closed. Owner: Village of Cape Vincent. Site managers: Tibbetts Point Lighthouse Society and Tibbetts Point Lighthouse Hostel. ARLHS USA-848; Admiralty H2836; USCG 7-1735.
Tibbetts Point Light
Tibbett's Point Light, Cape Vincent, August 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Doug Kerr

St. Lawrence River Lighthouses (see also Southeastern Ontario)

Note: The St. Lawrence River flows along the border between the U.S. and Canada for the first 120 mi (190 km) of its course as it leaves Lake Ontario. The river is part of an international waterway, the St. Lawrence Seaway, connecting the Great Lakes to the Atlantic Ocean. Aids to navigation on the U.S. portion of the Seaway are maintained by the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation.
Northern Jefferson County Lighthouses
* Cape Vincent Breakwater
1900. Inactive since 1934. Short, square concrete block tower (now covered with white aluminum siding) with lantern and gallery. Lantern painted black. Formerly mounted at the end of the breakwater, the lighthouse was relocated to the grounds of the town hall in 1951. The Coast Guard has a historic photo of the light on the breakwater, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. Located beside NY 12E (Market Street) near Stone Quarry Road at the southern entrance to Cape Vincent. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Village of Cape Vincent. ARLHS USA-141.
* Clayton
1961. Active (unofficial; maintained by the town); focal plane 18 ft (5.5 m); continuous white light. 15 ft (4.5 m) round granite tower with lantern; unpainted. Robert English has a 2009 closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse was built by the local American Legion post as a memorial for local veterans of all wars. Located adjacent to the town docks on Riverside Drive at John Street in downtown Clayton, five blocks north of NY 12. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Town of Clayton.
*** Rock Island (2)
1882 (station established 1847). Inactive since 1956 (a decorative white light is displayed). 50 ft (15 m): 30 ft (9 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, a sibling of Ten Pound Island MA, raised atop a 20 ft (6 m) round brick tower in 1903. Entire tower painted white. 2-story frame keeper's quarters (1882), steel generator house (1900), and other buildings; an unusually well preserved light station. Anderson has a fine page for the lighthouse, a good photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. Local summer residents have supported the lighthouse informally over the years, and in 2000 the Rock Island Lighthouse Historical and Memorial Association was formed to publicize the history of the station, encourage preservation of the light station, and promote better public access. The Association's web site has a drawing of the original lighthouse and historic photos of the present light before and after its height was increased. In June 2010, work began on a $1.1 restoration project. The work was completed in early 2013 and the lighthouse opened for tours in June. There is a small museum and gift shop in the keeper's house, and docking for boats is provided. Located on an island in the St. Lawrence between Fisher's Landing and Thousand Island Park, southwest of Alexandria Bay. Accessible only by boat. Tour boats from Clayton often pass the island. Site and tower open in season. Owner/site manager: New York State Parks. ARLHS USA-697.
Sunken Rock (Alexandria Bay) (Seaway Light 191) (2)
1884 (station established 1847). Active (maintained by the Seaway authority); focal plane 28 ft (8.5 m); green flash every 2.5 s. 30 ft (9 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, original 6th order Fresnel lens converted to solar power. Tower painted white, lantern green. 1-story boathouse. The lighthouse is a sibling of Ten Pound Island Light, Massachusetts. A photo is at right, Jacob Shemkovitz has a photo, Britten has a fine photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on an artificial island in the St. Lawrence north of Alexandria Bay. Accessible only by boat. Good views from the waterfront in Alexandria Bay or from river cruises. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation. ARLHS USA-828; Admiralty H2786; USCG 7-1340.
Sunken Rock Light
Sunken Rock Light, Alexandria Bay, July 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by aj-clicks

