Lighthouses of Australia: South Western Australia

Western Australia is by far the largest state in the Australian union, including roughly one third of the country and about the same fraction of the coastline. The coast sweeps in a great semicircle, facing south on the Southern Ocean, west and northwest on the Indian Ocean, and north on the Timor Sea. A large part of the coastline is wild and thinly populated, and there are some very large gaps between lighthouses.

Because of the large area of the state, two pages are required in the Directory. This page includes lighthouses of the southern half of the coast: everything south of the Gascoyne region. A second page covers North Western Australia.

The coastal Western Australia lighthouses are managed by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), but after automation a number of the light station properties were transferred to the control of the state Department of Parks and Wildlife.

ARLHS numbers are from the ARLHS World List of Lights. Admiralty numbers are from volume K of the Admiralty List of Lights & Fog Signals. U.S. NGA numbers are from Publication 111.

General Sources
Lighthouses of Western Australia
The section of the Lighthouses of Australia site devoted to Western Australia lights.
Lighthouses of Western Australia
Photos and information posted by Pauline O'Brien.
Seaside Lights - Western Australia
Photos and notes by Garry Searle.
Lighthouses and Lightvessels in Australia - Western Australia
Index to Wikipedia articles; many include photos.
Lighthouses from the Air - Part 4 and Part 5
Articles from the Lighthouses of Australia Bulletin of December 2001 and January 2002, including good aerial photos of Western Australian lighthouses.
Around Australia Chasing Lighthouses - Part 3
Article from the Lighthouses of Australia Bulletin of January 2001 by John Ibbotson, including photos of many of the more remote lighthouses.
Australian Lighthouses
This site, posted by Kevin Mulcahy, has a comprehensive list of Australian lighthouses and includes good photos of some of them.
World of Lighthouses - Western Australia
Photos by various photographers available from Lightphotos.net.
Leuchttürme Australiens und Ozeaniens auf historischen Postkarten
Historic postcard images posted by Klaus Huelse.


Cape Naturaliste Light, Dunsborough, December 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by G. Crouch

Great Southern Coast Lighthouses

Esperance Area Lighthouses
[Figure of Eight Island (2)]
1984 (station established 1965). Active; focal plane 113 m (371 ft); white flash every 5 s. 4 m (13 ft) white fiberglass tower. No photo available, but Google has a distant satellite view. The original light had a lantern room; it was removed when the light was converted from acetylene to solar power. This is the landfall light for Esperance, a small port that ships grain and iron ore. Figure of Eight Island is at the western end of the Recherche Archipelago, a scattering of more than 100 islands off the Great Southern Coast. Accessible only by boat. Site and tower closed (sensitive ecological area). Admiralty K1808; NGA 8828.

