Lighthouses of Canada: Western Ontario

The Canadian province of Ontario has a tremendous width east to west, including the entire Canadian side of the Great Lakes. Across this vast area there were once about 250 lighthouses. More than 130 remain, a large percentage of them active. This page includes lighthouses in the western part of the province, guiding vessels on the St. Mary's River, Lake Superior, the Rainy River, and the Lake of the Woods.

Aids to navigation in Canada are maintained by the Canadian Coast Guard. In 2008, Parliament passed the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to designate and protect historic lighthouses. In 2010, the Coast Guard declared the great majority of lighthouses to be surplus, and there is fear that this may lead to the disposal and possible destruction of many lighthouses. This fear is particularly acute in more remote areas, where the lighthouses do not enjoy the support of local preservation groups. In fact, dozens of lighthouses have already been lost in this region.

A note: this page has been greatly improved by the comments and corrections of Michel Forand. I'd also like to thank Ron Walker of the Canadian Coast Guard for answering a number of questions. (If errors remain, they are mine.)

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. CCG numbers are from the Inland Waters volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. For lights near the international border, USCG numbers are from volume 7 of the U.S. Coast Guard Light List.

General Sources
Lighthouses of Lake Superior
Photos posted by C.W. Bash.
Ontario Canada Lighthouses
Excellent photos plus historical and visitor information from Kraig Anderson's LighthouseFriends.com web site.
Lighthouses in Ontario
Photos by various photographers available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Canadian part of Great Lakes
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Lighthouses in Ontario, Canada
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lighthouses of the Great Lakes
This site, maintained by Neil Schultheiss, has excellent photos and brief but informative accounts for many of the lighthouses on both the Canadian and U.S. sides of the Lakes.
 


Trowbridge Island Light, Lake Superior, October 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash

Algoma District Lighthouses

St. Joseph Channel and St. Joseph Island Lighthouses
Note: The St. Joseph Channel separates St. Joseph Island from the mainland and carries part of the outflow of the St. Mary's River, which drains Lake Superior into Lake Huron. The channel is wide on the east, where it connects to the North Channel, but it narrows to the west, where it is crossed by the ON 548 bridge near Port Findlay.
* McKay Island
1907. Inactive since 1975. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery mounted on the roof of 2-story square wood keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern roof is red. The active light (focal plane 14 m (45 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off) is on a 10 m (32 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower carrying a red and white rectangular slatwork daymark. Bash's photo is at right, Bruce Bay Cottages has a photo, a 2011 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. By the time it was deactivated, the lighthouse was severely deteriorated. Harold Peterson, who owned the rest of the island, purchased the building and restored it. Still owned by the Peterson family, the lighthouse is now available year-round for vacation rental. Located on an island off Bruce Mines on the north side of the channel. The island is accessible by bridges from the mainland via French Island. Site open, lighthouse open only to paying guests. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Bruce Bay Cottages and Lighthouse Resort. ARLHS CAN-311; CCG 1050.
West Sister Rock
1885 (relocated here in 1905). Active; focal plane 11.5 m (38 ft); white flash every 4 s. 9 m (29 ft) hexagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. A 2009 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This lighthouse was originally built on North Sister Rock and was relocated in 1905. Located on a tiny island off the northeast coast of St. Joseph Island. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-528; CCG 1054.

