Lighthouses of Canada: Southwestern Ontario

The Canadian province of Ontario has a tremendous width east to west, including the entire Canadian side of the Great Lakes. Across this vast area there were once about 250 lighthouses. More than 130 remain, a large percentage of them active. This page lists the lighthouses in the southern part of the province including Lake Erie, the Detroit River, Lake St. Clair, and the St. Clair River.

Aids to navigation in Canada are maintained by the Canadian Coast Guard. In 2008, Parliament passed the Heritage Lighthouse Protection Act to designate and protect historic lighthouses. In 2010, the Coast Guard declared the great majority of lighthouses to be surplus, and there is fear that this may lead to the disposal and possible destruction of many lighthouses. This fear is particularly acute in more remote areas, where the lighthouses do not enjoy the support of local preservation groups. In fact, dozens of lighthouses have already been lost in this region.

A note: this page has been greatly improved by the comments and corrections of Michel Forand.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. CCG numbers are from the Inland Waters volume of the List of Lights, Buoys, and Fog Signals of Fisheries and Oceans Canada. For lights near the international border, USCG numbers are from volume 7 of the U.S. Coast Guard Light List.

General Sources
Ontario Canada Lighthouses
Excellent photos plus historical and visitor information from Kraig Anderson's LighthouseFriends.com web site.
Lighthouses of Lake Erie
Excellent photos posted by C.W. Bash; several of these photos appear on this page.
Lighthouses in Ontario, Canada
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Lighthouses of Ontario
An extension of Bryan Penberthy's US-lighthouses.com site.
Lighthouses of Lake Erie
Photos and brief notes posted by the tourist site LakeErieCrossroads.com; includes both Canadian and U.S. lighthouses.
Lighthouses in Ontario
Photos available from Wikimedia.
World of Lighthouses - Canadian part of Great Lakes
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Lighthouses of the Great Lakes
This site, maintained by Neil Shultheiss, has excellent photos and brief but informative accounts for many of the lighthouses on both the Canadian and U.S. sides of the Lakes.
Detroit River Lights
Photos taken in August 2007 and posted by Noah Greenia.
Leuchttürme Kanadas auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard views posted by Klaus Huelse.


Pelée Island Light, Pelée Island, July 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Library Playground

Lake Erie Lighthouses

Note: Southernmost of the Great Lakes, Lake Erie is 388 km (241 mi) long and 92 km (57 mi) wide at its greatest width. The surface of the lake is about 174 m (571 ft) above sea level. Ships sailing upstream on the St. Lawrence Seaway enter the east end of the lake from Lake Ontario via the Welland Canal, and depart the west end via the Detroit River. The lake drains to Lake Ontario via the Niagara River, flowing over Niagara Falls.
Niagara Region Lighthouses (see also Southeastern Ontario)
Point Abino
1917. Inactive since 1996. 30 m (98 ft) square concrete Greek Revival tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern is red. Ray Ordinario's photo is at right, Lighthouse Digest has an April 2006 feature article on the lighthouse, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Endangered. This remarkable lighthouse has been the object of an extended controversy. The land behind the lighthouse is occupied by upscale vacation homes whose owners were determined to prevent any public access to the lighthouse through their neighborhood. Lighthouse Digest had a story on the problem in 1999. In May 2001 the town of Fort Erie agreed to accept ownership of the lighthouse, and the Point Abino Lighthouse Preservation Society was formed to work for its restoration. In 2003 a deal was reached allowing tightly restricted public tours of the lighthouse. In 2007, there was considerable concern about the continuing deterioration of the building. The Point Abino Lighthouse Preservation Society (PALPS) was reorganized. In April 2009, the Town of Fort Erie applied to the National Historic Sites of Canada Cost Sharing Program for funding to support restoration. The program offered $425,000, and in July the town council decided (to the dismay of PALPS) to sell the keeper's house to raise matching funds. The house went on the market for $899,000 in August 2010. The $1.4 million restoration project was approved by the council in March 2011, began in May, and was completed in October. Located on the point, roughly halfway between Fort Erie and Port Colborne. Normally accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed except for guided tours offered on alternate Saturdays, June through September. Owner/site manager: Town of Fort Erie. ARLHS CAN-385.
Port Colborne Outer
1928. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); continuous red light, more intense to the south southwest. 7.5 m (25 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery, rising from the center of a 1-story concrete fog signal building. The lighthouse, floodlit at night, is painted white, lantern red. Anderson has a distant photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. This little lighthouse marks the southern entrance to the Welland Canal. A support group, Friends of Port Colborne Lighthouses, has been organized to raise funds to preserve the town's two lighthouses. Located at the south end of the T-shaped west breakwater at the canal entrance in Port Colborne. Visible distantly from Lakeview Park at the end of Elm Street. Accessible only by boat (breakwater does not connect to shore). Site and tower generally closed, but tours are avalable by appointment May through November. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-765; USCG 7-6755; CCG 556.
Point Abino Light
Point Abino Light, Fort Erie, June 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Ray Ordinario
Port Colborne Inner
1903. Active; focal plane 15 m (50 ft); white flash every 10 s. 13 m (43 ft) square pyramidal tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. The lighthouse is painted white, lantern and gallery red. Anderson has distant photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. A support group, Friends of Port Colborne Lighthouses, has been organized to raise funds to preserve the town's two lighthouses. Located at the northeast end of the T-shaped west breakwater at the canal entrance in Port Colborne. Visible distantly from Lakeview Park at the end of Elm Street. Accessible only by boat (the breakwater does not connect to shore). Site and tower generally closed, but tours are avalable by appointment May through November. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-764; USCG

