Spotlight

Antidote can deactivate new form of heparin

Low-molecular-weight heparin is commonly used in surgeries to prevent dangerous blood clots. But when patients experience the other extreme – uncontrolled bleeding – in response to low-molecular-weight heparin, there is no antidote. Now researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a synthetic form of low-molecular-weight heparin…

Rush to victory: A UNC-Duke time-lapse

Miss out on North Carolina’s 74-66 victory over top-10 Duke on Feb. 20? Here’s one way to relive it – in about two minutes. Using seven cameras and 19 camera angles (yes, that Smith Center catwalk is waaaaaay up there), five UNC communications staffers captured everything from the concession stand to the basketball museum to…

Algorithms, robotics: healing potential

Robotic tentacles are on Ron Alterovitz’s mind. The UNC computer scientist and his research group have been investigating new algorithms to enable a robotic device to go deep inside the human body to precisely treat abnormal growths, tumors and other ailments. The snake-like set of concentric tubes is the focus of Alterovitz’s quest to send…

Life in the fast lane

From its raw beginnings on Southern dirt tracks after World War II, NASCAR transformed itself into a sports colossus, attended by crowds in the hundreds of thousands, watched on television by the second-largest viewing audience in sports and bankrolled by the largesse of the Fortune 500’s elite. But as it rounds the first curve of…

Lives discovered

Details from the lives of black artisans in North Carolina, unseen for more than 100 years, are being discovered by UNC students using digital resources recently made available through Ancestry.com subsidiary Newspapers.com and the University library. The students are in an American Studies first-year seminar, The Family and Social Change in America. On a recent…

Art as weapon in war-torn Congo

When her mother learned that Chérie Rivers Ndaliko was thinking of graduate school, she did what she always had: she created a spreadsheet of the best schools. “I mean, when I was a kid, she went through the entire phone book to choose my elementary school,” which began with a W, Ndaliko said. The name…

Helping veterans

Several murders at Fort Bragg in 2002 led Eric Elbogen to wonder if violence was a growing problem for some veterans. Elbogen, a forensic psychologist in UNC’s Department of Psychiatry, worked with civilians then, but troubling news of soldiers’ violence began a change in his career path. His work since then has led to a…

#LoveCarolina

What do you love about Carolina? For the past 14 days, you have been sharing your answers, and the responses have been fun, sweet and full of Tar Heel pride. “Spring when the trees and flowers are in bloom, sitting in the quad, enjoying the sun, knowing there is no more perfect place,” tweeted Ann…

Snow days

A winter storm has canceled classes, closed offices at the University and even postponed Wednesday night’s Duke-Carolina game. It also created some beautiful images around campus. Here’s one of ours, courtesy of University photographer Dan Sears. Share yours with us using #UNCsnow on Twitter (@Carolina_news) and Instagram (@uncchapelhill). The folks at Carolina’s School of Education…

UNC ‘perfect place’ to study sticky subject

Mucus might not be the most attractive thing to study, but it’s what attracted Sam Lai to Carolina. While finishing his post-graduate work at Johns Hopkins University, Lai had his eye on the research coming out of UNC. There was the Cystic Fibrosis and Pulmonary Research and Treatment Center, the Center for Infectious Diseases, a…