Albany Area Lighthouses
Breaksea Island (2)
1901 (station established 1858). Active; focal plane 119 m (390 ft); two white flashes every 6 s. 15.5 m (51 ft) round cylindrical stone tower with lantern and gallery attached to a 1-story stone keeper's house. Tower unpainted gray stone; lantern painted white. The station includes two more keeper's houses (1902 and 1908), in ruins until restored in 2010. A photo by Dragi Markovic is at right, John Spurling has a photo, Winsome Bonham has an aerial photo, Wikimedia has a distant view by Jerrye and Roy Klotz, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Bing has a satellite view. This is the landfall light for Albany. The first lighthouse was a cast iron tower rising through the center of an octagonal stone keeper's cottage. That tower is gone, but ruins of the cottage stand next to the present lighthouse. In October 2009, federal officials announced a grant of $1.3 million for restoration of the light station and its development for tourism. By the end of 2011, the lighthouse and its keeper's houses had been restored to their historic appearance, but it appeared that $350,000 to $500,000 more would be needed to refit the buildings for tourists. In 2014 the Dept. of Parks and Wildlife engaged Sky Hook Helicopters to begin guided helicopter tours to the island and light station. Breaksea Island, 12 km (7 mi) east of Albany, is a protected nature reserve. Located on the highest point of the island. Accessible only by boat or helicopter. Site and tower closed (nature reserve) except for guided tours available during the warmer months. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Dept. of Parks and Wildlife (Breaksea Island Reserve). ARLHS AUS-012; Admiralty K1800; NGA 8832.
* [King Point (1)]
1858. Inactive since 1911. Ruined 1-story stone keeper's house. The active light (focal plane 42 m (138 ft); white flash every 3 s) is on a 9 m (30 ft) white post about 75 m (250 ft) uphill. A 2012 photo of the ruins is available, also a second photo, and Google has a satellite view. The light was moved to a skeletal tower close to the house in 1911, and then to the present tower sometime in recent years. The Albany City Council appropriated $20,000 to stabilize the ruins in 2001. Located off Marine Drive on the north side of the narrow entrance to Princess Royal Harbour, the inner harbor of Albany, from King George Sound. Accessible by a short walk from a nearby road. Site open. Owner/site manager: City of Albany. ARLHS AUS-279; Admiralty K1802; NGA 8840.
* Cave Point
1976. Inactive since 1994. 12 m (40 ft) round cylindrical concrete tower with gallery, painted white, attached to a 1-story circular concrete service building. A 2009 closeup is available, Dirk Slawinski has a distant photo, Barbara Saunders-Jones also has a distant view, and Bing has a satellite view. The lantern was replaced in 1996 by a Cospas-Sarsat satellite-aided search and rescue ground receiver, one of two in Australia. The lighthouse is a sibling of Cape Tourville Light, Tasmania. Located on the point in Torndirrup National Park about 15 km (9 mi) south of Albany. The lighthouse should be accessible by a short hike from the natural bridge (one of the best known features of the park) at the end of The Gap Road; however, there is a notable shortage of closeup photos. Site open, tower closed. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Dept. of Parks and Wildlife (Torndirrup National Park). ARLHS AUS-055; ex-Admiralty K1799.
Breaksea Island Light
Breaksea Island Light, 2010
Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water,
Population and Communities photo by Dragi Markovic
Eclipse Island
1926. Active; focal plane 117 m (384 ft); three white flashes every 12 s. 14 m (46 ft) unpainted round cylindrical concrete block tower with gallery; lantern removed in 1976. The light is shown from a short mast centered on the top of the capped tower. The original 1st order Fresnel lens has been on display since 1989 in a special building (the Eclipse Building) at the Western Australian Museum in Albany. Bing has a satellite view. Eclipse Island is a barren island about 7 km (4 mi) south of Cave Point. Landing on the island is difficult, and a crane was used to lift supplies up a 15 m (50 ft) cliff. After a fatal crane accident in 1976, the lighthouse was automated and the lantern removed. Located on the highest point of the island. Accessible only by boat; visible from shore at the end of The Gap Road or Eclipse Island Road. Site and tower closed. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Dept. of Parks and Wildlife (Eclipse Island Reserve). ARLHS AUS-068; Admiralty K1798; NGA 8860.
* Point d'Entrecasteaux
1960. Active; focal plane 110 m (361 ft); four white flashes every 30 s. 3 m (10 ft) square white concrete tower. Google has a satellite view and a closeup photo by Geoff Galwey. The lantern of the lighthouse was removed in 1989 and replaced by a short post. Located on a prominent cape about 95 km (60 mi) southeast of Cape Leeuwin. Accessible by road. Site open, tower closed. Site manager: Dept. of Parks and Wildlife ((D'Entrecasteaux National Park). Admiralty K1795; NGA 8868.

