Lighthouses of Italy: Eastern Sicily

The largest island in the Mediterranean, Sicily is separated from the tip of the Italian peninsula by the narrow Strait of Messina. Known as Sicilia in Italian, the island has an ancient history and has had many rulers. By the early nineteenth century, the Kingdom of Sicily and the mainland Kingdom of Naples had been united under a Bourbon monarchy as the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. During Italy's unification, the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies was conquered by Sardinia in 1860-61 and incorporated in the new Kingdom of Italy in 1861. Today the island is an autonomous region of the Italian Republic.

Sicily is divided into nine provinces, eight of which include portions of the coastline. This page includes the lighthouses of the four eastern provinces of Messina, Catania, Siracusa, and Ragusa. Lighthouses of Agrigento, Trapani, and Palermo are on the Western Sicily page.

The Italian word for a lighthouse is faro, plural fari. This name is usually reserved for the larger coastal lights; smaller beacons are called fanali. Aids to navigation are operated and maintained by the Italian Navy's Servizio dei Fari. Lighthouse properties are naval reservations, generally fenced and closed to the public.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. EF numbers are from the Italian Navy's light list, Elenco dei Fari e Segnali da Nebbia. Admiralty numbers are from volume E of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA List numbers are from Publication 113.

General Sources
Fari e Segnalamenti
Lighthouse information from the Italian Navy's Servizio dei Fari.
Cyberlights Lighthouses - Italy
Additional photos of Italian lighthouses by Egidio Ferrighi, posted by Gary Richardson and Anna Klein.
Online List of Lights - Italy
Photos by various photographers posted by Alexander Trabas.
Wikimedia: Lighthouses in Italy
Photos available in Wikimedia Commons.
World of Lighthouses - Italy
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Lighthouses in Italy
Aerial photos posted by Marinas.com.
Italienische Leuchttürme auf Historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.


Capo Peloro Light, Messina
photo copyright Egidio Ferrighi; used by permission

Messina Province Lighthouses

Aeolian Islands Lighthouses
Note: The Aeolian Islands (Isole Eolie) are a group of volcanic islands in the Tyrrhenian Sea north and northwest of Milazzo. Lipari and Salina, the largest islands, are at the center of the group. The islands include the famous volcanos of Stromboli, at the northeastern corner of the group, and Vulcano (which gave its name to all volcanos) at the southern corner. The islands are popular tourist destinations readily accessible by ferry from Milazzo and Messina.
Strombolicchio (Stromboli, Scoglio Strombolicchio)
1905. Active; focal plane 58 m (190 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. George Keith's photo is at right, a closeup photo is available, and Trabas has Capt. Theo Hinrichs's photo. Jimmy Karlsson's photo and Marinas.com's aerial photos show the remarkable situation of the lighthouse. Google's satellite view fails to reveal the tower. Strombolicchio is a rocky outcrop about 1.5 km (1 mi) northeast of the village of Stromboli, which clings to the northeastern corner of the island of the same name. The volcano of Stromboli is famous for being in continuous eruption since the time of the Romans, with no end in sight. In fact, the fire of the volcano is almost as reliable a navigational aid as any lighthouse. Located atop the islet, a location inaccessible to most lighthouse fans, but there are good views from the waterfront of Stromboli and from ferries arriving there. Accessible only by boat. There are steps leading to the lighthouse, but visits appear hazardous. Site open but dangerous, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-163; EF-3310; Admiralty E1802; NGA 9844.
* Capo Faro (Salina) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1884). Active; focal plane 56 m (184 ft); white light, 2 s on, 4 s off. 12 m (39 ft) cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, adjoining but not attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Entire lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. A large Fresnel lens is in use. A closeup photo and another photo are available, René Baldinger has a nice sunset view, and Google has a satellite view. Located on the coastal highway at Capo Faro, the northeastern corner of the island of Salina, about 3 km (2 mi) east of Malfa. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-020; EF-3296; Admiralty E1798; NGA 9848.
Faro di Strombolicchio
Strombolicchio Light, Stromboli, October 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo by George Keith
* Punta Lingua
1920s or 1930s . Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); white flash every 3 s. 12 m (39 ft) cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, adjoining but not attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Tower painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. The house is abandoned and unpainted. A 2008 photo, a closeup, and a view from the sea are available, Wikimedia has a distant view, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located at the end of a spit in the village of Lingua, at the southeastern corner of Salina. It should be possible to reach the lighthouse by a short walk. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-250; EF-3300; Admiralty E1796; NGA 9852.
* Marina Corta (Lipari)
Date unknown (station established 1915). Active; focal plane 11 m (36 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 8 m (26 ft) stone arch with a round lantern. Lantern painted white with a gray metallic roof. Trabas has a good photo by Klaus Potschien, but the tiny light is not conspicuous in Bing's satellite view of the harbor. An earlier Lipari lighthouse (established 1867) had a focal plane of 57 m (187 ft). Located at the Marina Corta on the south end of the waterfront in Lipari, the principal town of the island of Lipari. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-222; EF-3284; Admiralty E1792; NGA 9836.
Vulcano (Punta dei Porci, Faro di Gelso) (2)
1887 (station established 1853). Active; focal plane 35 m (115 ft); four white flashes every 20 s. 31 m (102 ft) octagonal stone tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 2-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. Massi Dex has a good photo, Trabas has a distant view by Klaus Potschien, a 2007 photo is available, and Bing has a satellite view. The photos show a deteriorating lighthouse in need of restoration. The lighthouse was apparently shortened by 10 m (33 ft) sometime after 1948, possibly as a result of damage during World War II. The island of Vulcano has a permanent population of less than 500. The last major eruption of its namesake volcano (for which all other volcanos are named) was in 1888-90. Located at the southern tip of the island. Accessible by 4WD vehicles or by walking 400 m (1/4 mi) from the end of the road at Gelso. Site status unknown, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-213; EF-3280; Admiralty E1786; NGA 9824.