Haldimand County Lighthouses
Mohawk Island (Gull Island)
1848 (John Brown). Inactive since 1969. Approx. 24 m (80 ft) stone tower attached to a stone keeper's house; both buildings are in ruins. The lighthouse was gutted by fire, and only the shells of the buildings remain. A 2011 photo is available, Wikipedia has a good 2007 closeup, Anderson has a distant photo, and a wintertime aerial photo is available, but Google has only a very distant satellite view of the island. This lighthouse is the first to be built by John Brown, who went on the build the six Imperial Towers of Lake Huron. The Mohawk Lighthouse Preservation Society was formed to work for restoration of the lighthouse. Fundraising is in progress, and some emergency repairs have been made to stabilize the keeper's house. Located on a small island about 1.5 km (1 mi) offshore between Mohawk Point and Rock Point. Visible from the end of Pyle Road off Lakeshore Road (regional route 3) about 20 km (13 mi) southeast of Dunnville; probably visible also from Rock Point Provincial Park. Accessible only by boat. Site closed April through July (bird sanctuary), tower closed. Owner: unknown. Site manager: Mohawk Island National Wildlife Area. ARLHS CAN-324.
* Port Maitland (Range Front) (2)
1898 (station established 1846). Active; focal plane 15.5 m (51 ft); green light (2 s on, 2 s off). 12.5 m (41 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery are green. Bill Strong's photo is at right, Anderson has photos, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was formerly the front light of a range, but the rear light has been demolished. Located on the end of the west pier at the mouth of the Grand River, off regional route 11 in Port Maitland, south of Dunnville. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-617; CCG 563.

Norfolk County Lighthouses
* Port Dover West Pier
1846. Active; focal plane 11 m (37 ft); green light (2 s on, 2 s off). 8.5 m (28 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern and gallery are green. User-activated fog horn (3 s blast every 30 s). Mark Lewis has a good photo, Anderson has closeup photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, another postcard view from about 1900 is available, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was repaired after being damaged by lightning in 1981. In 2014, Norfolk County agreed to take ownership of the lighthouse. Located on the end of the west pier at the foot of Harbour Street, two blocks off ON 6 in downtown Port Dover. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-616; CCG 571.
* Long Point Cut (Old Cut, Long Point West End, Port Rowan)
1879. Inactive since 1916. 15 m (50 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story wood keeper's quarters. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; the lantern (a replica) is painted red. Bash has a good photo, Anderson has several photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has street view and a satellite view. Shultheiss has a history of the lighthouse by Dave Wobser. This lighthouse marked a former channel through the base of the Long Point Peninsula; it was deactivated after the channel silted shut. There's only dry land in the area today. The building is a private summer residence. The lighthouse, which had been considerably modified, was restored by new owners in 1999-2000 and is now close to its original appearance. The original lantern was removed long ago; the gallery is an observation deck with an open replica lantern. Located just off county route 59 near the entrance to Long Point Provincial Park. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse can be seen easily from the street. Owner/site manager: private. ARLHS CAN-580.