St. Lawrence County Lighthouses
Sisters Island
1870. Inactive since 1959. 60 ft (18 m) square cylindrical limestone brick tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one side of a 1-1/2 story limestone keeper's house; lantern painted white with a red roof. Bing has a distant satellite view. When the St. Lawrence Seaway opened in 1959, the lighthouse was deactivated and sold to the Gavel family, which has owned and maintained it ever since. Located on Sisters Island in the St. Lawrence off Schermerhorn Landing, about 2.5 miles (4 km) southwest of Chippewa Bay. Visible from NY 12 about 6 miles (10 km) east of Alexandria Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-1053.
Crossover Island (Seaway Light 160) (2)
1882 (station established 1848). Inactive since 1941. 30 ft (9 m) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted white, lantern red. 1-1/2 story Queen Anne style frame keeper's quarters (1848). Oil house and other buildings also preserved. A modern post light (focal plane 28 ft (8.5 m); red flash every 4 s) stands in the river in front of the keeper's house. The Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse is a sibling of the Ten Pound Island lighthouse in Massachusetts. The light station has been a private summer residence since it was deactivated. The island and light station were sold in 2002 for $465,000; Lighthouse Digest carried Bill Edwards's feature story on new owner John Urtis. Urtis put the island back on sale in 2011 for $539,900, and it remains on sale as of April 2013. Located near the international boundary in the middle of the St. Lawrence north of Chippewa Bay. Visible from a NY 12 scenic overlook northeast of Chippewa Bay. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-206; CCG (Canadian) 345; USCG 7-1195.


Crossover Island Light, Hammond, October 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo copyright C.W. Bash

Ogdensburg Harbor (2)
1870 (station established 1834). Reactivated (inactive 1960s-2011, now privately maintained); focal plane 70 ft (21 m); white flash every 10 s. 65 ft (20 m) square cylindrical limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to 1-1/2 story stone and frame keeper's house. The upper part of the tower (an extension added in 1900) is painted white, while the original lower portion is unpainted gray stone; lantern painted red. A 2008 photo is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a very distant street view from the Oswegatchie River Bridge (NY 68), and Bing has a satellite view. In June 2007, there was a brief flurry of concern when the owner, Blair Roethel, applied for a permit to demolish the lighthouse. Apparently this was part of an elaborate struggle between Roethel and the city council over taxes and development rules for waterfront property. Instead of demolishing the building, Roethel has restored it. He also established a web site for the lighthouse and secured permission from the Coast Guard to relight it. The relighting ceremony was held on 8 October 2011. Located at Lighthouse Point, 1 Jackson Street, on the St. Lawrence in Ogdensburg. There's a good view from the foot of Riverside Drive on the other (east) side of the Oswegatchie River. Site and tower closed except for approved tours. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-562; USCG 7-0992.

Lake Champlain Lighthouses (see also Vermont)