West Coast Lighthouses

Southwest Capes Lighthouses
**** Cape Leeuwin
1896 (William Douglass). Active; focal plane 56 m (185 ft); white flash every 7.5 s. 39 m (128 ft) round limestone tower with lantern and gallery, on a square base attached to a 1-story storeroom; 2nd order Chance Brothers Fresnel lens in use. Formerly unpainted, the tower was painted white in 2003 or 2004; the lantern is also painted white. Three 1-story stone keeper's houses. Also preserved is a wooden water wheel that formerly supplied fresh water to the station. Amanda Slater's photo is at right, Patryk Priess has a good photo, another photo is available, Ian Sanderson has a fine distant view, Wikipedia has an article with several photos, Wikimedia has additional photos, Huelse has a historic postcard view, Google has a rainy street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This historic building is one of Australia's best known lighthouses. It stands at the southwestern corner of the nation, at the end of a narrow peninsula with spectacular views of the Indian Ocean to the north and the Southern Ocean to the south. There are plans for a museum in the keeper's houses. Located at the end of Leeuwin Road southwest of Augusta. Parking provided. Site open (entry fee); tower open to guided tours daily (reservations required). Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Dept. of Parks and Wildlife (Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park). ARLHS AUS-035; Admiralty K1794; NGA 8872.
* Foul Bay
1967. Active; focal plane 92 m (303 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 6 m (20 ft) square cylindrical concrete block tower with lantern. The tower is unpainted white concrete; lantern painted white. This light replaced the 1938 lighthouse on nearby Hamelin Island. Bruce Bundt has a photo, O'Brien has a small photo, Winsome Bonham has an aerial photo, and Google has a satellite view. Located on Cosy Corner Road, on a headland near Hamelin Bay, about 20 km (13 mi) northwest of Cape Leeuwin. John Ibbotson describes the road as a "rough, sandy track," so 4WD is required. Site status unknown. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: unknown. ARLHS AUS-211; Admiralty K1792; NGA 8876.
Hamelin Island
1938. Inactive since 1967. 9 m (30 ft) square cylindrical concrete tower. Lantern removed. O'Brien has a small photo, the lighthouse can be seen in a distant view from the mainland, Chris Ring has another view from the mainland, and Google has a satellite view. We don't know the function of the skeletal tower seen next to the lighthouse. In 1967 the light was moved about 4 km (2.5 mi) south southwest to Foul Bay (previous entry). Hamelin Island is an islet about 300 m (330 yd) in diameter and 800 m (1/2 mi) off the coast. Accessible only by boat, although there's a view from the end of Hamelin Bay Road. Site status unknown. Site manager: Dept. of Parks and Wildlife (Hamelin Island Reserve).

Cape Leeuwin Light, Augusta, March 2009
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Amanda Slater
**** Cape Naturaliste
1904 (C.S.R. Palmer). Active; focal plane 123 m (404 ft); two white flashes, separated by 2.5 s, every 10 s. 20 m (65 ft) round limestone tower with lantern and gallery, painted white; original 1st order Chance Brothers Fresnel lens. Three 1-story stone keeper's houses, one housing a custodian and another open as a museum. G. Crouch's photo appears at the top of this page, T. Seemann has a closeup photo, Lighthouses of Australia also has a good page on the lighthouse, Wikimedia has photos, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Items on display at the museum include the original 2nd order Chance Brothers Fresnel lens from Jarman Island Light (see below) and the original Great Sandy Island beacon, both from the Pilbara Coast far to the north. In April 2004 the 100th anniversary of the lighthouse was celebrated. Located at the end of the cape road north of Dunsborough, adjacent to Leeuwin-Naturaliste National Park. Parking provided. Site open; tower open to guided tours daily. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Cape Naturaliste Tourism Association. ARLHS AUS-040; Admiralty K1790; NGA 8880.

Bunbury and Halls Head Lighthouses
* Casuarina Point (Marlston Hill, Bunbury) (4)
1970 (station established 1870). Active; focal plane 43 m (142 ft); three white flashes, separated by 2.4 s, every 15 s. 25 m (82 ft) round cylindrical tower with lantern and gallery, painted in a black and white checkerboard pattern; base is black. The height was increased by 10 m (33 ft) in 1971 by adding a new section above the base. Sheila Thomson's photo is at right, a fine March 2007 photo shows the tower freshly painted, Wikimedia has a photo by Rob Jules, Winsome Bonham also has a photo, the port authority has historical information, Google has a street view, and Google has a satellite view. The first Bunbury lighthouse, a 3 m (10 ft) wood tower, was built on Marlston Hill about 365 m (400 yd) east northeast of the present site. It was replaced in 1901 by a temporary skeletal tower, and then in 1903 by a 9 m (30 ft) cast iron tower seen in Huelse's historic postcard view. In 1959, the cast iron tower was raised in height by 6 m (20 ft) by replacing the lantern with a cylindrical extension and a new lantern. The 1959 lantern and the added section were incorporated into the present light when it was built in 1970. The rest of the 1903 lighthouse was demolished, and there is now a modern lookout tower atop the hill. In 2004 a proposal to install a cell phone tower atop the lighthouse drew protests from residents and the city council, and the tower was not installed. Located on Marlston Drive at Bennett Way on the ocean side of Bunbury. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: Bunbury Port Authority. ARLHS AUS-054; Admiralty K1782; NGA 8888.
* Halls Head (Robert Point)
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 53 m (174 ft); white flash every 2 s. Round unpainted concrete water tower, height unknown. O'Brien has a small photo, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on a hilltop above Leighton Road and Janis Street in Halls Head. Site status unknown, but there are good views from nearby. Admiralty K1781.6; NGA 8926.