Port Maitland Range Front Light, Dunnville, June 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Bill Strong
Long Point (2)
1916. Active; focal plane 29.5 m (97 ft); white flash every 8 s (it is reported that every fourth flash is omitted, due to a broken prism in the lens). 26 m (86 ft) octagonal concrete tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story fog signal building. Lighthouse painted white, lantern red. The original 3rd order Fresnel lens is on display at Port Burwell Light. Anderson has excellent photos, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse was originally 32 m (102 ft) tall, but its base has become buried in the sand. During a renovation in the late 1980s the buried base was filled with concrete and a new entrance cut. The lighthouse marks the end of the Long Point Peninsula, a 40 km (25 mi) long finger of sand extending due east into Lake Ontario. Most of the peninsula is an ecological reserve, and there is no public land access to the light station. Accessible only by boat. Site open, if you can get to it by water; tower closed. Owner: Canadian Coast Guard. Site manager: Long Point World Biosphere Reserve. ARLHS CAN-759; USCG 7-6785; CCG 579.

Elgin County Lighthouses
**** Port Burwell
1840. Inactive since 1963 (a decorative light is displayed). 20 m (65 ft) octagonal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white with red trim; lantern and gallery painted red. A 3rd order Fresnel lens is still in place in the lantern. Bash's photo is at right, Anderson has several photos, Corey Seeman has a 2008 photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. In 1986 the lighthouse was beautifully restored by Mennonite craftspeople using authentic construction techniques. The Port Burwell Marine Museum, across the street, has a large collection of lighthouse lenses and artifacts, including the 3rd order Fresnel lens and rotating mechanism from Long Point Light. Located on the waterfront in Port Burwell. Site open; museum open daily from mid-May to Labor Day, except closed on non-holiday Mondays and on Tuesdays after holiday Mondays during May, June, and September. Tower open for climbing whenever the museum is open (small fee). Owner: Municipality of Bayham. Site manager: Port Burwell Marine Museum. ARLHS CAN-405.
* Port Burwell Approach (West Pier)
1914. Inactive since the late 1990s. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal concrete tower topped by a short skeletal tower. Anderson has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. This light was replaced by a light at the end of a new breakwater on the other side of the harbor entrance. Located at the end of a pier on the west side of the entrance to Otter Creek at Port Burwell. Accessible by walking the pier. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-1041.
Port Stanley Breakwater
1908. Active; focal plane 11 m (37 ft); green flash every 5 s. 9.5 m (31 ft), steel skeletal tower mounted atop a 1-story square pyramidal concrete structure. Lighthouse painted white. Deborah Knott has a photo, Anderson has a photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the outer end of the breakwater on the west side of the harbor entrance at Port Stanley in Central Elgin. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-622; CCG 588.

Chatham-Kent Municipality South Coast Lighthouses
* Rondeau East Pier
1905. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); red flash every 4 s. 11 m (36 ft) square pyramidal skeletal steel tower with lantern and gallery. Tower and gallery painted white, lantern red. Anderson has photos, Val West has a 2008 photo, Renée Laliberte has a similar photo, and Google has a very distant satellite view. Located at the end of the east breakwater at the entrance to Rondeau Harbour in Ereiau. Accessible only by boat (the breakwater does not connect to shore); easily visible from the west pier across the entrance. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-636; CCG 591.
Port Burwell Light
Port Burwell Light, Port Burwell, January 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C. W. Bash
* Rondeau West Breakwater Range Front
1912. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); green flash every 5 s. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal white concrete tower; there is a small gallery but no lantern. Val West has a photo, Stephen Herr has a photo, Anderson has photos, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a very distant satellite view. Located at the end of the west breakwater at the entrance to Rondeau Harbour in Erieau. Parking available nearby. Accessible in good weather by walking the breakwater. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-623; CCG 592.
* Rondeau West Breakwater Range Rear
Date uncertain. Active; focal plane 18 m (60 ft); continuous green light. 16 m (53 ft) square pyramidal steel tower, painted white; no lantern. The tower also carries a triangular daymark, painted orange with a black vertical stripe. Anderson has a photo (third photo on the page). This light is located directly across the entrance channel from the east pier light. Parking available nearby. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1339; CCG 593.