Note: Located on the border between New York and Vermont, Lake Champlain is part of an international waterway connecting the St. Lawrence and Hudson Rivers. The lake drains northward to the St. Lawrence River through the Richelieu River, and it is connected to the Hudson River and Atlantic Ocean by the Champlain Canal.
Clinton County Lighthouses
Point Aux Roches
1858. Inactive since 1989. 50 ft (15 m) octagonal limestone block tower with lantern and gallery. Tower unpainted; lantern painted black. The 1-1/2 story wood keeper's quarters, formerly attached, has been relocated nearby as a private residence. A photo is at right, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Bing has an aerial view, and Google has a satellite view. This is an endangered lighthouse. The masonry in the tower deteriorated, leading the Coast Guard to abandon it in 1989. The light was moved to a buoy offshore (USCG 1-39250). The tower remains in Coast Guard ownership. The Town of Beekmantown has expressed interest in leasing it for preservation, and the Lake Champlain Basin Program granted funds for an engineering study. The town has a web page for the lighthouse. Located on Point Aux Roches Road on the New York shore south of Isle la Motte, Vermont. Owner/site manager: U.S. Coast Guard (tower) and a private landowner (keeper's house). ARLHS USA-614.
Cumberland Head (2)
1868 (station established 1838). Reactivated (inactive 1934-2003); focal plane 75 ft (23 m); red flash every 4 s. 50 ft (15 m) round limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story limestone keeper's quarters; lantern painted black. Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has an aerial view. The station was abandoned and heavily vandalized when Joseph and Rose Church bought it in 1948; they restored the buildings and lived on the site for nearly 50 years. Lighthouse Digest printed a history of the light station in 1996, when it was for sale. The light was moved back to the tower in March 2003 after being on a skeletal tower nearby for 69 years. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road on the Cumberland Head peninsula east of Plattsburgh. Visible from the Plattsburgh-Grand Isle VT ferry (NY/VT 314). Site and tower closed (private residence). Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-211; USCG 1-39380.
Point aux Roches Light
Point aux Roches Light, Beekmantown
Town of Beekmantown photo
** Bluff Point (Valcour Island) (1)
1874. Reactivated (inactive 1930-2004); focal plane 95 ft (29 m); white flash every 4 s. 35 ft (12 m) octagonal cylindrical frame tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a 2-story limestone and wood Empire-style keeper's house. The light tower and the upper story of the house are covered with red shingles; lower story is unpainted gray stone; lantern and gallery painted white. 300 mm solar-powered lens. Sibling of Barber's Point. Anderson has a fine page for the light station, a fine closeup is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, the Coast Guard has a historic photo, and Bing has an aerial view. In 1930 the active light was moved to a black square pyramidal skeletal tower. Sara Johns's 2008 photo shows this skeletal tower still standing. In 2001, a state grant supported interior repairs to the lighthouse. The light was returned to the lighthouse on 16 November 2004. In September 2014, the parks adminsitration began a long-delayed restoration of the lighthouse, including a new roof, foundation repairs, interior renovation, and asbestos abatement. Located at the tip of a peninsula on the west shore of Valcour Island, a tiny part of Adirondack State Park, south of Plattsburgh. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower open Sunday afternoons between July 1 and Labor Day. Owner: New York State Parks. Site manager: Clinton County Historical Association . ARLHS USA-065; USCG 1-39470.
* Bluff Point (Valcour Island) (2)
1930. Inactive since 2004. Approx. 80 ft (24 m) square skeletal tower, painted black, mounted on a concrete base. A photo is available. This tower carried the light until it was returned to the historic lighthouse.

Essex County Lighthouses
Split Rock Point (2)
1867 (station established 1835). Reactivated (inactive 1928-2003); focal plane 93 ft (28 m); white flash every 4 s. 39 ft (12 m) octagonal limestone tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-1/2 story wood keeper's house (1899). Tower is unpainted gray stone, lantern painted white with a gray roof. The keeper's house has been a private residence since 1931; it has been expanded and modernized. Ross Andrews's photo is at right, and Bing has an aerial view. The light was moved to a red square pyramidal skeletal tower in 1928, and the light station was sold; since 1959 it has been owned by the Heurich family. By the turn of the century the skeletal tower was in poor condition, and on 19 March 2003 the Coast Guard returned the light to the lighthouse. David Manthey has a panoramic photo of the light station showing both towers. Located on Split Rock Point south of Essex. Site and tower closed (private summer residence). Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-784; USCG 1-39810.
Split Rock Point (3)
1928. Inactive since 2003. Approx. 75 ft (23 m) steel skeletal tower, painted red. The tower is seen in David Manthey's panoramic photo, and Bing has an aerial view. In March 2014, the Coast Guard announced it would remove the skeletal tower, unless someone wants to take ownership of it. Owner: U.S. Coast Guard.
Barber's Point (1)
1873. Inactive since 1935. 36 ft (11 m) octagonal cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on a 2-story limestone and wood Empire-style keeper's house. Light tower and upper story of the house painted white with black trim; lantern roof is black. The modern light is on a skeletal tower (next entry). Sibling of Colchester Reef VT. Robert English has a photo, and Bing has an aerial view. It's not likely that this lighthouse will ever be reactivated, because it is now surrounded by tall trees. There is a campground, Barber Homestead Park, behind the lighthouse property. Located on Barber Point, at the end of Barber Road off Dudley Road (county road 22G) south of Westport. Site and tower closed (private residence). Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS USA-036.