Casuarina Point Light
Casuarina Point Light, Bunbury, August 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Sheila Thomson


Cockburn Sound Lighthouses
Note: Cockburn Sound is sheltered behind Garden Island, the site of Australia's main naval base on the Indian Ocean.
Garden Island
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 49 m (161 ft); three white flashes every 12 s. 4 m (13 ft) post centered on a 1-story white concrete equipment shelter. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on heights on the west side of the island. Site and tower closed. Admiralty K1780.9; NGA 8939.
Success and Parmelia Banks Channel Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 21 m (69 ft); continuous red light; continuous green and white passing lights are shown from lower locations on the tower. 21 m (69 ft) round steel tower with gallery, painted white with one orange horizontal band. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. The range guides vessels into Cockburn Sound. Located about 4 km (2.5 mi) east of the northern tip of Garden Island and a similar distance west southwest of Woodman Point on the mainland. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1771.1; NGA 9012.
Success and Parmelia Banks Channel Range Front
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 12 m (39 ft); continuous red or green light, depending on direction. 12 m (39 ft) round steel tower with gallery, painted white with one orange horizontal band. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located off Woodman Point about 800 m (1/2 mi) north of the rear light. Accessible only by boat. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1771; NGA 9008.
Stirling Channel Range Front
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 29 m (96 ft); continuous blue light. 28 m (92 ft) round steel column. Trevor Kenyon has a photo of the two range lights, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. The range guides vessels approaching the industrial piers on the east side of Cockburn Sound. Located at the end of a pier off the end of Riseley Road in Kwinana. Site and tower closed, but the light can be seen from shore. Admiralty K1777; NGA 8976.
Stirling Channel Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 34 m (112 ft); continuous blue light. 32 m (105 ft) round steel column. Trevor Kenyon has a photo of the two range lights, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located on the same pier as the front light. Site and tower closed, but the light can be seen from shore. Admiralty K1777.05; NGA 8980.
* Woodman Point (Gage Roads)
1902 (C.Y. O'Connor). Active; focal plane 37 m (123 ft); green, red, or white light depending on direction, white indicating the safe channel, occulting for 3 s once every 30 s. 13 m (42 ft) round stone tower with lantern and gallery. Seaward side of the tower painted white, land side unpainted; lantern painted white. Two 1-story keeper's houses. Wikipedia's article has Andrew Gregory's photo also seen at right, a 2009 photo is available, and Google has a satellite view. A historic but rather poorly known lighthouse. It has one curious feature: the original contractor installed the red and green sectors incorrectly, and they remain incorrect today, with the green sector to the south of the channel and the red sector to the north instead of the other way around. Woodman Point is a sharp promontory projecting into Cockburn Sound about 8 km (5 mi) south of Fremantle. The lighthouse, however, is located atop a hill at the base of the point, on the east (landward) side of Cockburn Road (highway 12). Site and tower closed, but the lighthouse can be viewed from the base of the hill. Operator/site manager: Fremantle Ports. ARLHS AUS-174; Admiralty K1774; NGA 9004.

Woodman Point Light, Cockburn, April 2007
Wikimedia public domain photo by Andrew Gregory