Capo d'Orlando Lighthouse
* Capo d'Orlando
1904. Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); two long (2 s) flashes every 12 s. 11 m (36 ft) octagonal cylindrical masonry tower attached to the seaward side of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse unpainted; lantern dome is gray metallic. A 2011 photo is at right, Trabas has a good closeup by Klaus Potschien, another photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a fine satellite view and a street view from below the lighthouse. Located off the Via Andrea Doria on the point of the cape in the town of Capo d'Orlando. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-018; EF-3264; Admiralty E2038; NGA 9856.
Capo d'Orlando Light
Capo d'Orlando Light, Capo d'Orlando, June 2011
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Gomera-b

Milazzo Lighthouse
*
Capo Milazzo (2)
1891 (station established 1853). Active; focal plane 90 m (295 ft); white light, 2 s on, 4 s off. 10 m (34 ft) round concrete tower with four buttresses and a lantern. The lighthouse is unpainted. Trabas has Capt. Peter Mosselberger's photo, Antonio Iocullo has a good photo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Capo Milazzo is a long, finger-like peninsula projecting due north into the Tyrrhenian Sea. The harbor of Milazzo is sheltered on the east side of the base of the peninsula. The lighthouse is located at the end of the Via Sant'Antonio near the tip of the cape. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-026; EF-3268; Admiralty E2042; NGA 9796.

