Lighthouses of Australia: Northern and Central Queensland

Queensland, the state at the northeastern corner of Australia, has a long, tropical coastline facing the Coral Sea and fringed by the famous Great Barrier Reef. This coastline ends at Cape York, the northernmost point of the Australian continent. Beyond Cape York, the Torres Strait separates Australia from New Guinea and provides a passage from the Coral Sea (which is part of the Pacific Ocean) to the Arafura Sea (the easternmost arm of the Indian Ocean). This page includes lighthouses of the Coral Sea coast from the Townsville region south through the Gladstone region. For the Cape York Peninsula lighthouses see the page for Queensland's Far North.

Most of the older lighthouses in Queensland are simple wood frame towers covered by iron sheets, like the Bulwer Island Light at right. These towers were built in the late 1800s, when there was a need to build a great many lighthouses on the Queensland coast as quickly as possible. Remarkably, at least 16 of these inexpensive lighthouses have survived to the present, and 9 remain active.

Coastal lighthouses in Australia are operated by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), but after automation AMSA transferred many of the station properties to the control of local or state authorities or organizations.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume K of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 111.

General Sources
Lighthouses of Queensland
The section of the Lighthouses of Australia site devoted to Queensland lights.
Lighthouses and Lightvessels in Australia - Queensland
Index to Wikipedia articles; most include photos.
World of Lighthouses - Queensland
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Leuchttürme in Australien
Photos posted by Andreas Köhler.
Lighthouses from the Air - Part 6 and Part 7
Feature articles from the February and March 2002 Lighthouses of Australia Bulletin, including aerial photos of many of the lighthouses.
Around Australia Chasing Lighthouses - Part 2
John Ibbotson's article from the December 2000 Lighthouses of Australia Bulletin, including closeup photos of lighthouses in northern Queensland.
Annette Flotwell's East Coast Lighthouse Trip - Part 1 and Part 2
Feature articles from the September 2001 and August 2003 Lighthouses of Australia Bulletin, including photos of many of the lighthouses.
Online List of Lights - Australia
Coming soon: photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.

Bustard Head Light
Bustard Head Light, Seventeen Seventy, May 2009
Flickr photo copyright Dave Taylor; used by permission

Palm Passage Lighthouses
Pith Reef
1979. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 25 m (82 ft) skeletal tower mounted on a square platform supported by piles. A photo is available, but Google has only a distant satellite view of the reef. The reef is a popular destination for scuba divers. This light and the next one guide vessels through the Palm Passage, a narrow break in the Great Barrier Reef that allows ships to reach Lucinda and Townsville. Located on the Great Barrier Reef about 80 km (50 mi) east of Lucinda. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. Admiralty K3120.5; NGA 10004.
Rib Reef
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); two white flashes every 8 s. 9 m (30 ft) white fiberglass lantern structure atop a concrete "column." No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located about 30 km (19 mi) southwest of the Pith Reef Light. Operator/site manager: AMSA. Admiralty K3120.7; NGA 10008.