Rottnest Island Lighthouses
Note: Rottnest Island is a limestone island, 11 km (6.8 mi) long and up to 4.5 km (2.8 mi) wide, located 18 km (11 mi) off the coast near Fremantle. Its name, coined by the Dutch explorer Willem de Vlamingh in 1696, means "rat's nest," but the "rats" are actually quokkas, small marsupials. The island has been a protected reserve since 1917. The island is managed for conservation and recreation by the Rottnest Island Authority; it is a popular resort for the Perth area, with various accommodations available. The island is accessible by passenger ferry from Perth, Fremantle, North Fremantle, or Hillarys; the authority charges an entry fee to support its activities.
**** Rottnest Island (Wadjemup Hill) (2)
1896 (station established 1851) (William Douglass). Active; focal plane 80 m (262 ft); white flash every 7.5 s. 38 m (125 ft) round limestone tower with lantern and gallery. Entire lighthouse painted white. The photo from Wikipedia's article is at right, Craig Sefton has a photo, another good photo is available, Searle has a historic photo, and Google has a satellite view and Pawel Zawadzki's street view. This is Western Australia's oldest light station; the first lighthouse was a 20 m (66 ft) stone tower (Australia's first stone lighthouse) built by Aboriginal convicts imprisoned on the island. The current lighthouse, a sibling of Cape Leeuwin Light, was the first Australian lighthouse to be equipped with a rotating lens. In 2005, cellphone transmitters attached to the lighthouse were removed, and on 5 November 2005 ceremonies were held opening the lighthouse to the public. Located at the highest point of the island, near the western end. The light station is accessible by bus tour, bicycle, or hiking. Site open, tower open for tours daily. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Rottnest Island Authority. ARLHS AUS-146; Admiralty K1760; NGA 9024.
*** Bathurst Point (Kingston Reefs Range Rear)
1900. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); four white flashes, separated by 3 s, every 16 s. 20 m (66 ft) round limestone tower with lantern and gallery, painted white. Two keeper's houses are available for overnight rental. Jason Nolan has an excellent closeup photo, Searle has a photo and several historic images, Wikipedia has an article with a closeup photo, Tony Batchelor has a view of the station, a view from the beach is available, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a satellite view. The lighthouse serves as the rear light of a range guiding ships departing Fremantle past the reefs east of Rottnest Island. Located on the northeast point of the island. Site open, guided tours of the boathouse and pilot quarters are available; tower closed. Operator: AMSA. Site manager: Rottnest Island Authority. ARLHS AUS-006; Admiralty K1761.1; NGA 9036.1.
Rottnest Island Light
Rottnest Island (Wadjemup) Light, March 2009
Wikimedia Creative Commons photo by Djanga

Fremantle Lighthouses
Note: Fremantle, located at the mouth of the Swan River, is the seaport of Perth, the capital of Western Australia.The town, 19 km (12 mi) southwest of the capital city, has a population of about 26,000.
* Fremantle South Mole
1903 (C.Y. O'Conner). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); green light occulting every 2 s. 9 m (30 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted green with white trim; lantern painted white. Keeper's house demolished. Michael Graffin's photo is at right, Jeremy Davis has another good photo, Wikimedia has a photo, Huelse has a historic postcard view, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Several other small buildings and structures around the lighthouse are the remains of World War II fortifications. Designed in Australia but prefabricated in England. The lighthouse was refurbished and repainted in a lighter green color for its 100th anniversary in 2003. Located at the end of the south breakwater at the entrance to the Swan River, Fremantle's harbor. The pier is open to autos as well as walkers, bicycles, and motorcycles. Site open, tower closed. Good view from Rottnest Island ferries. Operator/site manager: Fremantle Ports. ARLHS AUS-151; Admiralty K1765; NGA 9064.
* Fremantle North Mole
1906 (C.Y. O'Conner). Active; focal plane 15 m (49 ft); red light occulting every 2 s. 9 m (30 ft) round cast iron tower with lantern and gallery, painted red with white trim; lantern painted white. Keeper's house demolished. Wikipedia has an article with a good photo, Dennis Paul Griffiths has a 2012 photo, another photo are available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. A twin of the South Mole Light, designed in Australia but prefabricated in England. Located at the end of the north breakwater at the entrance to the Swan River, Fremantle's harbor. The pier is open to autos as well as walkers, bicycles, and motorcycles. Site open, tower closed. Good view from Rottnest Island ferries. Operator/site manager: Fremantle Ports. ARLHS AUS-120; Admiralty K1764; NGA 9076.
* [Fremantle Inner Harbor Entrance Range Front]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 23 m (75 ft); continuous blue light. Approx. 21 m (69 ft) steel mast carrying a rectangular orange daymark panel. Peter Connolly has a closeup photo, and Google has a satellite view and Olivier Wavre's street view. Located on the Fremantle waterfront across Peter Hughes Drive from the Fremantle Ports headquarters. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1767.6; NGA 9063.
* [Fremantle Inner Harbor Entrance Range Rear]
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); continuous blue light. Approx. 28 m (92 ft) steel mast carrying a rectangular orange daymark panel. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located 180 m (590 ft) east of the front light. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1767.61; NGA 9063.1.