Messina Lighthouses

Note: Only 4 km (2.5 mi) wide at its northern end, the famous Strait of Messina separates the mainland region of Calabria from the island of Sicily. A natural whirlpool develops at the entrance to the strait, making this passage a dangerous one. In legend, this was the home of Scylla and Charybdis, sea monsters who dwelled on either side of the narrow passage, Scylla on the Calabrian side and Charybdis on the Sicilian, drowning sailors who passed too close to one or the other. There has been a long-running controversy in Italy about building a bridge across the strait, which is technically feasible but would be very expensive. In October 2006, parliament voted narrowly to shelve plans for the bridge, but in March 2009 the government announced that plans for the project were "fully revived."
* Capo Rasocolmo
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 85 m (279 ft); three white flashes every 10 s. 13 m (43 ft) 4-story concrete building with a lantern on the roof. The lighthouse is unpainted. Trabas has Capt. Peter's photo of this not-so-attractive lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. We need information on its history. Capo Rasocolmo is the northernmost point of the island of Sicily. Located on a promontory about 1.5 km (1 mi) west southwest of the actual cape and 3 km (2 mi) northeast of San Saba on the coastal road. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-032; EF-3276; Admiralty E2046; NGA 9792.
* Torre degli Inglesi (Torre di Capo Peloro)
Date unknown (1894?). Inactive since the 1930s (?). Approx. 21 m (70 ft) stone tower, part of a medieval fortress. A closeup photo and a view from the sea are available, as well as a second view from the sea, and Google has a street view and a fuzzy satellite view. Another view from the sea also shows the modern lighthouse behind the old tower. According to historic light lists collected by Michel Forand, a "temporary" light was shown "on the east angle" of the fort during the 1890s; the focal plane of this light was 16 m (52 ft). The historic postcard view of the original Capo Peloro lighthouse, posted by Huelse, shows a lantern atop the main tower of the fort; this view must date from around 1900. A 1920 list mentions a "turret on tower of old fort," established in 1916, with a focal plane of 26 m (85 ft), in good agreement with the postcard view. The light was probably discontinued when the restored Capo Peloro lighthouse went into service. Located at the extreme northeast point of the cape. Site status unknown but probably open, tower probably closed. ARLHS ITA-306.
* Capo Peloro (2)
1884 (station established 1853). Active; focal plane 37 m (121 ft); two green flashes every 10 s; also a red light, 2.5 s on, 2.5 s off, is shown at 22 m (72 ft) to warn ships away from a nearby shoal. 37 m (121 ft) octagonal masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lighthouse painted with black and white horizontal bands; lantern dome is gray metallic. Ferrighi's photo appears above, Trabas has a good photo by Capt. Theo Hinrichs, Wikimedia has a good photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This elegant lighthouse marks the extreme northeastern tip of Sicily and the west side of the entrance to the Strait of Messina from the Tyrrhenian Sea. The lighthouse originally had a height of 42 m (138 ft), as seen in the historic postcard view posted by Huelse. The building must have been heavily damaged in the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami of 28 December 1908, which destroyed 90% of the buildings in Messina and killed more than 100,000 people. Light lists indicate that the tower was out of service until sometime in the 1920s or 1930s, and when it was restored the tower had been shortened to its present height. Located on the Via Lanterna in Torre Faro. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-031; EF-2736; Admiralty E1806; NGA 9784.
* Messina Port Office
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); two green flashes every 5 s. 12 m (39 ft) square skeletal tower, painted green, mounted on the roof of a 1-story building. Trabas has a photo by Capt. Peter, and Google has a satellite view; the tip of the tower can be seen in Google's street view. Located on the Messina waterfront at the foot of the Viale Boccetta. Site open, tower closed. EF-2770; Admiralty E1818; NGA 9780.
* Punta Secca
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); yellow light, 2 s on, 1 s off. 12 m (39 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower with lantern and gallery. Tower painted yellow-brown; lantern painted white. Trabas has an excellent photo by Capt. Peter, Marcello Mento's view from the sea shows this light and the Punta San Raineri light, and Google has a satellite view. There is another Punta Secca ("Dry Point") lighthouse at Ragusa (see below). Located at the northeastern tip of Punta Secca; Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-278; EF-2758; Admiralty E1816; NGA 9772.
* Punta San Raineri (Torre Lanterna di Messina)
1555. Active; focal plane 41 m (135 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 42 m (138 ft) 2-stage octagonal cylindrical masonry light tower with lantern and gallery, mounted atop a large square stone defensive watch tower. The light tower is painted with black and white horizontal bands; the lantern is white with a gray metallic dome; the square watch tower is unpainted stone. A photo by Capt. Peter is at right, Trabas has another photo by Captain Peter, Wikimedia has Simon Praud's photo, Giulia Gasparro has another good photo, Klein and Richardson have a page for the lighthouse, Marinas.com has aerial photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The watch tower is part of a complex of fortifications ordered in 1546 by Charles V, the Spanish Holy Roman Emperor, to defend Sicily against the Ottoman Turks. Located off the Via Raineri on the east side (the outside) of the Punta Secca, a hook-like peninsula that protects the traditional harbor of Messina. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-143; EF-2752; Admiralty E1814; NGA 9768.
San Raineri Light
San Raineri Light, Messina
photo copyright Capt. Peter Mosselberger
used by permission