McKay Island Light, Bruce Mines, October 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Wilson Channel Range Front
1905. Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); continuous red light visible only on the range line. 8 m (27 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line. This is a "downbound" (eastbound or southbound) range. Bash has a good photo, Schultheiss has a photo showing both towers, and Google has a satellite view. Located beyond the end of Range Lights Road on the north side of the channel east of the ON 548 bridge to St. Joseph Island. Land access blocked by private property. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-599; CCG 1055.
Wilson Channel Range Rear
1905. Active; focal plane 35.5 m (117 ft); continuous red light. 9 m (29 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line. Bash has a photo, Schultheiss has a photo by Dave Wobser showing both towers, and Google has a satellite view. Located 220 m (240 yd) northeast of the front light, beyond the end of Range Lights Road on the north side of the channel east of the ON 548 bridge to St. Joseph Island. Land access blocked by private property. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-600; CCG 1056.
* Richards Landing (3)
2009 (station establishment date unknown). Active; focal plane 8.5 m (28 ft); green flash every 5 s. Approx. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern and gallery rail red. A photo is at right, an August 2009 photo and a 2011 closeup are available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The original light was mounted on the roof of a warehouse on the town wharf; this was replaced in 1940 by a 7 m (23 ft) post light. In 2004, retired judge Ray Stortini started a campaign to replace the beacon with a lighthouse; Judge Stortini also contibuted the funds to construct the building. The lighthouse was activated in a ceremony on 30 May 2009. Located on the wharf at Richards Landing. Site open, tower closed. CCG 1057.
Shoal Island (2)
1909 (station established 1881). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white flash every 4 s. 10.5 m (34 ft) square cylindrical wood tower with lantern and gallery centered on the roof of 2-story wood keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. Lighthouse Explorer has Michel Forand's photo, Schultheiss has a page by Dave Wobser, Bryan O'Toole has a nice photo, and Google has a satellite view. Presently endangered. The Coast Guard declared the building surplus in 2008, with the intention of replacing it with a skeletal tower. The St. Joseph Township Council has expressed its willingness to take ownership of the lighthouse if the Coast Guard will make some needed repairs. Negotiations are continuing. The lighthouse was still active in the summer of 2011, although Schultheiss has described it as inactive. Located on a small island just off the northwest coast of St. Joseph Island; visible from the end of B Line Road near Richards Landing. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-588; CCG 1058.
Richards Landing Light
Richards Landing Light, St. Joseph, May 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Beautifulbert
Stribling Point Range Front (2?)
Date unknown (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); continuous white light. 16 m (52 ft) round cylindrical tower, painted white. The tower is listed with an orange vertical stripe, but no stripe is seen in the available photo. Google has a satellite view. This range is called an upbound range in both the Canadian and U.S. light lists, but actually it guides downbound vessels in the St. Marys River around the northern end of Neebish Island. The rear light is on a similar but shorter tower. Located at the northwestern point of St. Joseph Island. Probably accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-825; USCG 7-13260; CCG 1064.
* Sailor's Encampment Range Front (3?)
Date unknown (station established 1892). Active; focal plane 19.5 m (64 ft); continuous white light. 12.5 m (41 ft) round cylindrical tower, painted white and carrying a trapezoidal daymark painted white with a red vertical stripe. Tess Parker has a photo, a second photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. This range guides northbound (upbound) vessels in the narrow passage between St. Joseph Island and Neebish Island. The rear light is on a skeletal mast. Located in front of the historic Sailor's Encampment Church on the northwest side of St. Joseph Island. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-820; USCG 7-13100; CCG 1060.