Fremantle South Mole Light, December 2008
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Michael Graffin
* Buckland Hill
1970s. Active; focal plane 66 m (216 ft); directional light, showing green, white, or red depending on direction. 10 m (33 ft) square cylindrical tower topped by a square structure and a mast. O'Brien has a photo, a 2009 photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. This unusual light tower guides ships on their final approach to the Fremantle harbor entrance. It stands atop a covered water reservoir in the Buckland Hill Reserve. Located on a hill in Mosman Park north of the Fremantle harbor. Site status unknown. Operator/site manager: Fremantle Ports. ARLHS AUS-014; Admiralty K1762.8; NGA 9044.
** Hillarys Boat Harbour
1986. Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); two white flashes every 6 s. 20 m (65 ft) square pyramidal steel skeletal tower with lantern and enclosed upper portion, painted white. A circular observation platform surrounds the tower about 5 m (16 ft) off the ground. A photo and a second photo are available, Søren Terp has a 2014 view of the lighthouse in action, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. The lantern for this lighthouse was transferred from the Bedout Island Light, which had been replaced. Located at the end of the north breakwater at Hillarys Boat Harbor in Wanneroo, about 20 km (13 mi) north of Fremantle. Site and observation platform open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: Fremantle Ports. ARLHS AUS-277; Admiralty K1758.3; NGA 9102.7.
* Ocean Reef Boat Harbour Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 24 m (79 ft); continuous blue light. 23 m (75 ft) round column carrying rectangular daymarks. Lighthouse colored white with a red band facing the sea. A photo is available, and Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located at the Ocean Reef harbor, about 7 km (4.5 mi) north of Hillarys harbor. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1757.8; NGA 9103.

Batavia Coast Lighthouses
* Guilderton (Moore River)
1983. Active; focal plane 74 m (243 ft); three white flashes every 20 s. 30 m (98 ft) tapered round brick tower with lantern and brick gallery. Tower is unpainted red brick, lantern painted white. Alex Graham's photo is at right, Paul Robinson has a 2007 closeup photo, Chris Williams also has a photo, and Google has a satellite view and a distant street view. This lighthouse is a twin of the 1980 Troubridge Hill Light in South Australia. Designed for automated operation, the tower has no windows. Guilderton, a relatively new town at the mouth of the Moore River, is a popular vacation resort. Located off Forrester Road on the north side of Guilderton, 94 km (58 mi) north of Perth. Site open, tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-088; Admiralty K1757.5; NGA 9112.
Escape Island (Jurien Bay) (2)
1980 (station established 1930). Active; focal plane 30 m (98 ft); three white flashes every 15 s. 24 m (79 ft) square steel skeletal tower with gallery. Winsome Bonham has a photo, John Ibbotson has a photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located at the center of a low island about 5 km (3 mi) southwest of Jurien Bay. Accessible only by boat. Site status unknown. Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-072; Admiralty K1756; NGA 9140.
* Green Head Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 28 m (92 ft); white light, 2 s on, 2 s off. Approx. 15 m (49 ft) round cylindrical white steel tower carrying a large rectangular daymark. No closeup photo available. The tower is seen in the distance near the center of an aerial view of the town, and Bing has a satellite view. The front light is on a similar, shorter tower. Located atop a headland at Green Head. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1755.1; NGA 9150.1.