Split Rock Light, Essex, July 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Ross Andrews
Barber's Point (3)
Date unknown (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 72 ft (22 m); white flash every 4 s. 68 ft (21 m) square cylindrical skeletal tower with gallery. Anderson's page includes a photo of the present light and Bing has an aerial view. This modern light replaced the 1935 square pyramidal skeletal tower seen in a Coast Guard photo on Anderson's page. Located at the edge of the lake near the historic lighthouse. Site and tower closed (private residence). Owner/site manager: private. USCG 1-39840.
** Champlain Memorial (Crown Point) (2)
1912 (station established 1859). Inactive since 1926. 55 ft (17 m) granite memorial with six columns surrounding a round cylindrical brick light tower. Mounted on the base of the lighthouse are bronze sculptures of Samuel de Champlain, an American Indian, and a French voyageur. This building replaced an 1858 brick tower. The original 1-1/2 story brick keeper's house, formerly attached, was demolished in 1926. The Library of Congress has a photo of the original lighthouse as it appeared about 1910, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and the Coast Guard has a photo showing the light station as it appeared with the keeper's house from 1912 to 1926. Catherine New has a 2007 photo, Wikimedia has a photo by Doug Kerr, a photo taken from the lake is available, and Bing has an aerial view. In June 2004 the state announced funding to restore the lighthouse in time for the 400th anniversary of Champlain's 1609 exploration of the Lake. The restoration began in 2008 and was completed in July 2009; the lighthouse was rededicated in a ceremony on September 18. Located on the point of land just southeast of the Champlain Bridge (NY/VT 17), adjacent to the Crown Point State Historic Site and within the campground of the Crown Point historic area. Site open (entry fee to campground), tower open daily mid May to mid October. Owner/site manager: New York State Parks. ARLHS USA-207.

Oneida Lake Lighthouses

Note: Oneida Lake is the largest lake in interior New York, 21 miles (33 km) in length and about 5 miles (8 km) in width. The original Erie Canal, opened in 1825, bypassed the lake to the south. In 1905, construction began on the New York State Barge Canal, an improved version of the Erie Canal; this expanded waterway crosses the lake lengthwise. Oneida Lake is the only significant open water crossing in the canal's 365 mile (590 km) length. These three lighthouses were built in 1918, when the Barge Canal opened, to guide vessels traversing the lake.
* Brewerton Range Rear
1918. Active; focal plane 92 ft (28 m); continuous green light visible only on the range line. 85 ft (26 m) unpainted round concrete tower with gallery; no lantern. David Cook's Lighthouse Digest article of February 2001 has a photo (it's the second of the two photos in the article), Dennie Orson has a 2007 photo and a 2010 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. In 2004 the town of Hastings began development of the area around the lighthouse as the Oneida River Park; plans include a small museum in the base of the tower. In 2009 a parking area and trails were constructed. A Google satellite view shows the improvements in the area. The range guides vessels as they exit the lake westbound; the front light is mounted on the US 11 bridge about 350 yd (320 m) to the east. Located on the north bank of the Oneida River close to county road 37 just west of US 11 in Brewerton. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: New York State Canals. Site manager: Town of Hastings. ARLHS USA-1042; NYSC-147.
Frenchman's Island
1918. Active; focal plane 123 ft (37.5 m); green flash every 4 s. 105 ft (32 m): 20 ft (6 m) steel skeletal tower mounted atop an 85 ft (26 m) unpainted round concrete tower with gallery; no lantern. Bing has an aerial view. In 2008, New York State Parks reopened the island to the public; it had been closed for years due to frequent vandalism. Located atop a knoll at the west end of the island, about 5 miles (8 km) east southeast of Brewerton. Accessible only by boat; there are distant views from Lower South Bay on Lakeshore Drive off NY 31 on the south side of the lake, but only the very top of the lighthouse can be seen. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: New York State Canals. Site manager: New York State Parks. ARLHS USA-1045; NYSC-131.
* Verona Beach (Sylvan Beach)
1918. Active; focal plane 88 ft (27 m); white flash every 4 s. 85 ft (26 m) unpainted round concrete tower with gallery, mounted on a square 1-story concrete equipment room. Tower unpainted, equipment room painted white. Doug Kerr's photo is at right, Lighthouse Digest has David Cook's February 2001 article on the Oneida Lake lighthouses, Dennie Orson has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. A support group, the Verona Beach Lighthouse Association, works for preservation of this lighthouse. The group cleared brush from the site, replaced the entry door and several windows, and installed a brighter light. The town has paved the entrance to the station and provided a small parking lot for visitors. Located off Forest Avenue between 3rd Avenue and 5th Avenue, west of NY 13, in Verona Beach. Some care is needed to find the unmarked entrance to the lighthouse. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: New York State Canals. Site maneger: Verona Beach Lighthouse Association. ARLHS USA-1052; NYSC-105.