Upper St. Mary's River (Sault Sainte Marie Area) Lighthouses
Pointe aux Pins Range Front
1903. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); continuous green light. 8.5 m (28 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white with red trim and a red vertical stripe on the range line. Schultheiss has a page for the range lights, Bash has a 2011 photo, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This is an "upbound" (westbound) range guiding ships around a sharp bend in the river above the Soo Locks. Despite its name, the lighthouse is on Pointe Louise, not Pointe aux Pins. Located on the point, at the end of Pointe Louise Road on the west side of Sault Sainte Marie. Site closed (surrounded by private property), tower closed. Soo Locks Boat Tours has a lighthouse cruise that provides a view of this lighthouse. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-889; USCG 7-14325; CCG 1077.
Pointe aux Pins Range Rear (1)
1903. Inactive since about 1975. 17 m (56 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim, attached to a 1-story wood residence. Schultheiss has a page for the range lights, Dave Wobser has a great photo, and Google has a satellite view. After deactivation, the lighthouse was sold, relocated to private property near its original location, and attached to a residence. The original keeper's house was destroyed. Located near the end of Point Louise Road on the west side of Sault Sainte Marie. Site closed (surrounded by private property), tower closed. Soo Locks Boat Tours has a lighthouse cruise that provides a view of this lighthouse. Owner/site manager: uncertain. ARLHS CAN-890.
Pointe aux Pins Range Rear (3)
2010. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); continuous green light. 17 m (55 ft) slender square steel skeletal tower. The tower carries a trapezoidal slatted daymark painted white with a red vertical stripe. Bash has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Dave Wobser has a photo showing the front light and the second rear light, a tripod tower. Located 280 m (980 ft) southwest of the front light, on the tip of a small peninsula at the end of Harriet Street. Site status unknown. USCG 7-14330; CCG 1078.
Gros Cap Reef
1953 (lightship station established 1923). Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); red flash every 5 s. 18 m (60 ft) structure: the light is displayed from a skeletal mast mounted on the roof of a 3-story keeper's quarters. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. The lighthouse also carries a helipad and a tall triangular radio mast. Bash's photo is at right, Dan Cravotta has a closeup photo, Rob Fekete has a distant view, and Marinas.com has aerial photos, but the light is only a blur in Google's satellite view. The lighthouse is mounted on a concrete crib that has a knife-edge similar to a ship's prow pointed northwest; this design splits ice floes in the winter. Located on the southwest edge of the reef guarding the entrance to the river from Lake Superior. Accessible only by boat; Soo Locks Boat Tours has a lighthouse cruise that provides a view of this lighthouse, and there is a distant view from the Point Iroquois lighthouse in the U.S., 4 km (2.5 mi) m. There is also a distant view from the U.S. lighthouse at Point Iroquois, Michigan, about 4 km (2.5 mi) to the southwest. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-565; USCG 7-14495; CCG 1081.
Gros Cap Light
Gros Cap Reef Light, Sault Sainte Marie, September 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash

Eastern Lake Superior Lighthouses
Île Parisienne
1912. Active; focal plane 16 m (53 ft); white flash every 10 s. 9 m (30 ft) hexagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. The two keeper's houses are staffed in season as the initial contact for eastbound vessels entering the Soo Traffic Control Area. Bash's photo is at right, Schultheiss has a page with several photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Île Parisienne is an uninhabited 900 ha (2200 acre) island in Whitefish Bay southeast of Whitefish Point, Michigan, and northwest of the entrance to the St. Mary's River. Most of the island is wilderness included in the Île Parisienne Conservation Reserve; a 46 ha (114 acre) tract at the southeast corner is privately owned. Lighthouse located at the southwest corner of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-567; USCG 7-14510; CCG 1082.
Corbeil Point (2)
1931 (station established 1873). Inactive since 1961. Square cylindrical wood tower mounted on the roof of 2-story wood keeper's quarters. Anderson has a current photo, and Bing has an indistinct satellite view. The original lighthouse was replaced after being struck by lightning in the fall of 1930. In 1967, the light station property was ceded to its original owners, the Batchewana First Nation of Ojibways. The lighthouse was then designated as the residence of the hereditary chief, currently Joe Tom Sayers. Located on a prominent cape at the west side of the entrance to Batchawana Bay, about 3 km (2 mi) southwest of the town of Batchawana Bay. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Batchewana First Nation of Ojibways. ARLHS CAN-1028.
* Coppermine Point
1910. Inactive since the 1960s. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal frame tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern and gallery are red. Bash has a photo, Anderson has a photo, Earl Minnis has a winter photo, Michele Maki also has a photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. Endangered. Originally located on the cape, about 20 km (13 mi) northwest of Batchawana Bay; it was replaced there by a small post light. After deactivation, the lighthouse was sold and relocated to a restaurant and campground at Hibbard Bay, about 3 km (2 mi) to the north. These businesses are now closed but the lighthouse still stands beside the Trans-Canada Highway (ON 17) about 85 km (53 mi) north of Sault Sainte Marie. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: unknown. ARLHS CAN-147.
Île Parisienne Light
Île Parisienne Light, Lake Superior, September 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Michipicoten Harbour (2)
1980 (station established 1902). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 10 s. 12.5 m (41 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower. Several Coast Guard station buildings. Johanna Wandel has a photo, a closeup snapshot is available, and Google has an indistinct satellite view. The original lighthouse, a square wood tower, was demolished after being deactivated. Located on Perkwakwia Point about 10 km (6 mi) west of Michipicoten and 25 km (15 mi) west of Wawa, at the extreme northeastern corner of Lake Superior. Site status unknown. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1318; USCG 7-16855; CCG 1093.

