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UNC-Chapel Hill students receive Boren Awards

Valued at up to $30,000, Boren Fellowships are awarded to graduate students to live and study in areas of the world important to national security.

Two University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students have been recognized by the National Security Education Program with Boren Awards, which support fields of study identified as critical to United States national security, particularly language study.

Kirsten Cooper, a graduate student from Westerly, Rhode Island, in the College of Arts and Sciences studying history, received one of 114 Boren Fellowships granted nationwide by the NSEP to graduate students. She will use the fellowship to study in South Korea. Richard Ong, a rising junior at Carolina from Winston-Salem majoring in history and peace, war and defense, received one of 194 Boren Scholarships granted nationwide to undergraduates. Ong will use the scholarship to study Hindi in India through the South Asian Flagship Language Initiative.

Valued at up to $30,000, Boren Fellowships are awarded to graduate students to live and study in areas of the world important to national security.

Boren Scholarships award up to $20,000 a year for students to study less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests.

The Boren Awards underline the commitment of both the federal government and the Institute of International Education to educate our country’s citizens. It is among the few awards available to fund the deep pursuit of language study for graduate students. Both the Boren Fellowship and Scholarship are awarded in exchange for commitment to work in the federal government for a period of time.

“Without the Boren Awards, the National Security Education Program and the substantial funding and programs they provide, these outstanding Carolina students and others might find it difficult to gain advanced knowledge in critical languages not commonly studied,” said professor Inger S. Brodey, director of UNC’s Office of Distinguished Scholarships. “We’re incredibly proud that Kirsten and Richard will have this exciting opportunity.”