Verona Beach Light, Verona, September 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Doug Kerr

Cayuga Lake Lighthouses

Note: Cayuga Lake is the longest of the Finger Lakes, a series of roughly parallel glacial lakes in western New York. The lake is about 40 miles (64 km) long and generally less than 2 miles (3 km) wide. At its northern end, the Cayuga-Seneca Canal connects the lake to the New York State Canal.
Cayuga Inlet West (Glenwood Point)
1927. Active; focal plane 28 ft (8.5 m); flashing red light. 25 ft (7.5 m) square pyramidal steel-clad wooden tower, painted red. Liren Chen's photo is at right, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has an aerial view. Located on a detached (and usually submerged) breakwater northwest of the creek entrance; the breakwater shelters the marina of the Allen H. Treman State Marine Park off NY 89 northwest of Ithaca. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/operator: New York State Canals. ARLHS USA-1213; NYSC-148.
* Cayuga Inlet East (Lighthouse Point)
1917 (relocated from the west bank to the east bank of the creek in 1927). Active; focal plane 28 ft (8.5 m); flashing white light. 25 ft (7.5 m) square pyramidal steel-clad wooden tower, painted white. A 2009 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has an aerial view. Mark Anbinder's 2011 photo shows the lighthouse with a troubling lean. Located at the end of the breakwater at Lighthouse Point, the east bank of the creek entrance at the southern end of the lake in Ithaca. Accessible by walking the breakwater after a hike of about 3/4 mile (1.2 km) from the western end of Pier Road. Site open, tower closed. Owner/operator: New York State Canals. ARLHS USA-1043; NYSC-147.
* Myers Point
1998. Active (privately maintained); focal plane about 40 ft (12 m); yellow flash every 6 s. Approx. 25 ft (7.5 m) round brick tower with lantern, painted white with brown bands at the top and bottom. Built by volunteers as a community project, the light marks a conspicuous point jutting into the lake. Lighthouse Digest has an April 2003 article by Bill Edwards, Mark Anbinder has a good 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has an aerial view. Located in Myers Park in Lansing, on Myers Road off NY 34B about 10 miles (16 km) north of Ithaca. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Lansing Parks and Recreation Department. ARLHS USA-1216.

Cayuga Inlet West Light
Cayuga Inlet West Light, Ithaca, July 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Liren Chen

Other Inland Lighthouses

Chautauqua Lake Lighthouse
* Mayville
1990s. Active; focal plane about 30 ft (9 m); continuous white light. 25 ft (7.5 m) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery. A 2012 photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has an aerial view. According to Lighthouse Digest. The lighthouse was built as a war memorial; more information is needed. Chautauqua Lake is a glacial lake, 17 mi (27 km) long and up to 2 mi (3 km) wide, located in far western New York. Located in Lakeside Park in Mayville, at the northern end of the lake.Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Village of Mayville.