Thunder Bay District Lighthouses

Northeastern Lake Superior Lighthouses
Caribou Island (2)
1912 (station established 1886). Active; focal plane 30 m (99 ft); white flash every 15 s. 31.5 m (104 ft) hexagonal concrete tower with six flying buttresses, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern, gallery, and watch room are red. All other structures demolished. The original 2nd order Fresnel lens is displayed at the Coast Guard Base in Parry Sound. Bob Mackie's photo is at right, Laurie Mackie has a 2011 closeup, and Google has a distant satellite view. Marinas.com has aerial photos, but they show the station before the houses and other buildings were removed. Lighthouse Explorer has a historic view of the station from the lake. Caribou Island is about 55 km (35 mi) off Agawa Bay on the east shore of the lake. The lighthouse is located on a small island southwest of Caribou Island itself and about 5 km (3 mi) north of the international border. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-631; USCG 7-16845; CCG 1096.
Michipicoten Island East End
1912. Active; focal plane 25.5 m (84 ft); white flash every 10 s. 21.5 m (71 ft) hexagonal concrete tower with six flying buttresses, lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern, gallery, and watch room are red. J. Rowe Heritage Consulting has a page with a photo and the history of the station, Naturally Superior Adventures has posted a photo of unknown date, Lighthouse Explorer has a photo by Ken Szijarto, Johanna Wandel has a closeup of the keeper's house and the base of the tower, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Michipicoten Island is a large (500 km2 or 200 sq. mi.) wilderness island 15 km (10 mi) south of the north shore of the lake and 65 km (40 mi) southwest of Wawa. The entire island is a provincial park. Tours by sea kayak are available. Lighthouse located at the eastern end of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Michipicoten Island Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-1319; CCG 1097.
Davieaux Island (2)
1911 (station established 1872). Active; focal plane 39 m (129 ft); white flash every 20 s. 13 m (44 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern is red. User-activated fog horn (two 3 s blasts every 60 s). Anderson has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a very distant satellite view. Located on the summit of a small island, part of a reef sheltering Québec Harbour on the south side of Michipicoten Island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Michipicoten Island Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-559; CCG 1098.
Otter Island
1903. Active; focal plane 29.5 m (97 ft); white flash every 8 s. 6.5 m (21 ft) octagonal pyramidal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern is red. Anderson has good photos, Naturally Superior Adventures has a sunset photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a small island off the most remote section of the lakeshore. Accessible only by boat; tours by sea kayak available. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Pukaskwa National Park. ARLHS CAN-582; CCG 1102.
Caribou Island Light
Caribou Island Light, Lake Superior, August 2011
Panoramio Creative Commons photo by Bob Mackie