Catania Province Lighthouses

* Riposto (Punta Chiancona) (2)
Date unknown (station established 1903). Inactive since 1989. Approx. 8 m (26 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower centered on a 1-story masonry keeper's house. Lantern removed. A photo of the historic lighthouse is available (third photo on the page), and Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. Trabas has Capt. Peter's photo of the present light, a 6 m (20 ft) post with gallery (focal plane 15 m (49 ft); white light, 2 s on, 3 s off). Located near the base of the breakwater mole in Riposto, about 11 km (7 mi) north of Acireale. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-153; EF-2774; Admiralty E1822; NGA 10436.
* Capo Molini
1868. Active; focal plane 42 m (138 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 20 m (66 ft) lantern mounted atop a square masonry building. Lighthouse painted white; the lantern is gray metallic. Trabas has Capt. Peter's closeup photo, Marcello Barbagallo has a good photo, and Google has a satellite view. The tower, known as the Torre Sant'Anna, was built as part of a fortress in the late 1500s. The history of the light station is unclear; apparently the present lantern was installed in 1919. Located on the cape about 3 km (2 mi) south of Acireale and 10 km (6 mi) northeast of Catania. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-028; EF-2788; Admiralty E1826; NGA 10432.
Catania Molo di Levante (1)
Date unknown. Inactive. 6 m (20 ft) round concrete block tower with lantern and gallery. It appears that the lantern was originally painted white. The lighthouse has been replaced by a modern post light, painted green (focal plane 11 m (36 ft); green flash every 2 s). Trabas has Capt. Peter's photo of both lights with Mt. Etna in the background. Located at what was until fairly recently the end of the main breakwater of Catania; a Google satellite view shows a recent extension of the breakwater and a post light taller than the one in the Captain's photo. Site status unknown. EF-2802; Admiralty E1830; NGA 10420.
* Sciara Biscari (Catania) (2)
1951 (station established 1863). Active; focal plane 31 m (102 ft); white flash every 5 s. 28 m (92 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. Capt. Peter's photo is at right, a 2008 photo is available, Huelse has a postcard view that must date from very soon after the lighthouse was built, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. We lack information on the original lighthouse. Located at the south end of the Via Domenico Tempio on the Catania waterfront about 800 m (1/2 mi) south of the port area. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-158; EF-2796; Admiralty E1828; NGA 10400.
Faro di Sciara Biscari
Sciara Biscari Light, Catania
photo copyright Capt. Peter Mosselberger
used by permission