Essex County South Coast Lighthouses
Southeast Shoal
1927 (lightship station established 1901). Active; focal plane 21 m (70 ft); red flash every 10 s. 18 m (60 ft) square 3-story concrete building mounted on a square pyramidal base; lantern replaced by a helicopter landing pad. Lighthouse painted white with red trim. Anderson has photos, and Lighthouse Explorer has an aerial photo. This lighthouse was gutted by a disastrous explosion and fire on July 7, 1950. The Lake Carriers Association chartered a private lightship for the shoal in 1901; it was replaced by an official lightship station in 1910. Located at the south end of a dangerous shoal extending south from Pélee Point into the Pélee Passage. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-468; USCG 7-6795; CCG 597.
Pelée Passage (3)
1975 (station established 1861). Active; focal plane 28 m (91 ft); white flash every 4 s. 12 m (40 ft) round cylindrical steel (?) tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one corner of a 1-story keeper's quarters with a helipad on its roof, all mounted on a cylindrical steel caisson. Tower and building painted white, lantern and caisson green. Anderson has good photos. The second (1902) lighthouse has been relocated to Lakeview Park in Windsor (see listing below). The lighthouse marks the north end of the Middle Ground Shoal about 8 km (5 mi) northwest of Southeast Shoal, between Pelée Point and Pelée Island. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-371; USCG 7-6835; CCG 602.
Pelée Island
1833. Inactive since 1909. Approx. 18 m (60 ft) round rubblestone tower with lantern and gallery. The tower is unpainted stone; lantern painted black. A photo appears at the top of this page, Anderson has a photo, Wikipedia has a photo, and a closeup photo is available, but Google has only a very fuzzy satellite view of the area. This historic but long-abandoned lighthouse fell into picturesque ruins before it was rescued by the Relight the Lighthouse Committee in a restoration in 1999-2000. However, the tower is still shored up by timbers and the lighthouse is threatened by wave action; riprap has been piled around the tower to protect it. Pelée Island, the largest island in Lake Erie, has a permanent population of about 250. Located on Lighthouse Point at the northern tip of Pelée Island. Accessible by a walk of at least 1.5 km (1 mi) from the end of East Shore Road. Pelée Island is accessible by ferries from Kingsville and Leamington, Ontario, and from Sandusky, Ohio. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Ontario Parks (Lighthouse Point Provincial Nature Reserve). Site manager: Relight the Lighthouse Committee. ARLHS CAN-370.
[Middle Island]
1872. Inactive since 1918. The lighthouse, a 15 m (49 ft) square pyramidal wood tower attached to a keeper's house, burned sometime after deactivation, but the stone foundation can be seen. No current photo available, but a good description of the island and its history is available. Middle Island, located 11 km (7 mi) east of Middle Bass Island, Ohio, is the southernmost point of Canada. Formerly private, the island was bought by the Nature Conservancy in 1999 as an addition to Point Pelée National Park. Accessible only by boat. Site open. Owner/site manager: Point Pelée National Park. ARLHS CAN-1076.
* Leamington
1880s. Inactive since 1923. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square pyramidal wood tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern painted red. Bash's photo is at right, Anderson has closeup photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Owned by an association of small summer cottage owners, the lighthouse has been converted to provide restrooms for club members. Located just west of Erie Street South and just north of the Pelée Island ferry terminal in Leamington. Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse can be seen easily from the park. Owner/site manager: Leamington Lighthouse Club. ARLHS CAN-758.
* Kingsville Range Rear
1889. Inactive since 1936. Approx. 7.5 m (25 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white; lantern painted gray. Anderson has good photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Some sources give 1886 as the establishment date. After deactivation, the lighthouse was sold into private ownership and incorporated into a cottage. Later donated to the village, it was displayed from 1973 to 1991 at Lakeside Park, and then it was moved again to the Kingsville Historical Park. Badly deteriorated by that time, it was repaired in 1995. A thorough restoration of the lighthouse was completed in 2003. Located north of Maple Street between Lansdowne Avenue and Division Street, south of ON 18 in Kingsville. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Kingsville Historical Park. ARLHS CAN-756.
Colchester Reef (3)
Date unknown (station established 1885; lightship station established 1870s). Active; focal plane 22 m (72 ft); red flash every 4 s. 12 m (39 ft) square steel skeletal tower mounted atop the cylindrical stone pier of the 1885 lighthouse. The tower also carries a horizontally slatted daymark. Entire structure painted red. Anderson's page has photos of the current lighthouse and the original lighthouse. Michel Forand also has a historic photo of the original lighthouse. Lighthouse Explorer has Stan Severi's photo of the second (1954) lighthouse, which was cantilevered off one side of the pier to make room for a helicopter landing pad. Located at the south end of the reef about 6 km (4 mi) south of Colchester. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-143; USCG 7-6870; CCG 620.
Leamington Light
Leamington Light, Leamington, January 2004
Flickr Creative Commons photo by C. W. Bash