Otsego Lake Lighthouse
* Cooperstown Marina
ca. 1955. Active; focal plane about 45 ft (13.5 m); quick-flashing white light. Approx. 40 ft (12 m) round cylindrical tower with a small lantern and gallery, painted white with a narrow horizontal red band; lantern painted black. The light is actually on a short mast atop the lantern, not in the lantern. Corey Seeman has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. The source of the Susquehanna River, Otsego Lake is a glacial lake 9 m (15 km) long, located in the central part of New York. Located at the end of Fair Street in Cooperstown, at the south end of the lake. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Lakefront Motel, Restaurant, and Marina.

Fourth Lake Lighthouse
Shoal Point
1890s. Active; focal plane about 30 ft (9 m); flashing white light. 30 ft (9 m) octagonal wooden (?) tower with wooden lantern. Bing has an indistinct satellite view. Built to mark a hazard in Fourth Lake, in the Adirondack Mountains west of Inlet in northern New York. Long neglected, this tower was fully restored in 2000-01 with private donations and a state historical preservation grant of $19,210. Located at the end of Cold Spring Camp Road, off NY 28 about 4 miles (6.5 km) west of Eagle Bay near the western end of the lake. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Fourth Lake Property Owners Association. ARLHS USA-1220.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Carleton Island (1899-1958?), St. Lawrence River, Jefferson County. The lighthouse has been replaced by a leading light. ARLHS USA-1246; USCG 7-1670.
  • Fair Haven Pier (1872-1943), Lake Ontario, Cayuga County. The lighthouse has been replaced by a pair of breakwater post lights. ARLHS USA-278; USCG 7-2135 and 2140.
  • Fair Haven Range (?-1945?), Lake Ontario, Cayuga County. ARLHS USA-1304.
  • Niagara River Range Front (1885-1929?), Niagara River, Niagara County. The rear lighthouse was relocated to Grand Island (see above). ARLHS USA-1120.
  • Oswego Inner (1836-1929), Lake Ontario, Oswego County. Huelse has a historic postcard view. ARLHS USA-1203.
  • Plattsburgh Breakwater Northeast and Southwest (1867-?), Lake Champlain, Clinton County. The northeast lighthouse has been replaced by a small skeletal tower (ARLHS USA-1121; USCG 1-39420) and the southwest light by a post (ARLHS USA-1123; USCG 1-39415).
  • Seneca Lake (1870-1940s), Geneva, Ontario County. ARLHS USA-1219.
  • Strawberry Island Upper Cut Range Front and Rear (?-?), Niagara River, Erie County. ARLHS USA-819 and 820.

Notable faux lighthouses:

  • Island Street Boatyard (2000), an ornate 70 ft (21 m) light tower attached to a 2-story brick building, has not been recognized as an official aid to navigation. It is located on the Tonawanda Channel of the Niagara River in downtown North Tonawanda; Google has a satellite view.
  • Riverside Park, Crowley Avenue and Tonawanda Street, Buffalo, has a well known decorative lighthouse; in 2010 there was an effort underway to restore and light this tower. However, a light would not be useful for navigation. Google has a street view and an aerial view.
  • Round Island, in the St. Lawrence off Clayton, is a conspicuous tower but it has never carried a light.
  • St. Johnsville Marina, on the Mohawk River between Schenectady and Sylvan Beach, has a small faux lighthouse. It is not an aid to navigation.

Adjoining pages: North: Southeastern Ontario | East: Vermont | South: Downstate New York
Adjoining pages: West: Northwestern Pennsylvania, Southwestern Ontario

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index

Checked and revised April 9, 2014. Lighthouses: 56. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.