Townsville Area Lighthouses
* Lucinda Point Range Rear
Date unknown (station established 1897). Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); continuous light, red at night and white in the daytime. 21 m (69 ft) square cylindrical tower. Chris Ring has a closeup photo, Google has a distant street view, and Bing has a satellite view. An aerial photo shows the tower at the base of Lucinda's famous 5.7 km (3.6 mi) long jetty, the world's largest bulk sugar loading facility. Located in Lucinda, a small town 115 km (72 mi) northwest of Townsville. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K3124.1; NGA 10016.
* Forrest Beach (Allingham)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane about 35 m (115 ft); white flash every 2.5 s. 33 m (108 ft) round water tower painted white. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at Leichhardt and Wattle Streets in Forrest Beach, a beach town about 85 km (53 mi) northwest of Townsville. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: unknown. Admiralty K3119; NGA 10026.
Albino Rock
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 26 m (85 ft); three white flashes every 20 s. 5 m (16 ft) square white concrete tower. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on a rocky islet at the extreme southeast end of the Palm Islands, southeast of Lucinda and about 50 km (30 mi) north of Townsville. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K3120; NGA 10028.
* Bay Rock (1) (relocated to Townsville)
1886. Inactive since the early 1980s. 8 m (26 ft) wood frame tower covered by galvanized iron sheets, with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is red. Wikipedia has an article including a historic photo and Mark McIntosh's photo at right, Köhler has a photo, and Google has a closeup street view and a satellite view. This lighthouse was originally located atop a rocky islet on the northwest side of Magnetic Island about 20 km (13 mi) north of Townsville; it was replaced there by a small fiberglass beacon. In 1992 it was relocated to the Townsville Maritime Museum, where it was restored by Queensland Transport. The museum was expanded and refurbished in 2001; it exhibits a collection of Fresnel lenses from the former Penrith Island, Albino Rock, Heath Reef, and Duyfken Point lighthouses. Located on the south side of Ross Creek near downtown Townsville. Site open; museum open daily. Owner/site manager: Townsville Maritime Museum. ARLHS AUS-266; ex-Admiralty K3117.
* Platypus Channel Range Rear (Max Hooper) (2)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 20 m (66 ft); continuous blue light; also a red light, 1 s on, 1 s off, and in the daytime a continuous white light. Approx. 18 m (56 ft) steel tower painted white. Google has a street view and a satellite view. This is the entrance range for Townsville. The Townsville Maritime Museum also has a collection of two former range light towers; a street view shows them standing near the present light. The modern light is a sibling of the Bribie Island Rear Light at Caloundra (see below). Located about 100 m (110 yd) east of the historic Bay Rock Light (previous entry). Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K3100.1; NGA 10062.1.
* Wharton Reef (1) (relocated to Townsville)
1915. Inactive since 1990. Approx. 9 m (30 ft) square steel skeletal tower with lantern and gallery, painted bright red. Rebecca Weeks has a closeup photo, Wikipedia has an article on the lighthouse, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The lighthouse was originally 15 m (50 ft) high and mounted on concrete piers on Wharton Reef in Princess Charlotte Bay off the Cape York Peninsula. It is the only survivor of a series of 20 acetylene-burning automatic lights built along the northern inside passage (inside the Great Barrier Reef) between 1915 and 1920. After it was replaced with a modern fiberglass light, it was donated to the Townsville Maritime Museum and located in the middle of a traffic roundabout at Palmer and Plume Streets, near the museum. Site open, tower closed. Owner: Townsville Maritime Museum. Site manager: Townsville City Council. ARLHS AUS-265; ex-Admiralty K3226.
Bay Rock Light
Bay Rock Light, Townsville, November 2009
Wikipedia Creative Commons photo by Mark McIntosh
Cape Cleveland
1879. Active; focal plane 64 m (210 ft); white flash every 7.5 s; a red flash is shown in a sector over Four Foot Rock. 11 m (36 ft) wood frame tower covered by galvanized iron sheets, with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is red. Two 1-story keeper's houses and other light station buildings. A photo is at right, a 2008 photo is available, Kevin Mulcahy has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Not be confused with the Point Cleveland Light in Redland (see below). This was formerly the rear light of a range, but the range has been discontinued. Cape Cleveland is a long, narrow promontory projecting northward into the Coral Sea about 40 km (25 mi) east of Townsville. Located on the point of the cape. Accessible only by boat or helicopter. Site and tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-027; Admiralty K3092.1; NGA 10096.
Cape Bowling Green (2)
1987 (station established 1874). Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); four white flashes every 20 s. 32 m (105 ft) square cylindrical steel skeletal tower with a square lantern structure and gallery. Lighthouse painted white with a red horizontal band at the top of the tower. Winsome Bonham has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. The original lighthouse, a 16 m (52 ft) iron tower, was dismantled and relocated to the Australian National Maritime Museum at Darling Harbour in Sydney (see New South Wales). Cape Bowling Green is a lengthy promonotory, ending in a long, trailing sand spit, about 30 km (19 mi) north of Ayr. Located at the end of the higher portion of the promontory, near the base of the spit. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Queensland National Parks (Bowling Green Bay National Park). ARLHS AUS-023; Admiralty K3090; NGA 10108.