Detroit River Lighthouses

Note: The Detroit River is 44 km (28 mi) long, varying in width from 0.8 to 4 km (0.5-2.5 mi). The U.S. city of Detroit is on the west side of the river, across from the Canadian city of Windsor. Detroit takes its name from the French word détroit, meaning a strait, because the river functions as a strait connecting Lake Erie to the much smaller Lake St. Clair. The river falls only 1 meter (3 ft) between the two lakes.
Essex County West Coast Lighthouses
Bar Point Pier
1962. Active; focal plane 14 m (46 ft); green flash every 10 s. 6 m (20 ft) round cylindrical tower mounted on a 1-story concrete workroom. Entire structure painted white. Bing has a distant satellite view. This light is very similar to the better-known Livingstone Channel Upper Entrance Light (see below). Located on a square concrete pier on the west side of the entrance channel to the river from Lake Erie, off Bar Point southeast of Willow Beach. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1008; USCG 7-6995; CCG 642.
Bar Point Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 18.5 m (60 ft); continuous yellow light. 16.5 m (54 ft) square skeletal tower, painted white. Greenia has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the Bar Point Dyke, off the east bank of the river south of Amherstburg. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. USCG 7-7005; CCG 649.
Boblo Island
1837. Inactive since the late 1950s. 12 m (40 ft) round limestone tower, painted white; lantern destroyed. Linda Goodhue has a 2009 closeup, a 2012 closeup and a view from the river are available, Anderson has distant photos, and Google has a satellite view. Vandals set a fire in 1954 that gutted the tower and destroyed the lantern. The lighthouse is on the Lighthouse Digest Doomsday List, although the tower itself appears to be in sound condition; the danger is from continued vandalism. The lighthouse provides an early example of what later became the "Imperial Tower" style of Canadian lighthouses. Parks Canada, which has owned the lighthouse since 1961, has a page on its history. The park service has stabilized the building, and the tower appeared to have been recently painted in a 2005 photo. However, there are no plans to provide any public access. Most of the island is occupied by an upscale residential community accessed from Amherstburg by a private ferry. Note: "Boblo" is a corruption of "Bois Blanc" (white wood), a reference to birch trees on the island. Located near the southern tip of the island. Site and tower closed; the lighthouse can be seen from Front Street South, Amherstburg. Owner: Parks Canada. Site manager: Bois Blanc Island Lighthouse National Historic Site. ARLHS CAN-049.
* Hackett Reach Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); continuous red light. Approx. 22 m (72 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower, painted white. The tower also carries an inverted triangular slatted daymark, painted orange. Noah Greenia has a closeup photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the foot of Park Street in Amherstburg, adjacent to the sales center for homes on Boblo Island. Site open, tower closed. USCG 7-7025; CCG 657.
Livingstone Channel Upper Entrance (3)
About 1980 (station established 1915). Active; focal plane 12 m (40 ft); white flash every 10 s. Round cylindrical steel tower without lantern, rising from the center of a 1-story workroom, mounted on a square crib. Entire structure painted white with red trim. Noah Greenia has posted a closeup photo, Lighthouse Explorer has a Coast Guard photo, and Google has an aerial view. The original lighthouse was overturned by the freighter E.J. Kulas in September 1952. Located in the river north of Amherstburg. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1038; USCG 7-7195; CCG 677.
Ballard Reef (Livingstone Channel Light D77)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); green flash every 5 s. 11 m (36 ft) square cylindrical tower centered on a square 1-story workroom, mounted on a round concrete pier. Lighthouse painted white with green vertical stripes at the corners of the tower. Noah Greenia has a closeup photo, and Google has an aerial view. The "D" is for "downbound": this channel is for downbound (southbound) vessels. Located about 600 m (0.4 mi) north northwest of the Livingstone Channel Upper Entrance Light. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Owner/site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. USCG 7-7200; CCG 678.