Siracusa Province Lighthouses

Augusta Area Lighthouses
* Brucoli (Castello Regina Giovanna)
1912. Active; focal plane 13 m (43 ft); white flash every 5 s. 13 m (43 ft) octagonal masonry tower with lantern and gallery mounted at one corner of a 15th century castle. Light tower painted white with one red horizontal band on the seaward side; lantern dome is gray metallic. Trabas has Captain Peter's closeup, another photo and a view from the sea are available, and Google has a satellite view. The castle was built in the 1460s and named for Juana (Giovanna) Enriquez, the second wife of King Juan II of Aragon and Sicily and the mother of the King Ferdinand who financed Columbus. Located on the waterfront of Brucoli, a small but ancient port about 6 km (3.5 mi) northwest of Augusta on the south shore of the Golfo di Catania. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-070; EF-2815; Admiralty E1836; NGA 10396.
* Capo Santa Croce
Date unknown (station established 1859). Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); two long (2 s) white flashes every 12 s. 27 m (89 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery, rising from one side of a square 1-story stone keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. Trabas has a good photo by Captain Peter, Wikimedia has Paolo Costa Baldi's photo, Giuseppe Pappa has a night time photo, another photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the extreme tip of the cape, marking the northern end of the Golfo di Augusta. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-035; EF-2820; Admiralty E1838; NGA 10392.
Torre Avalos (Forte d'Avalos) (4)
1858 (station established about 1570). Inactive since 1934. Approx. 17 m (56 ft) round stone tower with gallery, mounted on the wall of a ruined fortress. Lantern removed. The tower is painted in a black and white checkerboard pattern. The Navy's photo is at right, another photo and a view from the harbor are available, and Google has a good satellite view. The ancient port city of Augusta is built on an island at the northern end of the Golfo di Augusta. Around 1570, the Spanish viceroy Francisco Fernandez Avalos de Aquino built a fortress and lighthouse on a small sandy island off the south end of the city. Destroyed by attacking French troops in 1678, this first lighthouse was replaced two years later by the viceroy Francisco Benavides. The second tower was in service only 13 years before being toppled by the great earthquake of 1693. The third lighthouse, built in 1736, was patched up after most of the fortress was destroyed by a huge explosion of the powder magazine in 1823. Another earthquake knocked it out of service in 1848. Huelse has an antique postcard view of the fourth and final lighthouse, built in 1858. The Torre Avalos now stands inside a huge breakwater that encloses a large part of the northern end of the Golfo di Augusta; the construction of this breakwater made the lighthouse unnecessary. There is a wooden walkway from the breakwater to the old fort, but it does not appear to be open to the public. Located about 800 m (1/2 mi) south of the southern tip of Augusta. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed. ARLHS ITA-305.
* Punta Gennalena (Augusta Anteriore)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 8 m (29 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower rising from the seaward side of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. No lantern; the light is displayed through a round window near the top of the tower. The front face of the tower is painted black with a white vertical stripe. Google has a satellite view. Located on the west shore of the Golfo di Augusta about 10 km (6 mi) southwest of the port of Augusta. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-249; EF-2826; Admiralty E1846; NGA 10328.
Forte d'Avalos
Forte d'Avalos Light, Augusta
Italian Navy photo (no longer online)
* Dromo Giggia (Augusta Posteriore) (3)
Date unknown (station established 1895). Active; focal plane 79 m (259 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. 8 m (29 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower rising from the seaward side of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. No lantern; the light is displayed through a round window near the top of the tower. The front face of the tower is painted black with a white vertical stripe. Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's photo, and Google has a fine satellite view. Located on a hillside about 3 km (2 mi) west of the Punta Gennalena (front) light and 800 m (1/2 mi) west of the old coastal highway. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-062; EF-2832; Admiralty E1846.1; NGA 10332.
* Penisola Magnisi (Punta Magnisi)
Date unknown (station established 1859). Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); four white flashes every 12 s. 6 m (20 ft) concrete post light centered on the roof a small 1-story concrete equipment shelter. The post is white; the equipment shelter is painted with black and white horizontal bands. Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's photo, a black-and-white photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. The Penisola Magnisi is really an island in the Golfo di Augusta, connected tenuously to the mainland by a causeway built across a former sandbar. Located on the east point of the peninsula, about 5 km (3 mi) east of Priolo Gargallo. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-236; EF-2878; Admiralty E1860; NGA 10308.

Siracusa (Syracuse) Area Lighthouses
* Castello Maniace
Date unknown (station established 1858). Active; focal plane 27 m (89 ft); green flash every 3 s. 7 m (23 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on the walls of an ancient castle. Light tower painted green; lantern dome is gray metallic. A photo is at right, a 2011 photo and a 2008 photo are available, Trabas has Klaus Potschien's distant view, and Google has a satellite view. The castle was built in the 1230s by the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II and named for Georgios Maniakes (Giorgio Maniace in Italian), the Greek Byzantine general who briefly recovered Siracusa from Arab rule in 1038. The castle is a popular tourist attraction. Located at the end of a sharp promontory at the north side of the entrance to the harbor of Siracusa. Site and castle open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-193; EF-2886; Admiralty E1866; NGA 10248.