Northern Lake Superior Lighthouses
Hawkins Island (Peninsula Harbour) (3)
1975 (station established 1891). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); white flash every 4 s. 13 m (43 ft) square steel skeletal tower. No photo available; Google has a satellite view of the station. The original lighthouse was replaced in 1929 by the lighthouse shown in the photo contributed to Lighthouse Explorer by Michel Forand. The 1929 lighthouse was destroyed after being deactivated in 1975. The island is named for an early keeper, David Hawkins. Located at the southwestern tip of the island, at the entrance to Peninsula Harbour at Marathon. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1081; CCG 1106.
Slate Islands
1902. Active; focal plane 68 m (224 ft); white light, 10 s on, 5 s off. 7 m (22 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Two 2-story keeper's houses and other light station buildings located on the shore below the lighthouse. Anderson has photos, a view from the lake is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The Slate Islands, located about 11 km (7 mi) southeast of Terrace Bay, are included in a provincial park. Lighthouse located on a high ridge on the south side of Patterson Island. Accessible only by boat; transportation from Terrace Bay or Rossport can be arranged and tours by sea kayak are available. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Slate Islands Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-589; USCG 7-16865; CCG 1111.
Battle Island (2)
1911 (station established 1877). Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); three white flashes, separated by 4 s, every 24 s. 13 m (43 ft) round concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery painted red. Keeper's house occupied by a resident caretaker, who is the former keeper. Anderson has photos, Schultheiss has a closeup photo by Lisa Bryson, R.L. Cook has a good photo (last photo on the page), a view from the lake is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. Located at the western end of the island, south of Rossport. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-547; USCG 7-16870; CCG 1117.
Lamb Island (2)
1961 (station established 1877). Active; focal plane 30 m (99 ft); white flash every 5 s. 12 m (40 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower. The 2-story wood keeper's house and several other buildings remain of the original light station. Anderson has photos, Bill Zeleny has a 2008 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a small island off the western entrance to Nipigon Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-757; CCG 1126.

Thunder Bay Area Lighthouses
Shaganash Island ("Island Number 10")
1910. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); white flash every 4 s. 7.5 m (24 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern and gallery are red. Anderson has photos, R.L. Cook has several excellent photos (1/3 to 1/2 the way down the page), and Bing has a satellite view. In 2014 a new group, Canadian Lighthouses of Lake Superior, assumed management and restored the lighthouse; they repainted the lighthouse in 2014 and there are plans to make it available for overnight accommodations for boaters and kayakers. Located on a small island east of Edward Island and about 25 km (15 mi) northeast of the village of Silver Islet. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Lighthouses of Lake Superior. ARLHS CAN-587; CCG 1127.
Porphyry Point (2)
1960 (station established 1873). Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white flash every 10 s. 14.5 m (48 ft) square pyramidal skeletal tower with square central cylinder, lantern and gallery, painted white. 2-story keeper's quarters and other light station buildings. Bash's photo is at right, R. L. Cook has posted several good closeup photos (top of the page), Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view of the station. In 2014 a new group, Canadian Lighthouses of Lake Superior, assumed management and restored the lighthouse; they repainted the lighthouse in 2014 and there are plans to make it available for overnight accommodations for boaters and kayakers. Porphyry Island is a provincial nature reserve and a popular destination for sea kayakers. Located at the southwestern tip of the island guarding the entrance into Black Bay, about 8 km (5 mi) east of Silver Islet. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Canadian Lighthouses of Lake Superior. Site manager: Porphyry Island Provincial Park. ARLHS CAN-584; USCG 7-16885; CCG 1128.
Trowbridge Island
1910. Active; focal plane 35 m (114 ft); white flash every 5 s. 7 m (23 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern and gallery painted red. 3rd order Fresnel lens. 2-story keeper's quarters and other light station buildings. Bash's photo appears at the top of this page, Anderson has excellent photos, SailSuperior.com has a view from the lake, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. The Friends of Trowbridge Island Lighthouse works for the preservation of the light station. Located atop a small island east of Thunder Cape on the approach to Thunder Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-596; USCG 7-16890; CCG 1129.
Porphyry Point Light
Porphyry Point Light, Black Bay, July 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C.W. Bash
Angus Island (2)
Date unknown (station established 1927). Active; focal plane 24.5 m (81 ft); white flash every 20 s. Approx. 21 m (70 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower. The 1-1/2 story keeper's house and several other buildings remain of the original light station. Anderson has photos, and Google has a satellite view of the station. Located on a small island off Thunder Cape on the approach to Thunder Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1026; USCG 7-16895; CCG 1130.
