Visit Carolina

Experience an innovative institution of higher learning, a global research university committed to accessibility and impact, a place with a legacy as old as the United States – and a boundless future. The UNC Visitors Center can’t wait to share all that is special about Carolina. Whether you're a student, staff member or visitor, we can recommend a guided tour, self-directed stroll or many other ways to help you to discover Carolina.

A man and woman walk up the stairs outside the west side of Morehead Planetarium, site of the UNC Visitors' Center.

Welcome to Carolina!

The Visitors Center welcomes you to our dynamic campus. Whether you’re interested in prospective undergraduate tours – provided by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions – or you’d just like to get to know Carolina better, we invite you to walk our storied brick paths and between our stone walls.

Look at the tour opportunities below to find one that fits your interests and for additional resources on visiting Carolina. Call or stop by the Visitors Center for a brochure, recommendations and insight.

Contact the Visitors Center

250 E. Franklin Street
Chapel Hill, N.C.
(919) 962-1630
uncvisitorscenter@unc.edu
Hours: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday

Campus Events

See all Events
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    Wilson Library200 South RdChapel Hill27599 | Free

    This exhibition explores the genre of historical scholarship from the late-fifteenth century through the mid-seventeenth century, a transformative time in Europe’s conception of the global past. It draws on the Rare Book Collection and the North Carolina Collection, both at the Wilson Special Collections Library.

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    Wilson Library200 South RdChapel Hill27599 | Free

    This University Libraries exhibition takes a lighthearted look at Sir Walter Raleigh and his influence on history and popular culture.

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    Hanes Art Center115 S. Columbia St.Chapel HillNC27514 |

    A Metaphor Against Oblivion is inspired by two themes; landscape and absence. It comments on and metaphorically represents the absent landscape that remains in the collective consciousness.