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Hanes Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Aily Nash

Black-and-white photographic portrait of a young white woman with dark hair in a chin-length bob and wearing a buttoned up dark collared shirt.

PLEASE NOTE: This lecture will take place at Morehead Planetarium with a screening in collaboration with the Cosmic Rays Film Festival)

Aily Nash is a curator based in New York. She is co-curator of Projections, the New York Film Festival’s artists’ film and video section, and program advisor to the International Film Festival Rotterdam’s Short Film section. She recently served as a Biennial advisor and co-curator of the film program for the 2017 Whitney Biennial, and was Head of Programming for the 2018 edition of the Images Festival in Toronto. She has curated programs and exhibitions for MoMA PS1 (New York), Brooklyn Academy of Music (New York), Anthology Film Archives (New York), Kiasma (Helsinki), Tabakalera (San Sebastian), FACT (Liverpool), Image Forum (Tokyo) and others. She curated five seasons of the Basilica Screenings series at Basilica Hudson (2012-2016). Her writing has appeared in the Brooklyn Rail, BOMB, Artforum.com, Film Comment, and elsewhere. In 2015, she was awarded a Curatorial Fellowship from the Andy Warhol Foundation. She recently commissioned new works by James N. Kienitz Wilkins and Lucy Raven through the Finnish Cultural Institute New York’s MOBIUS Curatorial Fellowship in partnership with PUBLICS and Heureka, Finnish science center.

An endowment established in 1983 through the generosity of Nancy and Robin Hanes supports the Art Department’s Visiting Artist Series. This important program brings both established and emerging artists to campus to discuss their work in public lectures and to offer individual critiques to our M.F.A. students.  The Hanes Visiting Artist series greatly enriches both our academic programs and our outreach to the wider community.  All lectures are free and open to the public.

2018-2019 HANES VISITING ARTIST LECTURE SERIES:
Political Geographies

Political Geography  examines political, cultural and social landscapes. Artists in this lecture series present diverse interpretations of geographic spaces, including psychogeography, and work through modes of mapping and representation, performance and social practice. These artists examine the spatial distribution and control of political processes and how geographic location and identity impact these processes and spaces. These artists are influenced by the study of laws and the effects on bodies in specific geographical environments, especially in relation to the behavior of other individuals and political bodies. Collectively, their work challenges ideas of space, place, ideology, energy, systems of power, agriculture, and dys/utopias.

Contact: Sabine Gruffat, gruffat@email.unc.edu

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