Windsor City Lighthouse
* Pelee Passage (2)
1902. Inactive since 1975. Approx. 18 m (60 ft) round steel tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with red trim; lantern is red. Prasan Naik's photo is at right, Martin Crest has a closeup photo, Anderson has photos, Shultheiss has good photos by Ian McInnis, a 2008 photo is available, and Google has a street view and an aerial view. The lighthouse was relocated in 1980 to a site on the Detroit River in Windsor. Located on Riverside Drive East at Riverdale Avenue, opposite Peche Island, about 10 km (6 mi) east of the downtown tunnel. Site open, tower closed. Owner: City of Windsor. Site manager: Lakeview Park Marina.
Pelee Passage Light
1902 Pelee Passage Light, Windsor, April 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Prasan Naik

Lake St. Clair and St. Clair River Lighthouses

Note: Lake St. Clair is a shallow lake about 40 km (25 mi) in diameter. A navigation channel has been dredged northeast to southwest across the lake, connecting the inflowing St. Clair River to the outflowing Detroit River. The St. Clair River, which connects Lake Huron to Lake St. Clair, is 65 km (40 mi) long, dropping only 2 m (5 ft) in elevation between the two lakes.
Chatham-Kent Municipality West Coast Lighthouses
* Thames River Range Rear (2)
1818 (reconstructed 1973-75; station established 1810). Reactivated (inactive 1966-75). Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); continuous red light. 16.5 m (54 ft) round limestone tower, painted white with red trim; lantern painted red. Corey Seeman's photo is at right, he also has a 2013 photo, another photo is available, and Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view but only a very distant satellite view. A photo showing both range lights is also available; the front light is on a cylindrical metal tower. Ontario's second oldest lighthouse, after Gibraltar Point. Its height was raised from about 11 m (35 ft) around 1870. The lighthouse was in very poor condition, leaning and cracked, before being restored in 1973-75 by the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority. The lighthouse was taken down, stone by stone, and rebuilt on a restored foundation. The site is leased to the Coast Guard for a search and rescue station. Located on the south side of the mouth of the river, just off Lake St. Clair; the lighthouse is off Harbour Drive in Lighthouse Cove. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority (Lighthouse Conservation Area). Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-594; CCG 713.
Maybury Highway
1928. Active; focal plane 7 m (24 ft); red flash every 4 s. 5.5 m (18 ft) square pyramidal concrete tower built on a small square crib. No lantern. Bing has a satellite view. Located on the south side of the St. Clair Flats Channel, which is also the international border, at the south entrance to the St. Clair River. Accessible only by boat; should be visible from a residential area on the U.S. side. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1015; USCG 7-9605; CCG 734.
Southeast Bend
1913. Active; focal plane 7 m (23 ft); red flash every 4 s. 6.5 m (21 ft) square pyramidal concrete tower built on a small square crib. No lantern. Bing has a satellite view. Located on the south side of the St. Clair Flats Channel, which is also the international border, at the south entrance to the river. Accessible only by boat; should be visible from a residential area on the U.S. side. Site and tower closed. Site manager: Canadian Coast Guard. ARLHS CAN-1023; USCG 7-9645; CCG 736.

Lambton County Lighthouses
* Corunna Range Rear
1892. Inactive 1941-1951 and since 1982. 13 m (42 ft) square pyramidal wood tower, painted white. No lantern, but the tower is surmounted by a diamond-shaped slatted daymark. Lighthouse Explorer has a Moore Museum photo, and Google has a street view and an indistinct satellite view. Originally located on the St. Clair River at the end of Cameron Street in Corunna, the lighthouse has been relocated to the grounds of the Moore Museum, located at 94 Moore Line, off ON 40 in Mooretown. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Moore Museum. ARLHS CAN-1029.
Thames River Range Rear Light
Thames River Range Rear Light, Tilbury, July 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Corey Seeman
* [Point Edward Range Front (3)]
Date unknown (station established 1903). Active; focal plane 13 m (42 ft); continuous red light. 9.5 m (31 ft) round cylindrical "Claymar" tower, painted white. The tower also carries a triangular slatted daymerk, painted orange with a black vertical stripe. Bash has a 2008 photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Huelse has a postcard view of the original Point Edward Light (notice the U.S. Gratiot Point Light in the distance). It was demolished after being replaced by a skeletal tower in 1959. The range guides vessels approaching the St. Clair River entrance at the southern end of Lake Huron. The rear light is mounted on the Blue Water Bridge where it crosses Alexandra Avenue. Located at the northern end of Fort Street in Point Edward, opposite the Fort Gratiot lighthouse in the U.S. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS CAN-795; CCG 768.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: North: West Central Ontario | Northeast: Southeastern Ontario | East: Upstate New York | West: Eastern Lower Michigan

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Posted December 16, 2003. Checked and revised December 13, 2013. Lighthouses: 31. Site copyright 2013 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.