Bowen Area Lighthouses
Abbot Point East Approach Range Rear
1984 (?). Active; focal plane 55 m (180 ft); white flash every 4 s. No description or photo available, but Bing's satellite view shows that the light is mounted on a water tower. Tower painted white. Abbot Point is a large coal shipping port completed in 1984. Located on a bluff above the port, about 25 km (15 mi) north of Bowen. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K3082.9; NGA 10125.4.
North Head Island (Bowen, Port Denison) (?)
1867. Inactive since 1985. Approx. 11 m (35 ft) tapered hexagonal wood lighthouse with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern dome is red. The original Fresnel lens is displayed at the Bowen Historical Society and Museum. A 2009 photo is available, Winsome Bonham has an excellent aerial photo, Al Sweet has a distant view, and Bing has a satellite view. This is the original lighthouse, seen in an 1876 photo, although the gallery has been altered. A committee has been formed in Bowen to work for restoration of the lighthouse, and an engineering study was underway in 2013. In April 2016 the Whitsunday Regional Council appropriated $100,000 to restore the lighthouse in time for its 150th anniversary. Located on North Head Island, a rocky island about 5 km (3 mi) east of Bowen. The active light (focal plane 27 m (87 ft); flash every 4 s, white or red depending on direction) is located on Stone Island, a larger island to the southeast, on the other side of the Port Denison entrance channel. Accessible only by boat. Site status and site manager unknown. ARLHS AUS-242; Stone Island Light: Admiralty K3070, NGA 10133.
Cape Cleveland
Cape Cleveland Light, Townsville, September 2008
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by bauplenut
Dent Island
1879. Active; focal plane 37 m (127 ft); white flash every 5 s. 10 m (33 ft) wood frame tower covered by galvanized iron sheets, with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is red. Several 1-story keeper's houses are now privately owned. Wikipedia has an article that includes J. Warnes's 2007 aerial photo (also seen at right), and Google has a satellite view. Dent Island is one of the smaller islands of the Whitsunday Islands east of Cannonvale. Neighboring Hamilton Island has a settlement and airstrip, but Dent Island is privately owned. Located on the west side of the island, marking the Dent Island Passage. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed (private). Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-188; Admiralty K3064; NGA 10204.

Hydrographer's Passage Lighthouses
Note: The Hydrographer's Passage is a 100 km (60 mi) long passage through the heart of the Great Barrier Reef. The Passage was surveyed by the Royal Australian Navy in 1981 to provide a direct connection between Mackay and other north Queensland ports and the Coral Sea. The route was opened to navigation in 1984, but ships using it must be guided by licensed pilots.
White Tip Reef Range Front
1985. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); white or red light depending on direction, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off. 12 m (39 ft) lantern mounted on a square equipment shelter on a square platform supported by robust concrete piles. Equipment shelter painted red. This is the inbound entrance range for the Hydrographer's Passage. Located near the outer edge of the barrier reef about 170 km (105 mi) northeast of Mackay. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K3054; NGA 10231.
Dent Island Light
Dent Island Light, Whitsunday Islands, August 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by J. Warnes
White Tip Reef Range Rear
1985. Active; focal plane 37 m (121 ft); white flash every 10 s. 37 m (121 ft) skeletal tower on a concrete pile structure. The tower also carries a large orange square daymark facing the range line. The light is not seen in Google's fuzzy satellite view. Located about 2 km (1.25 mi) south southwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K3054.1; NGA 10231.1.
Little Bugatti Reef
1985. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); flash every 5 s, white, red or green depending on direction. 22 m (72 ft) skeletal tower on a concrete pile structure. The tower also carries a large orange square daymark. No photo available, and the light is not seen in Google's fuzzy satellite view of the reef. This light guides ships on the Hydrographer's Passage. Located about 13 km (8 mi) south of the White Tip Reef Range Rear Light. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K3053; NGA 10230.
Bugatti Reef
1980s. Active; focal plane 9 m (30 ft); two white flashes every 8 s. 10 m (33 ft) round cylindrical white concrete tower with gallery. J. Warnes has a photo, but the light is not seen in Google's fuzzy satellite view of the reef. Located about 10 km (6 mi) southeast of the Little Bugatti Reef Light. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K3056; NGA 10229.5.
Creal Reef
1985. Active; focal plane 32 m (105 ft); white flash every 7.5 s. 31 m (102 ft) skeletal tower on a concrete pile structure. The tower also carries a large orange square daymark. Google has only a fuzzy satellite view of the reef. This light guides outbound ships entering the Hydrographer's Passage. Located on a reef about 150 km (95 mi) east of Mackay. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K3052; NGA 10229.