Castello Maniace Light, Siracusa, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by babalot
* Caderini (Porto Grande Anteriore)
1903. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); red light, 1 s on, 1 s off. 8.5 m (28 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower rising from the seaward side of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. No lantern; the light is displayed through a square window near the top of the tower. The front face of the tower is painted in a red and white checkerboard pattern. Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's photo, and Google satellite view shows the station. Located off the Traversa Caderini, on the west shore of the Porto Grande, south of the city of Siracusa. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-003; EF-2894; Admiralty E1868; NGA 10252.
* Carrozziere (Porto Grande Posteriore)
1903. Active; focal plane 25 m (82 ft); white light occulting once every 5 s. 15 m (49 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower rising from the seaward side of a 1-story masonry keeper's house. No lantern; the light is displayed through a square window near the top of the tower. The front face of the tower is painted in a red and white checkerboard pattern. Trabas has Egidio Ferrighi's photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the Via Lido Sacramento at the Via Elorina about 1 km (0.6 mi) west of the Caderini (front) light. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-049; EF-2894.1; Admiralty E1868.1; NGA 10256.
* Punta Castelluccio
1864. Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); red flash every 3 s. Approx. 15 m (49 ft) octagonal cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery, centered on the flat roof of a 2-story masonry keeper's house. The light tower is painted red, the house white; the lantern dome is gray metallic. Trabas has Ferrighi's photo (also seen at right), a view from the land and a view from the sea are available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a satellite view. Located on a point of land marking the south side of the entrance to the Porto Grande, the elliptical harbor of Siracusa. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-244; EF-2888; Admiralty E1867; NGA 10244.
Faro di Punta Castellucio
Punta Castelluccio Light, Siracusa
photo copyright Egidio Ferrighi; used by permission
* Capo Murro di Porco
Date unknown (station established 1859). Active; focal plane 34 m (112 ft); white flash every 5 s. 20 m (66 ft) octagonal concrete (?) tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 1-story keeper's house. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. Alfonso Vilches's May 2007 photo shows the lighthouse much in need of paint, Trabas also has a good photo by Klaus Potschien, Wikimedia has a good photo by Alessandro Cataldo, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This is the landfall light for Siracusa. The cape is a rather sharp promontory that projects southeastward from the city and helps shelter the harbor. Located on the point of Capo Murro di Porco, in the town of the same name, about 12 km (7.5 mi) southeast of the Siracusa waterfront. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-029; EF-2910; Admiralty E1876; NGA 10240.

Capo Passero Area Lighthouses
Note: Capo Passero is the southeastern tip of Sicily. The shoals and reefs associated with the cape are among the best known hazards of the Mediterranean.
* Capo Passero
1871. Active; focal plane 39 m (128 ft); two white flashes every 10 s. 19 m (62 ft) round masonry tower with lantern and gallery, mounted on the northeast corner of a large square fort. Lighthouse painted white; the lantern dome is gray metallic. Roberto Alvares's closeup photo is at right, Trabas has a panoramic view by Klaus Potschien, another distant view is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. The fort was built by the emperor Charles VI, who also held the title of King of Sicily, in the early 18th century. Located on the Isola Capo Passero, an island just off the point of the cape and the town of Portopalo di Capo Passero. The island is a protected nature reserve; boat transportation from the town is available. Site open, fort open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-060; EF-2922; Admiralty E1884; NGA 10228.
* Cozzo Spadaro
1864. Active; focal plane 82 m (269 ft); three quick white flashes every 15 s. 37 m (121 ft) octagonal masonry tower with lantern and gallery, rising from an octagonal base atop a square 1-story masonry keeper's house. 1st order Fresnel lens is in use. The lighthouse is unpainted white stone. Trabas has Klaus Potschien's photo, Giambattista Scivoletto has another good photo, Wikimedia has a photo, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This important and historic lighthouse is the landfall light for Capo Passero, the southeastern corner of Sicily. Located on a hill beside the Via Pachino, on the northwest (landward) side of the town of Portopalo di Capo Passero. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-057; EF-2918; Admiralty E1882; NGA 10224.
Faro di Capo Passero
Capo Passero Light, Portopalo di Capo Passero, August 2006
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Roberto Alvares (no longer online)
* Isola delle Correnti (1)
1865. Inactive since the late 2000s. 11 m (36 ft) round tower with gallery, attached to a large 1-story building that was originally a fortification but was later used as quarters for the keepers. The tower is unpainted white stone. Matteo Barbieri has a 2006 closeup photo, Trabas has a distant photo by Egidio Ferrighi, Marinas.com has good aerial photos, and Bing has a satellite view. Sometime after Barbieri's photo was taken, the active light (focal plane 16 m (52 ft); white flash every 4 s) was moved to an round fiberglass tower standing in front of the historic lighthouse. The Isola della Correnti is a small island just off the southeastern tip of Sicily, about 8 km (5 mi) southwest of Portopalo di Capo Passero. The island is joined to the mainland rather tenuously by a sand bar that can be crossed (in good weather) on foot or by 4WD vehicles, except near the time of high tide. The island is popular for sunbathing and surfing but dangerous for swimming (the name means Island of the Currents). Located at the highest point of the island. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-059; EF-2926; Admiralty E1886; NGA 10212.