Thunder Bay North Entrance
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9.5 m (31 ft); green flash every 4 s. 6 m (20 ft) post mounted on a 1-story equipment building, painted white. No photo available, but the light is barely visible in R.G. Bacon's aerial view and Bing has a distant satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater on the south side of the north entrance to Thunder Bay Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 1156.
Thunder Bay Main
1937. Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); red flash every 5 s. 9.5 m (31 ft) square cylindrical wood light tower with lantern and gallery, centered on the roof of a 2-story wood keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white with red trim, lantern red. User-activated fog horn (three 2 s blasts every 60 s). Bob Kissel's photo is at right, Anderson has photos, SailSuperior.com has a closeup photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. In 2013 the Friends of Trowbridge Island Lighthouse expanded its efforst to work for preservation of this lighthouse as well. Located at the end of the north breakwater sheltering the city's main harbor. Accessibility and site status unknown, but the lighthouse can be seen easily from the downtown waterfront. Tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-595; USCG 7-16915; CCG 1152.
Thunder Bay South Entrance
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); green flash every 5 s. 6 m (20 ft) post mounted on a 1-story equipment building, painted white. No photo available, but Bing has a satellite view. Located at the end of the breakwater on the south side of the south entrance to Thunder Bay Harbour. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 1150.3.
Kaministiquia (Kamistikia) River Entrance
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 6.5 m (22 ft); red flash every 10 s. 5 m (17 ft) post mounted on a 1-story equipment building, painted white. No photo available, but Bing has a satellite view. This light is probably similar to the Mission Channel Entrance Light (next entry). Located at the south end of the Thundar Bay breakwaters, marking the entrance to the river. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. CCG 1144.
Welcome Island (2)
1959 (station established 1906). Active; focal plane unknown; white flash every 10 s. Approx. 20 m (66 ft) square skeletal tower, painted red. 1-story modern keeper's house (1959) and other station buildings. A 2000 photo is available, Anderson has a distant view, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the northeastern point of the island, about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of the Thunder Bay waterfront. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. ARLHS CAN-521; CCG 1133.
Thunder Bay Main Light
Thunder Bay Main Light, Thunder Bay, June 2007
Flickr photo copyright Bob Kissel; used by permission
Mission Channel Entrance
1917. Active; focal plane 13.5 m (44 ft); green flash every 2 s. 7.5 m (25 ft) square 1-story workroom topped by a square skeletal tower. Skeletal tower is green; workroom painted white with red trim and red gallery on the roof. Google has a satellite view. Located at an elbow of the breakwater at the entrance to Mission River, on the south side of Thunder Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1016; CCG 1136.
Pie Island (2)
1904 (station established 1895). Inactive since 1953. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern, painted white with red trim. Anderson has a photo, but trees conceal the lighthouse in Google's satellite view. The original (1895) lighthouse was sold and dismantled for its lumber. The current light (focal plane 10 m (33 ft); white flash every 4 s) is on a 5 m (17 ft) skeletal tower. Pie Island is an island about 12 km (7.5 mi) long, located about 10 km (6 mi) south of Thunder Bay and 25 km (15 mi) north of Isle Royale, Michigan. Located at the west end of the island. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-792; CCG 1158.

Rainy River District Lighthouses

* Barwick
2003. Active (privately maintained and unofficial). Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse covered with unpainted wood shingles. Wikimedia has a 2012 photo, a 2004 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. Built as a civic project by volunteers, guided by plans supplied by the Coast Guard. The Rainy River drains westward into the Lake of the Woods, forming part of the boundary between Canada and the U.S. Located on the bank of the Rainy River off ON 11 in Barwick, about 80 km (50 mi) west of Fort Frances. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Chapple Township.
** Tomahawk Island
1901. Inactive since 1963. 10 m (33 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern roof is red. The Harris Hill Resort has two photos, and Bing has a distant satellite view. Originally located on an island in the Lake of the Woods, this lighthouse was sold to private owners in 1963. The lighthouse was relocated to Morson, on the northeastern extension of the lake off ON 11, where it houses a collection of artifacts of early travel on the lake. Located at the end of Lighthouse Road just south of Morson. Site open; owners will open the lighthouse on request if they are present. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-1087.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: Southeast: West Central Ontario | South: Eastern Upper Michigan | Southwest: Minnesota | West: Manitoba

Return to the Lighthouse Directory index | Ratings key

Posted December 16, 2003. Checked and revised September 30, 2014. Lighthouses: 37. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.