Mackay Area Lighthouses
Bailey Island (Bailey Islet) (2?)
Date unknown (station established 1928). Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); white flash every 5 s. Approx. 7 m (23 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower, painted white. J. Warnes has an aerial photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a small island about 50 km (30 mi) northeast of Mackay. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Admiralty K3048; NGA 10224.
Penrith Island
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 150 m (492 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 4 m (13 ft) square masonry tower painted white. No photo available, but Bing has a satellite view of the station. A Fresnel lens from this lighthouse is on display at the Townsville Maritime Museum. Located on the summit of Penrith, a wilderness island located about 80 km (50 mi) east of Mackay. Site status unknown. Site manager: South Cumberland Islands National Park. ARLHS AUS-192; Admiralty K3049; NGA 10228.
Flat Top Island (2)
1879 (station established 1874). Inactive since 2007. 10 m (32 ft) wood frame tower covered by galvanized iron sheets, with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern dome is red. A 2017 view from the sea is available, Wikipedia has an article with a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view. Probably endangered; no plans to relocate or conserve this historic lighthouse have been announced. Located on a rugged island off the entrance to Mackay harbor. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Operator: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-190; ex-Admiralty K3028; ex-NGA 10232.
** Pine Islet (1) (relocated to Mackay)
1885. Inactive since 1985. 10.5 m (35 ft) wood frame tower covered by galvanized iron sheets, with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is red. Wikipedia has an article that includes Burkhard Westphal's photo seen at right, Bill Strong's 2007 photo shows the lighthouse in excellent condition, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This lighthouse was originally located on an island in the Percy Group about 130 km (80 mi) southeast of Mackay. After deactivation, the lighthouse was slated for relocation to the National Maritime Museum in Sydney. Mackay residents fought this idea and formed the Pine Islet Lighthouse Preservation Society to relocate the lighthouse to Mackay, where it has been on display since 1995. The lighthouse has been fully restored and has an operational kerosene-powered light. In 2004 the lighthouse was repainted by the Mackay Port Authority. Located at Mackay Marina on the waterfront in Mackay Harbour. Site open; tours of the lighthouse available. Site manager: Pine Islet Lighthouse Preservation Society. ARLHS AUS-127.
* [Mackay Breakwater (Bagley Point)]
1996. Active; focal plane 8 m (26 ft); red light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 4.5 m (15 ft) round conical white concrete tower. A photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. The light has a plaque in memory of Charles F. Bagley, longtime chairman of the Mackay Harbour Board. Located on the south (main) breakwater of Mackay. Accessible by walking or driving the pier. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K3035; NGA 10268.
Pine Islet Light
1885 Pine Islet Light, Mackay, August 2006
Wikipedia Creative Commons photo by Burkhard Westphal
* Hay Point Lookout
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 78 m (256 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. Light mounted on the 2-story harbor control building of the Hay Point Coal Terminal. A photo (third row of photos, on the right) is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Hay Point, located about 40 km (25 mi) southeast of Mackay, is one of the world's largest coal terminals. The harbor control building includes exhibits and an observation deck; parking is provided. Located on a steep ridge overlooking the terminals. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K3024; NGA 10282.