Guilderton Light, Guilderton, September 2010
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Alex Graham
[Freshwater Point]
1981. Active; focal plane 36 m (118 ft); white flash every 5 s. Approx. 10 m (33 ft) steel post with gallery, painted white. O'Brien has a small photo, Surf Life Saving has an aerial photo of the point (click on the photo for enlargement), and Bing has a satellite view. Located on a headland about 40 km (25 mi) south of Port Denison. Site status unknown. Admiralty K1754.9; NGA 9157.
* Port Denison Obelisk (Harbour Range Front)
1869. Active; focal plane 10 m (33 ft); continuous blue neon light. Approx. 12 m (40 ft) square pyramidal stone obelisk on a square 1-story base; the light is mounted on the north face of the tower. Obelisk painted white, base red. Eric Titcombe's photo is at right, another photo is available, Google has a street view, and Bing has a satellite view. This is one of the best preserved of the many stone obelisks built in Australia during the mid 1800s as unlighted navigational aids. Originally it was one of two obelisks that formed a range, and in recent years it has resumed that function as a minor range for vessels after they enter the harbor. It serves primarily as an observation point and as a memorial to fishermen from Port Denison lost at sea. Located on Port Leander Drive and Harbour View, at the southwestern corner of the harbor of Port Denison and about 4 km (2.5 mi) south of Dongara. Site open; parking provided. Site manager: unknown. Admiralty K1754.5; NGA 9156.2.
* Port Denison Range Front
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 19 m (62 ft); white light occulting once every 3.5 s. Approx. 13 m (43 ft) round cylindrical white steel tower carrying a large red rectangular daymark. Google has a street view and a distant satellite view. Located at the end of Ridley Street in Port Denison. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1754; NGA 9152.
* Port Denison Range Rear
Date unknown. Active; focal plane 40 m (131 ft); white flash every 2 s. Approx. 20 m (66 ft) round cylindrical white steel tower carrying a large red rectangular daymark. Google has a street view and a satellite view. Located off Blenheim Road near the Dongara Public Hospital. Site open, tower closed. Admiralty K1754.1; NGA 9156.
Port Denison Obelisk
Port Denison Obelisk, September 2005
Flickr Creative Commons photo by Eric Titcombe
Pelsaert Island
1974. Active; focal plane 21 m (70 ft); white flash every 5 s. 20 m (66 ft) round cylindrical stainless steel tower with gallery but no lantern. Winsome Bonham has an aerial photo, and Bing has a satellite view. Located near the southern tip of Pelsaert Island, which is at the south end of the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, a string of 122 small islands and reefs in the Indian Ocean about 60 km (40 mi) west of Geraldton. Accessible only by boat. Site open but very difficult to reach, tower closed. Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-126; Admiralty K1753.6; NGA 9160.
* Point Moore (Geraldton)
1876. Active; focal plane 34 m (112 ft); two white flashes, separated by 2.5 s, every 10 s. 35 m (115 ft) round steel tower with lantern and gallery, painted with red an white horizontal bands; the original 2nd order Chance Brothers Fresnel lens remains in use. The tower was prefabricated in England by Chance Brothers. 1-story keeper's house. Lorraine Phelan's photo is at right, Don Pugh has a photo, a closeup is available, and Google has a closeup street view and a good satellite view. The lighthouse was relocated about 5 km (3 mi) in 1878 after the original site was found to be unsuitable. The lighthouse was repainted and refurbished in 2007. Located at the end of a narrow peninsula jutting into the Indian Ocean on the south side of Geraldton. Site and tower closed (fenced) but the lighthouse can be viewed from the street. Operator/site manager: Midwest Ports Authority (?). ARLHS AUS-111; Admiralty K1740; NGA 9164.
** Bluff Point Range Rear
1876. Inactive since 1952. 7.5 m (25 ft) square cylindrical limestone tower rising at one corner of a 1-story limestone keeper's cottage. The lantern was removed and replaced with a pyramidal roof. Building painted white. Google has a good street view and a satellite view. The range was abandoned after the front lighthouse was destroyed by fire in April 1952. Since 1971 the keeper's house has served as the headquarters of the Geraldton Historical Society, which maintains a small museum in the building. The building was restored in 1985-86. Located on Chapman Road south of Elphick Avenue in Bluff Point, on the north side of Geraldton. Site open, museum open Monday through Friday. Owner: City of Greater Geraldton. Site manager: Geraldton Historical Society. ARLHS AUS-009.
Shoal Point
1958. Active; focal plane 118 m (386 ft); white flash every 5 s. 6 m (20 ft) square brick tower with lantern, painted white. No photo available, but Google has a satellite view. Located on heights about 4.5 km (2.75 mi) from the coast, about 30 km (19 mi) south of Kalbarri. Site status unknown. Operator/site manager: AMSA. ARLHS AUS-216; Admiralty K1739; NGA 9204.
Point Moore Light
Point Moore Light, Geraldton, September 2007
Flickr Creative Commons photo
by Lorraine Phelan

Information available on lost lighthouses:

  • Arthur Head (1851-1905), Fremantle. Huelse has a postcard view of the second (1879) lighthouse. The lighthouse was demolished, and there is no longer a light at this location. ARLHS AUS-004.
  • Busselton Jetty (1870-?). The original lighthouse was a square tower on piles with a focal plane of 63 ft (19 m). No photo of this lighthouse has been found. In 1870 the Busselton Jetty was only 175 m (575 ft) long; eventually it was extended to a length of 1841 m (1.14 mi). There is a light on a post at the end of the modern jetty. Admiralty K1788; NGA 8884.
  • Marlston Hill (1870-1970), Bunbury. This lighthouse was replaced by the Casuarina Point lighthouse; see above. ARLHS AUS-107 (listed as "Marsden Hill").

Notable faux lighthouses:

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Adjoining pages: North: North Western Australia | East: South Australia

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Posted June 15, 2004; checked and revised June 30, 2015. Lighthouses: 33. Site copyright 2015 Russ Rowlett and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.