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The University is currently operating under Reduced Campus Services and Operations due to COVID-19

Research

A seafood market

Seafood mislabeling in North Carolina

Two recent student-led papers based on research in the undergraduate “Seafood Forensics” class at UNC-Chapel Hill show that seafood mislabeling in North Carolina is a big problem.

The Latest

  • A seafood market

    Seafood mislabeling in North Carolina

    Two recent student-led papers based on research in the undergraduate “Seafood Forensics” class at UNC-Chapel Hill show that seafood mislabeling in North Carolina is a big problem.

  • A satellite view of a hurricane forming in the Atlantic Ocean.

    An active storm season

    June 1 marked the start of the 2020 hurricane season — and it’s slated to be an active one. Carolina researcher Rick Luettich talks about this year’s above-average hurricane forecast, the impact these storms have on inland populations and how COVID-19 may affect vulnerable communities.

  • The Old Well in the summer.

    Second project announced through Carolina-Deerfield partnership

    New research from UNC-Chapel Hill and Deerfield Management Company could potentially lead to relief for tens of thousands of Americans suffering from an untreatable disease.

  • A lit cigarette.

    Giving a global voice to minority smoking inequities

    A UNC-Chapel Hill student-led public health team placed third among 3,500 participants in Oxford University’s global systems mapping competition, exploring racial and ethnic disparities in tobacco control.

  • Cassandra Davis

    Calculating COVID-19’s educational costs

    Cassandra R. Davis studies the impact of natural disasters on schools and communities, particularly at the K-12 level. Now the public policy professor is turning her attention to the impact of another kind of disaster — a pandemic — on first-generation college students.

  • Kia Caldwell

    Inequality amplifies African Americans’ COVID-19 risk

    Recent data shows that minorities are more at risk for contracting COVID-19 and experiencing poor health outcomes. In particular, African Americans in COVID-19 hot spots are twice as likely to die from the virus than their white counterparts. Kia Caldwell examines why.