Fitzroy (Gladstone) Area Lighthouses
[Pine Peak Island]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 46 m (151 ft); two white flashes every 6 s. 3 m (10 ft) tripod on a concrete base resting on a large white rock; connected by a ladder to a small equipment cabinet beside the rock. J. Warnes has a photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a high, forested island about 100 km (60 mi) southeast of Mackay. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. Admiralty K3022; NGA 10292.
Pine Islet (2) (Percy Isles)
1985 (station established 1885). Active; focal plane 67 m (220 ft); white flash every 10 s. 6 m (20 ft) round fiberglass tower; no lantern. The 1-story keeper's house, painted white with a green roof, survives at this historic light station. Winsome Bonham has an aerial photo, and Google has a distant satellite view. Located in the Percy Isles about 130 km (80 mi) southeast of Mackay. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. Admiralty K3020; NGA 10304.
Swain Reefs (Hixson Cay)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); white flash every 10 s. 17 m (56 ft) round white fiberglass tower mounted on a square platform supported by piles. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. The Swain Reefs lie at the extreme southeastern end of the outer Great Barrier Reef. Located on a reef near the southern tip of the reefs. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K3014.5; NGA 10311.
Balaclava Island Range Front (2)
1932 (station established 1884). Active; focal plane 17 m (56 ft); quick-flashing white light. 17 m (56 ft) square pyramidal wood skeletal tower with gallery. Lighthouse painted white. The lighthouse also carries a triangular slatted daymark, point up, painted white with a black vertical stripe on the range line. Google has a satellite view. The range guides vessels entering Keppel Bay and Fitzroy River. Located on the north shore of Balaclava Island and the south shore of Keppel Bay, about 60 km (36 mi) northwest of Gladstone, near Port Alma. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: unknown. ARLHS AUS-291; Admiralty K3002; NGA 10324.
Balaclava Island Range Rear (2)
1932 (station established 1884). Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 27 m (89 ft) square pyramidal wood skeletal tower with gallery. Lighthouse painted white. The lighthouse also carries a rectangular slatted daymark, painted white, and a triangular slatted daymark, point down, painted white with a black vertical stripe on the range line. Google has a satellite view. The range guides vessels entering Keppel Bay and Fitzroy River. Located 1.6 km (1 mi) south southwest of the front light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: unknown. ARLHS AUS-292; Admiralty K3002.1; NGA 10328.
North Reef
1878. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); two white flashes, separated by 5 s, every 15 s. 24 m (78 ft) wood frame tower covered by galvanized iron sheets, with lantern and gallery; circular 1-story keeper's house, also wood frame covered by galvanized iron sheets, surrounds the base of the tower. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is red. An aerial view by J. Warnes is at right, Wikipedia has an article with another aerial view, and Google has a distant satellite view. The reef was nearly awash when the lighthouse was built but has since stabilized as a vegetated island. Located about 120 km (75 mi) northeast of Gladstone. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-122; Admiralty K3014; NGA 10312.
North Reef Light
North Reef Light, Great Barrier Reef, August 2007
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by J. Warnes
Sea Hill (2) (Range Rear)
1895. Active (?); focal plane 33 m (108 ft); two white flashes every 6 s. Approx. 13 m (43 ft) round corrugated iron tower with lantern and gallery. Wikipedia has Peter Marquis Kyle's 2011 photo, Capt. Ian McIlwraith has a 2007 photo, and Google has a satellite view. Endangered. The Internet has carried conflicting reports on the status and recent history of this lighthouse. There was a report that this lighthouse was deactivated in 2006 and another that it was demolished in 2009. Fortunately these reports were false. According to Wikipedia, the lighthouse was standing but not active in 2014. Current and accurate information is needed! The lighthouse marked the east side of the entrance to Keppel Bay. It was accompanied by a pilot station, which closed in 1963. It supplemented an 1873 lighthouse now in the collection of the Gladstone Maritime Museum (see below). The two lighthouses functioned as a range until the 1920s; Wikipedia has a historic photo of the two towers in 1908. Located on a promontory at the northwestern point of Curtis Island. Site open. Site manager: Queensland National Parks (Curtis Island National Park). ARLHS AUS-196; Admiralty K3000; NGA 10320.
Cape Capricorn (3)
1964 (station established 1875). Active; focal plane 93 m (305 ft); flash every 5 s, white or red depending on direction. 7 m (23 ft) concrete block tower with gallery, painted white; lantern removed. Two 1-story keeper's houses are leased to private tenants. A photo shows the lighthouse after the removal of the lantern. Wikipedia has an article with a photo, a closeup photo and a view from the sea are available, and Google has a satellite view. The original corrugated iron tower was replaced by a concrete block lighthouse in 1938. Located on the northeast point of Curtis Island 24 km (15 mi) north of Gladstone. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Queensland National Parks (Curtis Island National Park). ARLHS AUS-026; Admiralty K2992.1; NGA 10336.
*Sea Hill (1) (Range Front) (relocated to Gladstone)
1873. Inactive since the 1960s. 6 m (20 ft) square corrugated iron tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white, lantern dome red. A photo is at right, the Wikipedia article has Vicki Nunn's closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view. This is apparently the oldest of Queensland's corrugated iron lighthouses. Originally located at the northwest point of Curtis Island, this small lighthouse was moved in the 1920s to Grassy Hill, at Station Point, about 6 km (3.5 mi) northeast. Deactivated in the 1960s, it was sold into private hands but later came into the possession of the Gladstone Maritime Museum. In 2014 the lighthouse was moved to a new display in the East Shore waterfront development project on Auckland Creek, a short distance west of the museum. The museum has a photo. Located on the quay next to the historic corvette HMAS Gladstone. Site open, tower closed. Owner/site manager: Gladstone Maritime Museum.