Ragusa Province Lighthouses

#Scogli Porri (Sullo Scoglio Maggiore) (1)
Date unknown. Inactive. Formerly a 1-story concrete equipment room with the light displayed from a short skeletal tower atop the building. That tower was removed and the active light (focal plane 10 m (33 ft); two white flashes every 6 s) was moved to a short mast nearby. A 2011 photo shows that the equipment building has been destroyed, and only the mast remains. Google has an indistinct satellite view. The Scogli Porri are a dangerous rocks off Santa Maria del Focallo, about 8 km (5 mi) southeast of Pozzallo. Located on the largest of the rocks. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-159; EF-2930; Admiralty E1888; NGA 10208
* Pozzallo (4)
Date unknown (station established 1883). Inactive since 2011. 10 m (33 ft) semicircular cylindrical concrete tower with gallery and a small lantern, rising from the front of the port captain's office. Lighthouse painted with red and white horizontal bands. A photo by Manfred Weiss, contributed by Jürgen Klinksiek, is at right, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The light here was originally shown from a customs house, possibly the same building to which the present lighthouse is attached. In 1905 a skeletal tower was installed; it was replaced by a lighthouse sometime during the 1920s or 1930s. In 2011 the light was moved to a new tower on the breakwater (next entry). Located on the waterfront at Pozzallo, on the Via della Sirene at the foot of the Via Aristodemo. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-241; ex-Admiralty E1890; ex-NGA 10196.
Pozzallo Porto Commerciale
2011. Active; focal plane 18 m (59 ft); four white flashes every 12 s. 15 m (49 ft) round tapered white concrete tower with double gallery. Google has a satellite view. Located at the elbow of the main breakwater of Pozzallo. Site status unknown, but the tower can be seen from the waterfront and from ferries sailing between Pozzallo and Malta. EF-2934; Admiralty E1890.05; NGA 10196.
* Marina di Ragusa (Sulla Spiaggia)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); red flash every 5 s. 12 m (39 ft) square cylindrical masonry tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern is gray metallic. Google has a satellite view. Located across the street from the base of the east breakwater of Marina di Ragusa, about 6 km (4 mi) east of Punta Secca. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-223; EF-2941; Admiralty E1894; NGA 10188.

Pozzallo Light, Pozzallo, March 2009
photo copyright Manfred Weiss; used by permission
* Scaramia (Capo Scalambri, Punta Secca)
Date unknown (station established 1859). Active; focal plane 37 m (121 ft); two long (1.5 s) white flashes every 8 s. 34.5 m (113 ft) round tower with lantern and gallery. Lighthouse painted white; lantern dome is gray metallic. Pippo Palazzolo has posted an excellent photo, Wikimedia has a good photo, a 2008 photo is available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located adjacent to the small harbor of Punta Secca, about 25 km (15 mi) southwest of Ragusa. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-042; EF-2942; Admiralty E1896; NGA 10184.
* Scoglitti
Date unknown (station established 1914). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); three white flashes every 10 s. 13 m (43 ft) octagonal cylindrical tower with lantern and double gallery, centered on the roof of a 1-story keeper's house. Tower painted white, house painted white with unpainted stone trim; the lantern dome is gray metallic. A photo is at right, a 2008 photo and a night time photo are available, Marinas.com has aerial photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. We need information on the history of this lighthouse, since the tower is modern in appearance and the house seems to be much older. Located on the Via Amalfi, the seaside street, on the south side of Scoglitti, about 12 km (7.5 mi) southwest of Vittoria. Site open, tower closed. ARLHS ITA-080; EF-2946; Admiralty E1898; NGA 10180.

Information available on lost lighthouses:


Scoglitti Light, Scoglitti, August 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Giovanni

Notable faux lighthouses:

Adjoining pages: East: Calabria and Basilicata | West: Western Sicily

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Posted July 18, 2006. Checked and revised February 17, 2014. Lighthouses: 37. Site copyright 2014 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.