HMAS Gladstone (being lifted into its berth) and 1873 Sea Hill Light, Gladstone
Gladstone Maritime Museum photo
East Point (Facing Island)
1980. Active; focal plane 47 m (154 ft); white flash every 10 s. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical skeletal tower with double gallery and a white fiberglass lantern structure. A photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. Located atop a dune at the southeastern corner of Facing Island, which shelters the harbor of Gladstone. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K2972; NGA 10352.
* Lady Musgrave Islet
1974. Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); white flash every 2 s. 17 m (56 ft) square skeletal tower with double gallery. J.R. Gonthier has a photo, Wikipedia has an article on the island with a sunset photo of the light, and Google has a distant satellite view. Transportation is available from Seventeen Seventy to this very popular island of the Southern Great Barrier Reef, the southernmost islet of the Capricornia Cays. Located on the southernmost island of a reef about 80 km (50 mi) east of Seventeen Seventy. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Queensland National Parks (Capricornia Cays National Park). Admiralty K2963; NGA 10448.
** Bustard Head
1869. Active; focal plane 102 m (336 ft); two white flashes, separated by 3 s, every 10 s. 17.5 m (58 ft) wood frame tower covered by cast iron panels, with lantern and gallery, painted white; lantern dome is red. Two 1-story keeper's houses (1920s) and other light station buildings. Dave Taylor's photo is at the top of this page, Isabelle Henry has a good photo, Wikipedia has an article with several historic photos, and Google has a satellite view. The Bustard Head Lighthouse Association was formed to work for preservation of the light station after it was automated in 1986, and in 2001 the Association leased the station reserve from AMSA. The buildings are being restored through the efforts of volunteers. In March 2013, the station was opened to guided tours from Seventeen Seventy. The light station is within the Eurimbula National Park. Located on a headland about 20 km (13 mi) northwest of the town of Seventeen Seventy (the name commemorating Captain Cook's landing here in that year). Accessible by 4WD vehicles; guided tours available daily. Site and tower open to tours via amphibious vehicles. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Bustard Head Lighthouse Association. ARLHS AUS-017; Admiralty K2964; NGA 10452.

Information available on lost lighthouses:

Notable faux lighthouses:

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Adjoining pages: North: Queensland's Far North | East: Coral Sea Islands | South: Southern Queensland

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Posted July 6, 2004; checked and revised July 12, 2017. Lighthouses: 34. Site copyright 2017 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.